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Terlingua Ranch Road?

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Offline jim2

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #45 on: August 28, 2019, 02:01:27 PM »
I asked a ranger about the Old Ore Road when I was in the park earlier this month. I was told that north of Ernst Tinaja you would need a serious high clearance four while drive and a spotter.
Since when? I've done it several times in a variety of four wheel and two wheel without a problem (save for wet conditions.)

It's what you get when an employee is asked about a road they've never been on, coupled with advice tailored to the usual clientele: urban operators contemplating their first ever off-the-pavement adventure. Translation: it's so hard and dangerous we (the NPS) cannot recommend you trying it, as you may not survive.

As anyone with real 4WD/offroad experience knows, there is not a single road in Big Bend even remotely approaching a designation of "challenging."

But, for those with their urban warrior 4WD pickups that never have left pavement, the fear and trepidation of vegetation scratches and getting dust on the paint overshadows knowing how to operate said vehicle in conditions it otherwise is capable of handling (and in Big Bend, that usually can be done in 2WD).

While I agree that the Rangers may try to dissuade the dissuade-able, this time I agree with need for 4wd on the OOR.  Last trip I started off in 2wd, as I have every time I drove the OOR, yes north of Ernst I started to slip and slide around even at the low speed we going. My sister even asked why are slipping so much?, I'm in 2wd.   Then we came upon a spot where the 4wd sure made it easy, and we hit several other spots where we were glad to have it.
Could a better driver have done it in 2wd? Maybe sure. With use of the locking rear diff, most likely. But, a better driver wasn't there, just me and my 4wd. Using the 4wd allowed me to crawl along take, in the scenery in much less stressful way than going with out it.
Only having 2wd on the OOR at the present time is not a good idea.


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Offline Slimkitty

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #46 on: August 28, 2019, 02:10:55 PM »
Well Iím no ďurban warriorĒ, my truck is a farm truck and spends most of its life on dirt roads. Iím also not looking for a wild 4x4 adventure, or to test the limits of my truck. Iíll have my wife and kid with me. We just want to explore a part of the park we havenít accessed yet.  It sounds like OOR is doable, but perhaps in worse shape these days than in previous years.  Iíll be interested to hear from anyone who has recently driven it.  However, I still am curious about the drive on Marathon road from Terlingua Ranch to the northern end of the park.  Anyone been through there lately?

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Offline presidio

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #47 on: August 28, 2019, 02:24:42 PM »
I still am curious about the drive on Marathon road from Terlingua Ranch to the northern end of the park.  Anyone been through there lately?

It's been a while. However, unless it's recently rained and made the road truly snotty (incredibly greasy clay base), there isn't much impediment that I can recall to a dry traverse.
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<  presidio  >
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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline elhombre

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #48 on: August 28, 2019, 05:26:03 PM »
It seems the govment keeps the road out to at least Butrill Springs/Ranch in real nice shape.   I was told the BP watches the area, and it looked to me that the road was well groomed so any foot prints would be obviously observable crossing the roadway.  Also told they have sensors out there.  Sure enough, the monkey in the plane found it necessary to buzz us 3 times at 200+ feet when we were hiking around the springs.   Nice area.  I would put it on the list of things to hike around if I was in the area again.  Just be warned that there is a ton of poison ivy down in the spring drainage.
First Russian Collusion, then Obstruction, then illegal payment to Stormy Daniels, now no formal vote on impeachment for a 30 min. phone call to Ukraine

No evidence, just more secret investigations and Shifty lies perpetuating insane blinding anger

America will survive.  God Bless America

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Offline Casa Grande

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #49 on: August 28, 2019, 05:50:19 PM »


In all the years I have roamed Terlingua Ranch, not once/never/ever has anyone tried to stop me or question what I am doing. Generally, I rarely encounter anyone away from the central part of TR and when I do the most that happens is a wave as we pass each other.

Don't come out to my property then. You will be met with a scantily clad wrinkly old bearded man wearing 1970's Dolphin running shorts, carrying an AK-47, driving an old Jeep, and asking you a whole lot of questions. And my road dead ends.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Big Bend Chat mobile app


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Offline presidio

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #50 on: August 28, 2019, 06:07:22 PM »
Don't come out to my property then. You will be met with a scantily clad wrinkly old bearded man wearing 1970's Dolphin running shorts, carrying an AK-47, driving an old Jeep, and asking you a whole lot of questions. And my road dead ends.

What? No beer to accompany the hello?

What kind of questions? Things like 'where does the white go when the snow melts?' 'What is the last digit of Pi?' 'Can you pull two round tables end-to-end?'

Or, something much harder?

As I said, a dead-end community road ends at the last property line. It becomes a driveway at that point.

How would I know where that is? Geo-referenced maps with the tract boundaries overlaid. Real-time navigation.

Easy peasy lemon squeezy.

