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Big Bend National Park,Administrative History

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Offline doodle228

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Big Bend National Park,Administrative History
« on: February 25, 2006, 11:00:20 AM »
To all of those that are interested about how Big Bend National Park became a National Park and the history of when it began you can put in your google search:
big bend national park,administrative history (Chapter 1 Endnotes) and hit search and pull up 18 Chapters of the Big Bend National Park and it shows this was last updated in 2003
I found this very interesting and renewed alot of names & history that I never knew about.  It even mention's my dad's name in (Chapter 13)one of the chapters (W.A. Cooper, Jr when the park purchased his land for the Park.  Also, Bobby Cooper was mentioned on one article, when he was only 10 years old, and he is my uncle.

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Offline RichardM

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BBNP Administrative History
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2006, 08:50:44 PM »
Thanks for the info.  I remember seeing this a few years ago and showing it to my Dad, but had forgotten to post it here.  Very interesting reading.
Big Bend NP Administrative History

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Offline Hang10er

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Re: Big Bend National Park,Administrative History
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2018, 12:20:44 PM »
Started reading this when it was mentioned on another thread.  Great reading so far.  I had to laugh when I read the desert can reach 180!  Wow! That might be a bit high.

However, I was intrigued reading about the early Native Americans, the Jumanos and others.  It says there were "permanent communities" upriver in the area where the Rio Grande and Rio Concho join (Presidio area).  Does anyone know of any evidence still there?

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Offline badknees

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Re: Big Bend National Park,Administrative History
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2018, 12:41:55 PM »
Started reading this when it was mentioned on another thread.  Great reading so far.  I had to laugh when I read the desert can reach 180!  Wow! That might be a bit high.

However, I was intrigued reading about the early Native Americans, the Jumanos and others.  It says there were "permanent communities" upriver in the area where the Rio Grande and Rio Concho join (Presidio area).  Does anyone know of any evidence still there?

Don't know what evidence still exists, but that area - La Junta de los Ríos, has been inhabited since the Paleo-Indian Period from 8,000 to 6,500 B.C.

I believe the area that surrounds the confluence of the Conchos and the Rio Grande is the longest continuously inhabited region in Texas.
Not all those who wander are lost.
– J.R.R. Tolkien

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Offline presidio

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Re: Big Bend National Park,Administrative History
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2018, 02:12:57 PM »
I had to laugh when I read the desert can reach 180!  Wow! That might be a bit high.

Yes, it might be a bit high, and I have not read the document for context, but surface temperatures in the desert can exceed air temperatures by a goodly margin. I would assume this is what they were referencing (or meant to say if the statement left a different impression).

The highest surface temperature recorded was in the Lut Desert in 2005 at 159° F.

A NASA report says: "Scientists first measured that difference in June 1915. “Around the same time that the Death Valley record air temperature was measured, an analysis of the temperature conditions of air and soil was conducted in the desert near Tucson, Arizona,” Mildrexler explains. In the midday sun, the temperature 0.4 centimeters below the soil surface was 71.5°C (160.7°F). The air temperature, measured four feet above the ground, was 42.5°C (108.5°F)."
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<  presidio  >
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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline Hang10er

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Re: Big Bend National Park,Administrative History
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2018, 02:46:01 PM »
I think it did say "ground temperature" or temperature on the ground" or something to that effect.

 


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