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Shift for yourself?

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BigBendHiker

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Re: Shift for yourself?
« Reply #15 on: September 23, 2007, 05:34:50 PM »
Got a manual transmission here on my F-150.  Can be a pain from time to time in stop and go traffic.  Hate to admit it...but wish it was an automatic.

What is interesting...the towing capacity on that truck is greater with an automatic than with the manual.  Seemed surprising to me.

BBH

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Offline jeffblaylock

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Re: Shift for yourself?
« Reply #16 on: September 23, 2007, 09:03:48 PM »
I love this thread. On my laptop, it doesn't say "Shift"  :cheesy:
Jeff Blaylock
Austin, Texas

"We'll be back, someday soon. We will return, someday, and when we do the gritty
splendor and the complicated grandeur of Big Bend will still be here. Waiting for us."--Ed Abbey

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Offline Doc Savage

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Re: Shift for yourself?
« Reply #17 on: September 24, 2007, 10:51:18 AM »
In the offroad world, this is one of the great debates, like the Coke vs. Pepsi debate

Personally it is a no brainer..... Manual all the way! All my jeeps  (well except for the Wagoneer and Grand Cherokee) have been manuals until the Unlimited. I waited a year till DC finally decided to put the manual in them to get one, and still ended up with an auto. The Mother-in-law was traveling with us some to watch the kids and she can not drive a manual so we ended up getting an auto (and she is working to much to come with us any more).

The auto is MUCH less responsive offroad than a manual, and it rolls backward much easier when going over a hump. You also loose the ability to use engine braking when going down steep hills that you get with the manual. The one drawback to a stick is stalling out uphill and restarting, but that is easily handled with the addition of a hand throttle (I stalled out on a climb in BIBE with the popup behind the jeep on the River Road once and with the hand throttle, starting and going without rolling back any was simple).

Personally I do not mind if I never own an auto again. Even my big RV would be better suited with a stick as opposed to an auto.

Robert
Enjoying the Texas life!

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Offline homerboy2u

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Re: Shift for yourself?
« Reply #18 on: September 24, 2007, 11:22:23 AM »
Iin response to the inital thread, and to answer the question being applied to the Moutains around Big bend.....NO BRAINER: A manual transmission, like Doc Savage and the rest of the bunch have said, on inclines steep or not and specially in that area , if going for a long while, very easuly ou can end up with brake burnout's. That is very common to see this, specially when you see other vehicles crossing a stream, they are siizzling in the brake area, they have to be hot, out of sight adn very easily to breakdown. While if you do the same with a manual and you been stoping witht the engine brake and nothing happens while you cross the same path, then something is working right for you.

  This is from personal, experience.
Stay thirsty, my friends.

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Offline 01ACRViper

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Re: Shift for yourself?
« Reply #19 on: September 24, 2007, 01:05:32 PM »
1st gear and 4 low work more than well enough for me downhill, i've descended a few mountain passes in CO not touching the brakes once. the only time i have to break is a very steep drop off, like a rock or something. anyone with an auto and 4 lo should be able to descend with no brakes just as easilly

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Offline West Egg

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Re: Shift for yourself?
« Reply #20 on: November 15, 2007, 01:02:56 AM »
I prefer a manual, for all the reasons given by the shifty sorts on this thread.  One thing I would add is that a manual in virtually any on- or off-road situation gives you more control over the vehicle, especially when wrangling a trailer.  I find it also forces me to pay more attention to my driving.  And rowing your own makes it nearly impossible to talk on a cell-phone while driving in-town, which is a good thing in my book.  Fortunately, I rarely have to deal with stop-n-go traffic, even in SA, so it makes the choice easier.

As for the torque multiplication advantages of an automatic . . . it decreases as engine RPM increases and the torque converter gets closer to lockup.  So the 2x advantage an auto has near idle goes away fairly quickly vs. a fully-engaged clutch at, say, 1,500-2,000 RPM, considering the lower gearing in a manual box.  And given the huge losses to heat when an automatic slipping at low RPM, I wonder how much of the paper torque advantage actually makes its way to the wheels.

But hey, some folks like Coke, some like Dr. Pepper.  (Pepsi's an abomination.)  I guess the ideal would be a hybrid auto-manual, along the lines of the Audi/VW DSG, that can stand up to the torque and weight of a truck.

