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Snakes of Texas

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Offline Bobcat

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Re: Coachwhip story
« Reply #30 on: January 31, 2006, 02:16:43 PM »
Quote from: "Bobcat"
Quote from: "MarkB"
Quote from: "Bobcat"
Quote from: "Anonymous"
Bobcat: Found a forum on the net with coachwhip encounters etc.
http://forum.kingsnake.com/racer/messages/282.html


Thanks very much, guest.  Those accounts sure help my credibility.  I'll add my account on the Kingsnake.com site.  Thanks again.  Bob cat.


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Your welcome Bobcat. That was a post I made and forgot to login etc.


Thanks Mark. Yesterday, I posted my account on the Kingsnake.com site in the "Coachwhip and Racers" forum.  Got some replies to that post that make my story even more credible. Obviously, the people on those forums are very serious herpers.


Here's the thread I started at Kingsnake.com.  My handle is "sprem".  I just like the feel of that handle.  There's more than 3 posts, so go to bottom and click on "show entire thread".  Skip my "Coachwhip Account" as it's the same account I presented here.

http://forums.kingsnake.com/view.php?id=996516,996516
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chisos_muse

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"Sprem"
« Reply #31 on: January 31, 2006, 06:59:35 PM »
Hmmm...like the feel of that eh? Aer ew gngio bcak ot hte hlwoe belgeli ubt leldsimpe sdowr? MLOA :lol:  :lol:


How'd ya tend to that bite anyway?

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Offline Bobcat

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Re: "Sprem"
« Reply #32 on: January 31, 2006, 08:26:50 PM »
Quote from: "chisos_muse"
Hmmm...like the feel of that eh? Aer ew gngio bcak ot hte hlwoe belgeli ubt leldsimpe sdowr? MLOA :lol:  :lol:


How'd ya tend to that bite anyway?


ans to the first question = not nessy sarah lee

ans to the second question = the Timber bite story I posted on the old chat site:

 It was a warm, humid Friday( 6-11-93) and I was heading for a Mississippi Bluff area on the Wisconsin side of the River that had all the necessary habitat for Crotalis Horridus aka Timber Rattlesnake.  When I arrived at the area on foot, I found myself approximately 2 miles from my car.  This was going to be a capture-photo-release event.  About 2/3 of the way up the bluff, I surprised 4 Timbers behind an up slope side of a large slab of limestone.  These snakes were fully stretched and all in contact with one another.  When they caught sight of me, they immediately took refuge under the rock.  I'm very careful to not damage snakes, so I took my time to get these herps moving. And when they finally made their move, all of them went in different directions.  The largest snake, which I was chasing, managed to get down to an overhang of limestone with a large hole underneath. And when I caught up with my friend, I needed to do a fast tail pull to get a proper herp hook in position.  The head was in an S config just inside the hole(which I failed to see) and that turned out to be the brown lightning that hit my left hand(these were my reckless days of "hotdog herping"). The snake was now coiled in the classic coil and was just looking at me,waiting for something to happen. And for good reason.  Within 10 seconds, I became aware that this wasn't a dry bite and I was in serious trouble. I tried to suck out what poison I could, but of course, that's totally ineffective.  Then, I used my headband as a wide tourniquet above the left hand. Having done that, it was time to get down off the bluff.  But on the way down, bad things were happening in my body and the scenery was getting to look a tad fuzzy.  You may wonder what was going through my head at this time.  Was I thinking of death?  No.  I was thinking that I needed to get myself out of this unfortunate situation.  Somehow, you just keep moving.  I managed to get down onto the railroad tracks, but I was fading significantly and it became apparent that making it to the car was not an option.  Then I heard the faint voice of a child.  So I picked myself up and headed toward the voice.  And about a quarter mile down the tracks I heard an adult voice.  As it turned out, a young couple and their child had just landed their boat on a small spit of sand on the River. I broke through the brush and stumbled into their private space.  Naturally, they were somewhat frightened.  I was very dirty and sweaty and my hand and forearm were swollen twice their normal size and were dark blue.  But I was able to communicate my situation to them and asked them if they would please boat me up to the little railroad town of Diamond Bluff.  Once there, I would call an ambulance.  Their first move was to try to flag the only other boat on the River,but no dice.  So they reluctantly got involved and boated me to Diamond Bluff and dropped me off with some house builders.  I was in real bad shape now.  And I had this incredible thirst.  It was overwhelming.  When the ambulance arrived, I was on my back and in full shock.  My B/P was 60/40 I was told later.  At the hospital(after the surgeon consulted with an Az hospital and the Mayo Clinic) the surgeon made 3 huge cuts into my hand to relieve the pressure and then the antivenin was started (4 hours after the bite).  4 days later I went into anaphylactic shock from the antivenin.  That required heavy duty cortisone products, IV style.  My blood required a near total makeover.  After 10 days in a Red Wing, MN hospital, I was shipped to the VA Hospital in Minneapolis for more treatment.  The rest of the story has to do with subsequent hand operations and occupational therapy which I don't think you'd find very interesting.
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chisos_muse

