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Rio Grande ever too dry to float?

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Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« on: February 19, 2017, 11:05:07 PM »
I know that flows of the Rio Grande through BIBE vary wildly throughout the seasons and from year to year, but I'm wondering how likely it is that the river would run completely dry or be reduced to unnavigable mud flats at any point between the western boundary near Lajitas and the eastern boundary near La Linda? Particularly during the winter months when flows are lowest. Any thoughts?
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline badknees

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Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2017, 07:04:22 AM »
I know that flows of the Rio Grande through BIBE vary wildly throughout the seasons and from year to year, but I'm wondering how likely it is that the river would run completely dry or be reduced to unnavigable mud flats at any point between the western boundary near Lajitas and the eastern boundary near La Linda? Particularly during the winter months when flows are lowest. Any thoughts?

The answer is yes. See the document below for more info. This may not answer all of your questions, but starting in Section 4, pg 38 there is info on monthly median flows during drought conditions. Looks like April is probably the minimum statistically

https://www.crwr.utexas.edu/reports/pdf/2010/rpt10-06.pdf

Table  4‐3  provides  a  summary  of  median  monthly  flows  during  drought  years  after  1946
(1980‐2009).  The  peak  monthly  median  flow  occurred  in  October  at  13  m3/s  (460  cfs)  and  the
minimum in April at 3 m3/s  (105 cfs). Figure 4‐4 shows  the median monthly  flow under drought
and normal conditions for the post‐1946 period.

Before 1946 - in April, low  flows below 3 m3/s (95 cfs) are likely  to occur once 
every four years. 

After 1946 -  in April, low  flows below 3 m3/s (95 cfs) are likely  to occur once 
every four years. 


« Last Edit: February 20, 2017, 07:13:20 AM by badknees »
Not all those who wander are lost.
– J.R.R. Tolkien

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2017, 10:27:16 AM »
I know that flows of the Rio Grande through BIBE vary wildly throughout the seasons and from year to year, but I'm wondering how likely it is that the river would run completely dry or be reduced to unnavigable mud flats at any point between the western boundary near Lajitas and the eastern boundary near La Linda? Particularly during the winter months when flows are lowest. Any thoughts?

The answer is yes. See the document below for more info. This may not answer all of your questions, but starting in Section 4, pg 38 there is info on monthly median flows during drought conditions. Looks like April is probably the minimum statistically

https://www.crwr.utexas.edu/reports/pdf/2010/rpt10-06.pdf

Table  4‐3  provides  a  summary  of  median  monthly  flows  during  drought  years  after  1946
(1980‐2009).  The  peak  monthly  median  flow  occurred  in  October  at  13  m3/s  (460  cfs)  and  the
minimum in April at 3 m3/s  (105 cfs). Figure 4‐4 shows  the median monthly  flow under drought
and normal conditions for the post‐1946 period.

Before 1946 - in April, low  flows below 3 m3/s (95 cfs) are likely  to occur once
every four years.

After 1946 -  in April, low  flows below 3 m3/s (95 cfs) are likely  to occur once
every four years.

BK you never cease to amaze me with your ability to find the most indepth information!   :notworthy:
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

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Online House Made of Dawn

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  • Golden Eagle
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Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2017, 10:35:39 AM »
Ask BBC and ye shall receive.

BK, you prove once again that you are the data master. That is a fantastically useful link you sent. Thanks!!!
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Online House Made of Dawn

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  • Golden Eagle
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Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2017, 10:43:39 AM »
If anyone has stories of having to portage the river anywhere between Lajitas and La Linda because of a lack of water, I'd love to hear them.
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline Jimbow

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Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2017, 11:15:48 AM »
Wow. But it did take 8 hours. Lol Hats off to BK.

Sent from my SM-G925T using Big Bend Chat mobile app

Everything is in walking distance if you have enough time.

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Online House Made of Dawn

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  • Golden Eagle
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Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2017, 11:17:30 AM »
Wow. But it did take 8 hours. Lol Hats off to BK.

He has to sleep sometime.   :icon_lol:
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline badknees

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Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2017, 12:30:43 PM »
I know that flows of the Rio Grande through BIBE vary wildly throughout the seasons and from year to year, but I'm wondering how likely it is that the river would run completely dry or be reduced to unnavigable mud flats at any point between the western boundary near Lajitas and the eastern boundary near La Linda? Particularly during the winter months when flows are lowest. Any thoughts?

The answer is yes. See the document below for more info. This may not answer all of your questions, but starting in Section 4, pg 38 there is info on monthly median flows during drought conditions. Looks like April is probably the minimum statistically

https://www.crwr.utexas.edu/reports/pdf/2010/rpt10-06.pdf

Table  4‐3  provides  a  summary  of  median  monthly  flows  during  drought  years  after  1946
(1980‐2009).  The  peak  monthly  median  flow  occurred  in  October  at  13  m3/s  (460  cfs)  and  the
minimum in April at 3 m3/s  (105 cfs). Figure 4‐4 shows  the median monthly  flow under drought
and normal conditions for the post‐1946 period.