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Offline ridgescrambler

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Re: Shift for yourself?
« Reply #21 on: December 02, 2007, 08:02:48 PM »
I have had a manual for more years than I can count. I just got a new vehicle and it is an automatic 4x4. I was a little skeptical but she performs beautifully and granny gear really is granny gear in 4x4. She can happily crawl just about anywhere and my son and I had a blast in Big Bend a couple weeks ago. So I am almost converted but I do occassionally grab the stick to shift (no that is reverse!!) and my left foot just doesn't know what to do but I guess after 25 years of stick it will take awhile to get used to auto. just my 25 cents.
Head to the mountains for only there are you truly free.......hhmm I just have to travel further to get a mountain

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Offline badknees

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Re: Shift for yourself?
« Reply #22 on: December 02, 2007, 09:36:33 PM »
Auto is better in the sand.
Not all those who wander are lost.
J.R.R. Tolkien

Through the Mirror
http://mirrormagic.com

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Offline Al

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Re: Shift for yourself?
« Reply #23 on: December 02, 2007, 10:22:34 PM »
A few years ago I asked some serious off road guys I used to hang with why all their rigs had standard transmissions.  I'm talking some serious weekend warriors.  We did trails in Colorado, Utah, eastern Oklahoma, and central Texas. The friend I went with had a highly modified Jeep rebuilt from the ground up and a blueprinted 400 inch cubic inch engine, hot cam, 4 barrel carb, etc, etc, etc. Most had Chevy 350's and there was even a Corvette LT-1 in one of the Jeeps. They mumbled something about more control, tougher than an automatic and such.  Seemed like an automatic would be easier to drive.  The problem I had was shifting from 1st, which is essentially a granny gear, to second while hill climbing.  Tough to do when going over rocks on a steep slope. 

Seems like it's been since 2000 that serious 4-wheelers started using automatics.  If I had a choice I'd go with the automatic if I was going to do some serious climbing, but a standard would do also.  I'm just happy to be along for the ride!

Al

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Offline Al

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Re: Shift for yourself?
« Reply #24 on: December 03, 2007, 09:39:37 AM »
Here's a shot I took of one of the guys hill climbing in eastern Oklahoma.  Never looks as bad as it really is.  Looks like he made it to second gear . . .



Al

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Offline Al

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Re: Shift for yourself?
« Reply #25 on: December 05, 2007, 11:06:59 PM »
Sorry for hijacking this thread but as long as it's done, these guys really knew what they were doing.  It takes a lot of skills to do what they did and still make it enjoyable.  The first time I got behind the wheel I made it about 100 feet before I was delicately balanced, immobilized and suspended on rocks by two opposing wheels.  The wench on the front of that jeep and the others were used more than once on that trip.  I don't think any of us made all the climbs without a problem all on established trails.  We never went off road and did not impact the environment.  The back roads were hard enough.

It's not unusual for axles to break on the trail.  We all carried a least one spare axle.  They have compressors mounted on their engines to power air tools and used the roll bars for the air storage tank.  One exceptional mechanic who was with us could replace a broken front axle in less than 30 minutes on the trail and carry a conversation at the same time! 

We got a 2 inch gash in the sidewall of one our tires.  I thought we were dead in the water.  He used a Walmart repair kit to fill the gash with repair strips and had us back on the trail in 10 minutes.  All in all it was great fun but has absolutely nothing to do with Big Bend.  So I'll be good now and drop this.

Al

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Offline Doc Savage

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Re: Shift for yourself?
« Reply #26 on: December 07, 2007, 12:01:22 PM »
Al,

Sounds like fun, but you ain't seen nothing until you've set a bead on a tire with a little starter fluid and a match (don't stand over the tire when doing this please) ;) I had the pleasure of ripping a valve steam off once. To keep from having to break the bead to insert another, I found out it is possiable to put a valve steam in from the outside with axle grease, and two screwdrivers (not the fun way to do it).

Snapped an axle once and had to replace it on the trail. Wouldn't have been that big a deal, but I had an EZ locker installed instead of the spider gears and had a heck of a time getting the broken stub out so I could bet the locker out. Since then, I've carried a floor lamp pole (3 piece screw together metal tube basically) to be able to poke it out from the opposite side.

Robert
Enjoying the Texas life!

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Offline presidio

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Re: Shift for yourself?
« Reply #27 on: December 07, 2007, 12:52:36 PM »
Sounds like fun, but you ain't seen nothing until you've set a bead on a tire with a little starter fluid and a match (don't stand over the tire when doing this please) ;)

A long time ago, I bent a rim offroad just enough that when the 'wheel went round and round' it would leak air when the damage was at the bottom and the sidewall flexed.

I had no tools suitable to deal with it and didn't want to change to the spare, thus losing the extra tire. So, a hefty limestone rock of appropriate size was used to successfully hammer the leak closed. A different example of sedimentation plugging things up  :cheesy:

It never required further attention. However, a note of caution. This was a steel rim. Doing the same on an alloy rim could set up stress risers that might lead to eventual cracking and failure (the same could happen to steel but it's a lot less brittle). Due to the perversity of fate, if such were to happen, it would only occur at high speed on the interstate rather than backing out of your driveway.
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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

 


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