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"Cheesecake? Poundcake?"
« Reply #33 on: February 01, 2006, 08:41:26 AM »
"Nobody does it like Sara Lee?" :?

Your story had me on the edge of my seat.....I read it out loud to my beau and he made cringes in his face as if he were feeling your pain much like he did when watching Richard's animated football slam!
Then we had poundcake....... :wink:

Glad ya made it through that whole ordeal, the board wouldn't be the same without ya, Bobcat! 8)

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Offline randell

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Snakes of Texas
« Reply #34 on: February 01, 2006, 09:16:07 AM »
That story will scare some sense into ya.  I always knew a bite could be bad, but not that bad!  Yikes.  

I've never been bitten, but had a few close scrapes.  One time when I was a kid living on a ranch in South Texas, I was riding my bike in the driveway.  My parents had always told me not to go into the tall grass where the mowed area ended.  One day I was jacking around and wound up in the tall grass.  Sure enough, I ran over or right next to a rattler.  I just remember looking down and seeing him strike the pedals of the bike where my foot had just been.  Needless to say, I went screaming to the house.

Another time I walked out to the barn were I had a few weeks earlier stacked bailes hay about 8 feet high.  As I rounded the corner of the stack, my eye caught movement and there was a rattler at eye level sitting in a gap between bailes of hay.  He didn't strike, but scared the bejeesus out of me.

Ok, last one: one time my dad took me to my grandfather's ranch near D'Hanis (west of San Antonio) and he took me swimming in a stock tank.  I was concerned (I mostly grew up in West Texas where there isn't much water - so not much aquatic experience) about swimming in water where I couldn't see the bottom.  He coaxed me in and as I was swimming around nervously, I said "what if there is a snake in here".  "There's no snakes in here, " he said.  A few seconds later I looked behind him and saw a snake swimming across the water.  "What's that?", I asked.  That ended out swim for the day.
There's nothing like a good quest to get you intimate with a place. - Tom Clynes

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Offline RichardM

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Snakes of Texas
« Reply #35 on: February 01, 2006, 09:45:37 AM »
Just don't ask Bobcat to repost the picture of his hand after the bite.  Ok, maybe a link to it for those just too curious or looking for help with their diets.

I haven't had too many rattler encounters, so I guess I've been lucky.  My best story (lame as it is) was from my Boy Scout days.  Three of us were doing a reconnoiter hike in the dark on the back side of Enchanted Rock.  We were camped in Becky's Crack (now called Echo Canyon) and as the younger members of the troop we were sent out for firewood.  I was already a convert to using night vision and saving the flashlight for emergencies but my two friends were as yet uneducated.  I let them stay 20-30 yards ahead of me so I wouldn't lose my sight.  They walked right over a rattler warming itself on a flat rock, apparently thinking it was just a stick.  I recognized it from about 5 feet away and went around it, calmly saying "Hey guys, did you see this rattlesnake on the trail?"  They both levitated up onto a large boulder.  After we went back and inspected the snake, I educated them on how if you walk with a flashlight, you only see what's directly in the beam of light and miss everything else.  By the time we got back to junior high on Monday, that rattler had grown from three feet long to over six.