 :dance: :s_cool:
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 06:21:28 PM by presidio »
_____________
<  presidio  >
_____________
Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline rocketman

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #51 on: August 28, 2019, 07:58:47 PM »
Well Iím no ďurban warriorĒ, my truck is a farm truck and spends most of its life on dirt roads. Iím also not looking for a wild 4x4 adventure, or to test the limits of my truck. Iíll have my wife and kid with me. We just want to explore a part of the park we havenít accessed yet.  It sounds like OOR is doable, but perhaps in worse shape these days than in previous years.  Iíll be interested to hear from anyone who has recently driven it.  However, I still am curious about the drive on Marathon road from Terlingua Ranch to the northern end of the park.  Anyone been through there lately?
It's been a year or so since I was on Marathon Rd, but there are a few general areas to watch out for. From the ranch, it's smooth sailing out to Sombrero Peak Ranch Rd except for a few foot-deep washouts after the "well-traveled" part. Watch your speed and you'll be fine. They can sure sneak up on you if you just blasting along.

Between Sombrero and Buttrill there are a few spots with very loose and sometimes deep sand. Keep your momentum going and stay in the tracks. After Buttrill ranch, the road takes a sharp left and goes north along a wash. This is the closest to "off roading" you will see unless the park crew has been out grading recently. There may be some rocky steps in places that you may have to get out and look at to pick a route. Probably not, but maybe after a hard rain.

Beyond the wash, you'll find two sharper-than-they-look right-handers. Then you'll get into more sand and in some places the road narrows, with hidden washouts so again, take it slow. I once came face to face with an F350 hauling a large livestock trailer while doing about 30 through there. The old man scolded me with his eyes. After you climb out of the lowland sands, you're close to the park road and should have no more worries.

I don't know when the last Google images were taken, but it looks to be in pretty good shape as of then.
Making ice cubes FROM THE SUN!!!

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Offline Txlj

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #52 on: August 29, 2019, 12:47:54 AM »
Don't come out to my property then. You will be met with a scantily clad wrinkly old bearded man wearing 1970's Dolphin running shorts, carrying an AK-47, driving an old Jeep, and asking you a whole lot of questions. And my road dead ends.

What? No beer to accompany the hello?

What kind of questions? Things like 'where does the white go when the snow melts?' 'What is the last digit of Pi?' 'Can you pull two round tables end-to-end?'

Or, something much harder?

As I said, a dead-end community road ends at the last property line. It becomes a driveway at that point.

How would I know where that is? Geo-referenced maps with the tract boundaries overlaid. Real-time navigation.

Easy peasy lemon squeezy.

 :dance: :s_cool:
I think Ive meet him before. Driving the back side of Hen Egg, we get those looks often.

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Offline Slimkitty

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #53 on: August 29, 2019, 07:28:18 AM »
Well Iím no ďurban warriorĒ, my truck is a farm truck and spends most of its life on dirt roads. Iím also not looking for a wild 4x4 adventure, or to test the limits of my truck. Iíll have my wife and kid with me. We just want to explore a part of the park we havenít accessed yet.  It sounds like OOR is doable, but perhaps in worse shape these days than in previous years.  Iíll be interested to hear from anyone who has recently driven it.  However, I still am curious about the drive on Marathon road from Terlingua Ranch to the northern end of the park.  Anyone been through there lately?
It's been a year or so since I was on Marathon Rd, but there are a few general areas to watch out for. From the ranch, it's smooth sailing out to Sombrero Peak Ranch Rd except for a few foot-deep washouts after the "well-traveled" part. Watch your speed and you'll be fine. They can sure sneak up on you if you just blasting along.

Between Sombrero and Buttrill there are a few spots with very loose and sometimes deep sand. Keep your momentum going and stay in the tracks. After Buttrill ranch, the road takes a sharp left and goes north along a wash. This is the closest to "off roading" you will see unless the park crew has been out grading recently. There may be some rocky steps in places that you may have to get out and look at to pick a route. Probably not, but maybe after a hard rain.

Beyond the wash, you'll find two sharper-than-they-look right-handers. Then you'll get into more sand and in some places the road narrows, with hidden washouts so again, take it slow. I once came face to face with an F350 hauling a large livestock trailer while doing about 30 through there. The old man scolded me with his eyes. After you climb out of the lowland sands, you're close to the park road and should have no more worries.

I don't know when the last Google images were taken, but it looks to be in pretty good shape as of then.
Thanks for this!  Itíll be November when I go out there but Iíll surely have this handy when we attempt the drive.

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Offline Slimkitty

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #54 on: August 29, 2019, 07:51:54 AM »


In all the years I have roamed Terlingua Ranch, not once/never/ever has anyone tried to stop me or question what I am doing. Generally, I rarely encounter anyone away from the central part of TR and when I do the most that happens is a wave as we pass each other.

Don't come out to my property then. You will be met with a scantily clad wrinkly old bearded man wearing 1970's Dolphin running shorts, carrying an AK-47, driving an old Jeep, and asking you a whole lot of questions. And my road dead ends.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Big Bend Chat mobile app
It is rare, but if you do happen to encounter Terlingua Man in his native environment, do not exit your vehicle or approach him.  Do not make eye contact with Terlingua Man.  If Terlingua Man attempts to engage with you, strongly insist you are not from the government.  If you cannot safely retreat and must defend yourself, a can of Terlingua Man spray (Pabst blue ribbon, well shaken) might distract him long enough for you to make your escape.  Leave the remaining cans at the edge of Terlingua Manís habitat.

