Friends of Big Bend National Park
Big Bend Conservancy

Over-estimating your experience or under-estimating the terrain in a place like Big Bend can result in serious injury or death. Use the information and advice found here wisely. Climb/Hike/Camp/Drive at your own risk.

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Big Bend Backroads

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Offline jimmyaustin

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Big Bend Backroads
« Reply #45 on: May 11, 2006, 09:23:10 PM »
Richard, Roy, Doc--Thanks for your insights.  I am encouraged!

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Offline jimmyaustin

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Big Bend Backroads
« Reply #46 on: May 11, 2006, 09:26:36 PM »
Also, Doc-- so great you mentioned the Shafer and White Rim trails.  Reading that, I remembered that a very experienced guy working the visitor center at Arches told me exactly the same thing: that the trail eastbound  toward the potash road should be fine in 2W drive

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BIBEARCH.

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Big Bend Backroads
« Reply #47 on: May 18, 2006, 02:21:06 PM »
Quote from: "WL2"
You might find this interesting.

http://ojinaga.com/gravesites/


Another view regarding the information presented on this website:

Big Bend National Park resource files contain information on over 40 gravesites or cemeteries and over 300 graves. Contrary to the statement in the guide, these are not considered "archeological sites," but are considered and managed as historic resources. More precisely, the National Park Service, and specifically, Big Bend National Park, actively engages affiliated ethnic groups in discourses leading to mutually beneficial protection of these important resources.

Contrary to the statement that "the entrenched bureaucracy of the National Park System" discourages families from tending graves, the National Park Service encourages the participation of affiliated ethnic groups in management of park resources. Staff at Big Bend National Park considers Hispanic communities and homesteads to be ethnographic resources because they are linked with an extant, living cultural group.

The following statement used to be found on the park's website under the "Research Needs":

Historic research
Gravesites and cemeteries: More than 40 gravesites and 300 graves are scattered throughout the park. Most graves contain unidentified individuals. Oral history interviews with elderly pre-park residents can assist the park in identification of individuals buried in the park’s cemeteries. A Historic Context is needed of cemetery establishment, development, and current condition so that preservation plans can address problems of erosion, collapse, and vandalism to these sensitive sites.

Over the years, graves and cemeteries have been vandalized, their contents looted for burial goods and human remains. For this reason, the park chooses to not publicize locations of these sensitive sites.

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Offline BIBEARCH

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Big Bend Backroads
« Reply #48 on: May 18, 2006, 02:26:07 PM »
Quote from: "Roy"
Wondering if you know anything about this site.  It's shown on Trails Illustrated map near Terlingua Creek a couple of miles north of Terlingua Abaja.  There are also the remains of an old stone house and at least one vehicle.  I've asked several people, including the Park archeologist but have not gotten any info.


The location is identified on the 1903 USGS Terlingua Quadrangle as Dryden Ranch. Mr. Dryden operated a brick kiln at that location and made fired bricks in his furnace. Some of these bricks can be seen at a large ruin on the west side of Terlingua Creek in Terlingua Abajo.
The opinion expressed above is my own and not that of the National Park Service or the Federal government.

"Government of the people, by the people, for the people . . . people hey, that's us!"? - Swami Beyondananda

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Offline Roy

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Big Bend Backroads
« Reply #49 on: May 18, 2006, 05:03:31 PM »
Thanks for the info;  someone else had found it on an old map dated 1904 and I had found the reference to the Brick Kiln with a Google search.  The Willeford paper has been posted here also.   A couple of our chatters are interested in this kind of thing and you will probably  be getting the occasional question from us;  right now a couple of us are trying to figure out Tres Negritas.

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Offline BIBEARCH

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Big Bend Backroads
« Reply #50 on: May 18, 2006, 05:29:18 PM »
Quote from: "Roy"
Thanks for the info;  someone else had found it on an old map dated 1904 and I had found the reference to the Brick Kiln with a Google search.  The Willeford paper has been posted here also.   A couple of our chatters are interested in this kind of thing and you will probably  be getting the occasional question from us;  right now a couple of us are trying to figure out Tres Negritas.


I've followed the chat page even before David took it over (and GREATLY IMPROVED IT!), and decided I needed to jump into the fray.

Tres Negritas is another name for Black Peaks. The cemetery near there has been protected by its anonymity for years and I'm afraid recent publicity will be detrimental to it and other sensitive spots in the park.

I posted as guest to WL2's posting, and as I point out in that message, some of these sites have been looted. Contrary to Glen Willeford's comment, law enforcement rangers are not omnipresent to hand out citations and make arrests. And with all the budget cuts handed down from you know where, there's simply not enough money to treat all the physical problems in the park. If it were not for our many volunteers who love Big Bend and offer themselves to help us out, even the visitor centers wouldn't stay open. It's actually up to those of us who love this place and its secrets, to keep them that way. After all, isn't it a far better experience to discover these things on our own than to have them handed out completely with GPS coordinates?
The opinion expressed above is my own and not that of the National Park Service or the Federal government.