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Offline Bobcat

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Must repost hand now
« Reply #36 on: February 01, 2006, 11:48:03 AM »
This was when my hand was looking much,much better.  The really gross pics are on transparencies.
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Offline randell

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Snakes of Texas
« Reply #37 on: February 01, 2006, 12:05:30 PM »
Looks like a picture from Terminator!  What ARE those things stuck in your hand?
There's nothing like a good quest to get you intimate with a place. - Tom Clynes

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Offline RichardM

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Bobcat's hand
« Reply #38 on: February 01, 2006, 12:30:05 PM »
Dagnabbit!  I said put it in as a link, not an embedded image!  Glad I already had lunch...

(Actually the pic doesn't bother me much, but my inner child likes the idea of others being bugged by it)

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Johnny

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What the ??
« Reply #39 on: February 01, 2006, 12:34:12 PM »
Did you break the hand as well??That device is called an external fixation device.It is used to stabalize really nasty fractures.Also looks like a stabilization pin has been drilled into the thumb.

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Offline Bobcat

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Re: What the ??
« Reply #40 on: February 01, 2006, 01:14:11 PM »
Quote from: "Johnny"
Did you break the hand as well??That device is called an external fixation device.It is used to stabalize really nasty fractures.Also looks like a stabilization pin has been drilled into the thumb.


They had to use that apparatus because of the massive tissue damage in that hand. No broken bones.  They wanted that hand to look like a hand after their treatment.

ps to Randell.   Prior to that bite, I had made well over a hundred Timber captures and releases.  And, I did many more captures and releases after the bite.  However, after the bite, I changed my method and started using herp tongs(much safer).  Currently, I'm out of the capture/release business and now just check on some dens in the Spring and Fall.  I'll take a photo without disturbing the snakes.
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Offline randell

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Snakes of Texas
« Reply #41 on: February 01, 2006, 01:52:52 PM »
That had to be a miserable experience.  

Living in the country, we had a number of animals.  Among them were a large contingent of cats.  One cat was bit in the head by a snake once.  I don't know that it was a rattler, but his whole head became swolen and he was very lethargic for a while, but he pulled through and was eventually back to his normal self except for he had fang-scars on his head.  He was a very large, heavy built cat, so that may have helped him.  Have no idea what kind of snake bit him, though.  

Aother time I looked out the window of our house and saw a troop of cats had surrounded our four horse trailer.  I went out to investigate and discovered that they had a snake trapped under the trailer.  When the snake was looking at one cat, another would come in from behind and take a swipe at it.  This went on for some time.  It was something to watch this go down - the cats had a very intersting strategy going.  Don't remember what happened to the snake (this was about 20 years ago).

I've had a lot of encounters with snakes but I don't think I could do what you do as they scare the hell out of me.  I handled a bullsnake that my mom caught once, but that creeped me out to no end.
There's nothing like a good quest to get you intimate with a place. - Tom Clynes

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chisos_muse

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Cool....
« Reply #42 on: February 01, 2006, 04:42:24 PM »
Ouchy!!!

Are there many scars? Chicks dig scars....Tell them the snake was 40 feet long and 10 feet tall........it won't matter, they'll already be drunk..... :?

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Offline Bobcat

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Re: Cool....
« Reply #43 on: February 01, 2006, 07:58:43 PM »
Quote from: "chisos_muse"
Ouchy!!!

Are there many scars? Chicks dig scars....Tell them the snake was 40 feet long and 10 feet tall........it won't matter, they'll already be drunk..... :?


If Chicks dig scars, I gots scars wherever they want them : /
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