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Offline jim2

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #55 on: August 29, 2019, 10:00:41 AM »


In all the years I have roamed Terlingua Ranch, not once/never/ever has anyone tried to stop me or question what I am doing. Generally, I rarely encounter anyone away from the central part of TR and when I do the most that happens is a wave as we pass each other.

Don't come out to my property then. You will be met with a scantily clad wrinkly old bearded man wearing 1970's Dolphin running shorts, carrying an AK-47, driving an old Jeep, and asking you a whole lot of questions. And my road dead ends.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Big Bend Chat mobile app
It is rare, but if you do happen to encounter Terlingua Man in his native environment, do not exit your vehicle or approach him.  Do not make eye contact with Terlingua Man.  If Terlingua Man attempts to engage with you, strongly insist you are not from the government.  If you cannot safely retreat and must defend yourself, a can of Terlingua Man spray (Pabst blue ribbon, well shaken) might distract him long enough for you to make your escape.  Leave the remaining cans at the edge of Terlingua Manís habitat.

Thanks for the laugh!

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Offline Txlj

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #56 on: August 29, 2019, 12:21:39 PM »
Thanks for the tip! Throw down beer for the safety kit.

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Offline Casa Grande

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #57 on: August 29, 2019, 07:12:47 PM »


In all the years I have roamed Terlingua Ranch, not once/never/ever has anyone tried to stop me or question what I am doing. Generally, I rarely encounter anyone away from the central part of TR and when I do the most that happens is a wave as we pass each other.

Don't come out to my property then. You will be met with a scantily clad wrinkly old bearded man wearing 1970's Dolphin running shorts, carrying an AK-47, driving an old Jeep, and asking you a whole lot of questions. And my road dead ends.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Big Bend Chat mobile app
It is rare, but if you do happen to encounter Terlingua Man in his native environment, do not exit your vehicle or approach him.  Do not make eye contact with Terlingua Man.  If Terlingua Man attempts to engage with you, strongly insist you are not from the government.  If you cannot safely retreat and must defend yourself, a can of Terlingua Man spray (Pabst blue ribbon, well shaken) might distract him long enough for you to make your escape.  Leave the remaining cans at the edge of Terlingua Manís habitat.
Lol, He's actually a pretty good guy.  And funny.   Pretty lucky to have a such a watch dog neighbor since we're rarely there.  He watches for poachers of flora and fauna.

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Offline Slimkitty

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #58 on: August 29, 2019, 07:20:41 PM »


In all the years I have roamed Terlingua Ranch, not once/never/ever has anyone tried to stop me or question what I am doing. Generally, I rarely encounter anyone away from the central part of TR and when I do the most that happens is a wave as we pass each other.

Don't come out to my property then. You will be met with a scantily clad wrinkly old bearded man wearing 1970's Dolphin running shorts, carrying an AK-47, driving an old Jeep, and asking you a whole lot of questions. And my road dead ends.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Big Bend Chat mobile app
It is rare, but if you do happen to encounter Terlingua Man in his native environment, do not exit your vehicle or approach him.  Do not make eye contact with Terlingua Man.  If Terlingua Man attempts to engage with you, strongly insist you are not from the government.  If you cannot safely retreat and must defend yourself, a can of Terlingua Man spray (Pabst blue ribbon, well shaken) might distract him long enough for you to make your escape.  Leave the remaining cans at the edge of Terlingua Manís habitat.
Lol, He's actually a pretty good guy.  And funny.   Pretty lucky to have a such a watch dog neighbor since we're rarely there.  He watches for poachers of flora and fauna.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Big Bend Chat mobile app
Hah!   Man, I seriously thought you were talking about yourself earlier.  Phew!

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Offline Casa Grande

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Re: Terlingua Ranch Road?
« Reply #59 on: August 29, 2019, 08:37:41 PM »


In all the years I have roamed Terlingua Ranch, not once/never/ever has anyone tried to stop me or question what I am doing. Generally, I rarely encounter anyone away from the central part of TR and when I do the most that happens is a wave as we pass each other.

Don't come out to my property then. You will be met with a scantily clad wrinkly old bearded man wearing 1970's Dolphin running shorts, carrying an AK-47, driving an old Jeep, and asking you a whole lot of questions. And my road dead ends.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Big Bend Chat mobile app
It is rare, but if you do happen to encounter Terlingua Man in his native environment, do not exit your vehicle or approach him.  Do not make eye contact with Terlingua Man.  If Terlingua Man attempts to engage with you, strongly insist you are not from the government.  If you cannot safely retreat and must defend yourself, a can of Terlingua Man spray (Pabst blue ribbon, well shaken) might distract him long enough for you to make your escape.  Leave the remaining cans at the edge of Terlingua Manís habitat.
Lol, He's actually a pretty good guy.  And funny.   Pretty lucky to have a such a watch dog neighbor since we're rarely there.  He watches for poachers of flora and fauna.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Big Bend Chat mobile app
Hah!   Man, I seriously thought you were talking about yourself earlier.  Phew!


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