"Government of the people, by the people, for the people . . . people hey, that's us!"? - Swami Beyondananda

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Offline La rouge vache

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Re: Big Bend Backroads
« Reply #51 on: January 07, 2008, 08:18:44 PM »
Does anyone have any information on the Rosillos ranch road? I noticed most of it is in the park, but have not heard anyone say anything about it. It looks like a beautiful landscape, and I have wandered around in the area before, but never drove down the road...

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Offline BIBEARCH

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Re: Big Bend Backroads
« Reply #52 on: January 08, 2008, 08:40:42 AM »
Does anyone have any information on the Rosillos ranch road? I noticed most of it is in the park, but have not heard anyone say anything about it. It looks like a beautiful landscape, and I have wandered around in the area before, but never drove down the road...
The road across the North Rosillos addition of the park is a county road that leads west and exits park property at the north edge of the Sombrero Peak Ranch (privately owned), then crosses Terlingua Ranch (also privately owned) and eventually comes out on Highway 118. The public can drive the county road through Terlingua Ranch but should use it only to get across to Hwy 118.

In the park, the Rosillos Ranch Road leaves the north entrance road a few miles south of Persimmon Gap and heads west for a few miles to a fork. The right fork leads to an NPS administrative area behind a locked gate. The left fork is the county road. That section of road has some soft sandy areas and can become impassable after rainstorms just like the other dirt roads in the park. High clearance is advisable and as usual - check with one of the visitor centers for road conditions before travelling the road.

The park has planned to put in some roadside campsites in the North Rosillos, but there is no funding to cover construction costs. The area is open for day hiking and backpacking (all the permit requirements apply). Check with one of the visitor centers if you are interested in visiting that part of the park. Patrols are few and sporadic, so let someone know where you are going and when you expect to return.

Hope this helps.
The opinion expressed above is my own and not that of the National Park Service or the Federal government.

"Government of the people, by the people, for the people . . . people hey, that's us!"? - Swami Beyondananda

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Offline Doc Savage

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Re: Big Bend Backroads
« Reply #53 on: January 08, 2008, 10:38:15 AM »
Is the Rosillos ranch road the same as the Marathon road? We traveled that when we were over at Terlingua Ranch checking it out. Not a bad road. We were in a rush to get back for a ranger presentation and were able to go about 40 in the jeep. The sand is pretty deep and loose in spots, I'd say about 6-8" in some places. Would be nasty in the rain I bet.

Robert
Enjoying the Texas life!

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Offline BIBEARCH

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Re: Big Bend Backroads
« Reply #54 on: January 08, 2008, 10:58:08 AM »
Is the Rosillos ranch road the same as the Marathon road? We traveled that when we were over at Terlingua Ranch checking it out. Not a bad road. We were in a rush to get back for a ranger presentation and were able to go about 40 in the jeep. The sand is pretty deep and loose in spots, I'd say about 6-8" in some places. Would be nasty in the rain I bet.

Robert

East to west it's the Terlingua Ranch/Highway 118 road.  West to east it's the Marathon Road. Depends on the destination.

A quarter-inch rain can create long mud holes up to a foot deep with water and bottomless with mud.
The opinion expressed above is my own and not that of the National Park Service or the Federal government.

"Government of the people, by the people, for the people . . . people hey, that's us!"? - Swami Beyondananda

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Offline La rouge vache

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Re: Big Bend Backroads
« Reply #55 on: January 10, 2008, 07:31:09 PM »
Thanks for the info! I am looking forward to seeing this area close up. I'll post some pics when I get back in march.

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Offline RichardM

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tvc15

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Re: Big Bend Backroads
« Reply #57 on: September 22, 2010, 08:23:55 PM »
Quote from: Roy
Wondering if you know anything about this site.  It's shown on Trails Illustrated map near Terlingua Creek a couple of miles north of Terlingua Abaja.  There are also the remains of an old stone house and at least one vehicle.  I've asked several people, including the Park archeologist but have not gotten any info.

The location is identified on the 1903 USGS Terlingua Quadrangle as Dryden Ranch. Mr. Dryden operated a brick kiln at that location and made fired bricks in his furnace. Some of these bricks can be seen at a large ruin on the west side of Terlingua Creek in Terlingua Abajo.


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Offline BIBEARCH

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Re: Big Bend Backroads
« Reply #58 on: September 23, 2010, 07:36:00 AM »
Quote


Another place where Dryden's bricks were used is in the large house at Terlingua Abajo, once the home of Papa Joe Humphries and also used as the local school for a time. This building is partially adobe and partially brick. The vernacular architecture and construction methods employed in the park continually intrigue me.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2010, 09:04:25 AM by RichardM »
The opinion expressed above is my own and not that of the National Park Service or the Federal government.

"Government of the people, by the people, for the people . . . people hey, that's us!"? - Swami Beyondananda

 


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