Before 1946 - in April, low  flows below 3 m3/s (95 cfs) are likely  to occur once
every four years.

After 1946 -  in April, low  flows below 3 m3/s (95 cfs) are likely  to occur once
every four years.

BK you never cease to amaze me with your ability to find the most indepth information!   :notworthy:

"ipsa scientia potestas est"  :eusa_shhh:

University Libraries are full of research papers. I collect and read the ones that pique my interest. I found this one sometime back. It came from The UT Center for Research in Water Resources
« Last Edit: February 20, 2017, 12:50:22 PM by badknees »
Not all those who wander are lost.
– J.R.R. Tolkien

Through the Mirror
http://mirrormagic.com

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Offline Jimbow

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Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2017, 07:24:55 PM »
Skill to do comes of doing; knowledge comes by eyes always open, and working hands; and there is no knowledge that is not power

Sent from my SM-G925T using Big Bend Chat mobile app
Everything is in walking distance if you have enough time.

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Online House Made of Dawn

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  • Golden Eagle
  • Mountain Lion
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  • 2895
  • Backpacking since '78, Big Bend since '95.
Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2017, 01:18:12 PM »
Skill to do comes of doing; knowledge comes by eyes always open, and working hands; and there is no knowledge that is not power

I'm feeling the need to be doing some doing. On the water or on the land, or both.
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline Jimbow

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Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2017, 06:57:27 AM »
My daughter has paddled the Devil's River a couple times. I believe it is a litmus test for boy friends. Not much land but seems like a great Texas float trip.

I've done a couple kayak on the coast trips camping on private land I lucked into.

Sent from my SM-G925T using Big Bend Chat mobile app

Everything is in walking distance if you have enough time.

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Offline Summit

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Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2017, 08:17:29 AM »
I know that flows of the Rio Grande through BIBE vary wildly throughout the seasons and from year to year, but I'm wondering how likely it is that the river would run completely dry or be reduced to unnavigable mud flats at any point between the western boundary near Lajitas and the eastern boundary near La Linda? Particularly during the winter months when flows are lowest. Any thoughts?

The answer is yes. See the document below for more info. This may not answer all of your questions, but starting in Section 4, pg 38 there is info on monthly median flows during drought conditions. Looks like April is probably the minimum statistically

https://www.crwr.utexas.edu/reports/pdf/2010/rpt10-06.pdf

Table  4‐3  provides  a  summary  of  median  monthly  flows  during  drought  years  after  1946
(1980‐2009).  The  peak  monthly  median  flow  occurred  in  October  at  13  m3/s  (460  cfs)  and  the
minimum in April at 3 m3/s  (105 cfs). Figure 4‐4 shows  the median monthly  flow under drought
and normal conditions for the post‐1946 period.

Before 1946 - in April, low  flows below 3 m3/s (95 cfs) are likely  to occur once
every four years.

After 1946 -  in April, low  flows below 3 m3/s (95 cfs) are likely  to occur once
every four years.

BK you never cease to amaze me with your ability to find the most indepth information!   :notworthy:

"ipsa scientia potestas est"  :eusa_shhh:

University Libraries are full of research papers. I collect and read the ones that pique my interest. I found this one sometime back. It came from The UT Center for Research in Water Resources

This paper was written by my dear friend, Samuel Sandoval, who is now a professor at UC Davis.  His doctoral dissertation was on the Río Grande.  He'll be pleased to know his work from his grad school days in Texas is finding an audience.   :great:

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Online House Made of Dawn

  • www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2YJduDyFA4
  • Golden Eagle
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  • 2895
  • Backpacking since '78, Big Bend since '95.
Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2017, 01:13:28 PM »
Summit, that puts a big smile on my face. Next time you talk to Samuel, tell him thanks. We're big into research on BBC, and we depend upon our resident research librarian, badknees, to keep us well-fed.
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline Summit

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Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2017, 02:43:12 PM »
Summit, that puts a big smile on my face. Next time you talk to Samuel, tell him thanks. We're big into research on BBC, and we depend upon our resident research librarian, badknees, to keep us well-fed.
Message delivered!
I actually communicated with Samuel this morning; he happens to be flying in to El Paso this week to give a talk at UTEP on the Big Bend Reach of the Rio Grande. 

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Online House Made of Dawn

  • www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2YJduDyFA4
  • Golden Eagle
  • Mountain Lion
  • *
  • 2895
  • Backpacking since '78, Big Bend since '95.
Re: Rio Grande ever too dry to float?
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2017, 02:49:07 PM »
Summit, that puts a big smile on my face. Next time you talk to Samuel, tell him thanks. We're big into research on BBC, and we depend upon our resident research librarian, badknees, to keep us well-fed.
Message delivered!
I actually communicated with Samuel this morning; he happens to be flying in to El Paso this week to give a talk at UTEP on the Big Bend Reach of the Rio Grande.

Oh, man....you're killing me. I'm all the way over here in Dallas, but I'd give my left arm to attend that talk. But then, sadly, I'd only be able to paddle in circles.  :icon_wink:
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

 


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