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Wax camp!

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Offline colojo

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Wax camp!
« on: January 21, 2006, 08:55:30 PM »
Interesting info on the Big Bend wax industry.  I don't know about you but these guys have always interested me.
http://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/waxcamps/index.html

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Offline Casa Grande

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Re: Wax camp!
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2006, 07:47:01 PM »
Quote from: "colojo"
Interesting info on the Big Bend wax industry.  I don't know about you but these guys have always interested me.
http://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/waxcamps/index.html


that is cool!   Thanks for sharing it!

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mattybravo

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wax camp
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2006, 11:17:30 AM »
Both sides of my family are from Fort Stockton and we used to have some ranchland down on the river below Dryden, east of the park.  Granddad took me down there once when I was 14 or so and showed me one of the old wax vats.  They also have one down at Chinati Hot Springs near Ruidosa.

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BigBendHiker

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Thanks!
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2006, 12:26:06 PM »
There is so much history in the Big Bend area!

In the book "Beneath the Window", Patricia Wilson Clothier tells of her family living in what is now Big Bend.  It is an excellent book.  Towards the end of the book, she mentions the efforts to remove evidence of human habitation in the park shortly after the park opened.  I can certainly understand the reasons (having to maintain the buildings, fear of people getting hurt in them, etc).  But...it sure would have been cool to have a look up close and personal at where those first pioneers lived...

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SHANEA

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Question
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2006, 12:31:38 PM »
At BGWMA down by one of the fish camps on the Mighty Rio Grande River, don't have the GPS coordinates with me, there is an old steam engine type thing.  Always wondered if this was used for wax production and if not, what was it used for?  Big heavy piece of equipment to be out left abandoned in the middle of absoluteley no where.  Anyone know what the history of this is?   All images resized small for your viewing pleasure!   8)










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Offline colojo

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Keystone
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2006, 02:00:02 PM »
Found this blub in the Beaver County PA Times

In 1882, the Keystone Driller Co., once located in Beaver Falls, make a portable steam drilling machine as an alternative to the less portable wooden oil rig, according to the paper. The peak production of oil around Economy was around 1910.

Probably part of the quicksilver mines or perhaps even some old oil expoloration in the park.

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SHANEA

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Thanks...
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2006, 03:11:16 PM »
I'd researched it to several years ago when I got back from out there, and came to the same conclusions that you came to.  It just didn't seem to "fit" the location though for any oil exploration or mining operations - right down on the river in the flood plain.  I have never seen any indications of quicksilver mining at BGWMA, but that does not mean it wasn't there as there is so much of the area that I've never explored.  I did take a look at some topos one time and saw no indications of mining operations.  Can't really imagine any oil exploration ever being done out there.  Always kinda figured it was somehow related to some large scale wax operation attempt.  Lot of the BGWMA is devoid of history - there is an old ruin of what was once a really nice adobe house near some of the first fish camps in BGWMA proper - not down by the La Linda bridge/horse canyon.  Speaking of horse canyon, has anyone heard if the state did the land swap between TPW and the GLO which would have closed down horse canyon?  There is also a farily "new" house down in horse canyon near fish camps #1 and #2 - fairly new meaning that it is probably 20-30 years old, still standing, and still had glass windows and doors last time I was down there.  Really spooky.  Of course, horse canyon was spooky too - could easily drive/walk between Ole Mexico and BGWMA.  In fact, one time we were down there - there was a red pickup just across and up the hill from the river, looked like they were waiting on someone or something...

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Offline TexasGirl

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Wax camp!
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2006, 04:45:51 PM »
This afternoon I read a June 1968 Nat Geo article about Big Bend.  A similarly shaped piece of machinery was identified as a pump to bring water in from the river for irrigation.
As a matter of fact, I _do_ have an opinion on that....

 


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