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Glenn Springs #2 - what is this structure?

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Offline hanuman

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Glenn Springs #2 - what is this structure?
« on: March 22, 2010, 04:25:09 PM »
We wandered outside of our site in Glenn Springs #2 and ran across this unusual man-made structure. Does anyone know what it was used for? It made for some excellent photographs.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2010, 09:34:26 PM by RichardM »

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Offline catz

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Re: Glenn Springs #2 - what is this structure?
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2010, 04:36:19 PM »
Maybe a place where cattle were put for branding purposes?
Wake me when it's time to go.

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Offline hanuman

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Re: Glenn Springs #2 - what is this structure?
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2010, 04:45:16 PM »
i thought it was some sort of corral or troth, but it had these steps downward the lead to a small area that was filled in with debris.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2010, 09:35:21 PM by RichardM »

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Offline badknees

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Re: Glenn Springs #2 - what is this structure?
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2010, 04:57:18 PM »
i thought it was some sort of corral or troth, but it had these steps downward the lead to a small area that was filled in with debris.

It is a "dip" tank. Used to run cattle through to dip them for ticks, screwworm, and other pests. The water was infused with a pesticide to kill the offending insects. I don't think it works so well with screwworm, but it is pretty effective on ticks.
Not all those who wander are lost.
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Offline hanuman

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Re: Glenn Springs #2 - what is this structure?
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2010, 05:00:56 PM »
very cool. thank you!

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Offline homerboy2u

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Re: Glenn Springs #2 - what is this structure?
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2010, 08:12:02 PM »
i thought it was some sort of corral or troth, but it had these steps downward the lead to a small area that was filled in with debris.

It is a "dip" tank. Used to run cattle through to dip them for ticks, screwworm, and other pests. The water was infused with a pesticide to kill the offending insects. I don't think it works so well with screwworm, but it is pretty effective on ticks.

 Yes, in the very end,there is this abrupt wall. That is where cattle take the plunge in to treated water with all these sort pesticides , mainly for ticks and some flys too. The steps are used so the cattle can come out drenched, then they just hang out a bit so the rest of the pesticide water can drip off, then they are let loose back to countryside. A very common practice with ranchers and cattle growers everywhere.
Stay thirsty, my friends.

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BigBendHiker

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Re: Glenn Springs #2 - what is this structure?
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2010, 08:18:49 PM »
The ranch next to my father-in-law's place in Victoria County still has one of those that you can see.  Harkens back to an earlier day of the way the ranchers worked their cattle...

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Offline TheWildWestGuy

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Re: Glenn Springs #2 - what is this structure?
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2010, 11:41:23 PM »
Yes the screw worm or "cattle grub" used to be a nasty problem before they were eradicated by introducing sterile male fly's in mass numbers (I think this would have been back in the 1930's?).   The flies would lay eggs on the wounds of cattle or other animals and the maggots would hatch and eat the animals flesh.  As far as I know there are no more screw worms in Texas but it would be interesting to get some expert input on this topic.  TWWG

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Offline Al

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Re: Glenn Springs #2 - what is this structure?
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2010, 12:32:30 AM »
Interesting article. Our tax dollars at work.

Quote:  Owners of vat remains and archaeologists have been cautioned of the continued threat of arsenic poisoning around such resources. Although much of the toxic ingredients were dispersed into nearby water sources, some, such as sulfur and creosote, can remain in the soil. Vats were supposed to be recharged and the dip recycled at the beginning of the dipping season, but there is the possibility that the solution was simply left to leach into the ground as vats fell into disuse.

http://www.encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=2231

Al
« Last Edit: March 23, 2010, 12:56:20 AM by Al »

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Offline badknees

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Re: Glenn Springs #2 - what is this structure?
« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2010, 08:55:52 AM »
Yes the screw worm or "cattle grub" used to be a nasty problem before they were eradicated by introducing sterile male fly's in mass numbers (I think this would have been back in the 1930's?).   The flies would lay eggs on the wounds of cattle or other animals and the maggots would hatch and eat the animals flesh.  As far as I know there are no more screw worms in Texas but it would be interesting to get some expert input on this topic.  TWWG

Screw worm flies were still being attacked by the "sterile male fly" method as late as the late 70's. I was living in the RGV at this time and the USDA had a facility at Moore Field (old Air Force base), near McCook TX. They raised and irradiated male flies at this facility and released them by boxing them in light weight cardboard boxes and dumping them from aircraft all over the Valley and in Mexico. Once the males mated with the females, the eggs were not viable because the males were sterile.  One of my friend's father was a USDA pilot and we went to Moore field once to view the operation. The smell from the fly food was pretty overpowering, but the project was a success. The funny thing was, sometimes you would be driving down the road in the valley, and a small box would float down out of the sky and land nearby.
Not all those who wander are lost.
J.R.R. Tolkien

Through the Mirror
http://mirrormagic.com

 


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