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Big Bend Books

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Offline Goldilocks

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Big Bend Books
« Reply #30 on: October 22, 2006, 04:16:13 PM »
Yes Presidio, but she was only stating to me what I think a lot of people believe.  If you watch the media, especially here in North Texas, and that is the only exposure you have to the border issue you can see where her views came from.  I felt that a two minute conversation in the hallway wasn't going to change her mind.  However, I could, and probably should get with her another time and give her some "alternative" viewpoints to consider.  

If I had said what I was thinking at the time, the possibility of further conversation would be over.  I admit I was shocked by the thought that all people with brown skin look alike, but I am hoping I misjudged her comment and she doesn't really believe that.  If she does, there is more understanding and sensitivity to other cultures that needs to be taught.  

I might get on my soapbox here but I believe that our churches should be teaching tolarance and acceptance (maybe like Christ did) instead of intolerance and judgmentalism.  But the process of change is slow, and it is done one person at a time.  

BUT one has to be accepting to teach acceptance.   I have to accept her
where she is before I can lead her to another place.

Anyway, there is a sermon for the day, at least it's SUnday  :D

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chisos_muse

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Big Bend Books
« Reply #31 on: October 22, 2006, 04:38:24 PM »
Quote from: "Goldilocks"
Yes Presidio, but she was only stating to me what I think a lot of people believe.  If you watch the media, especially here in North Texas, and that is the only exposure you have to the border issue you can see where her views came from.  I felt that a two minute conversation in the hallway wasn't going to change her mind.  However, I could, and probably should get with her another time and give her some "alternative" viewpoints to consider.  

If I had said what I was thinking at the time, the possibility of further conversation would be over.  I admit I was shocked by the thought that all people with brown skin look alike, but I am hoping I misjudged her comment and she doesn't really believe that.  If she does, there is more understanding and sensitivity to other cultures that needs to be taught.  

I might get on my soapbox here but I believe that our churches should be teaching tolarance and acceptance (maybe like Christ did) instead of intolerance and judgmentalism.  But the process of change is slow, and it is done one person at a time.  

BUT one has to be accepting to teach acceptance.   I have to accept her
where she is before I can lead her to another place.

Anyway, there is a sermon for the day, at least it's SUnday  :D


And a great sermon it was....... TY Lisa :D

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BigBendHiker

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Big Bend Books
« Reply #32 on: October 22, 2006, 05:22:27 PM »
Quote from: "Goldilocks"
Yes Presidio, but she was only stating to me what I think a lot of people believe.  If you watch the media, especially here in North Texas, and that is the only exposure you have to the border issue you can see where her views came from.  I felt that a two minute conversation in the hallway wasn't going to change her mind.  However, I could, and probably should get with her another time and give her some "alternative" viewpoints to consider.  

If I had said what I was thinking at the time, the possibility of further conversation would be over.  I admit I was shocked by the thought that all people with brown skin look alike, but I am hoping I misjudged her comment and she doesn't really believe that.  If she does, there is more understanding and sensitivity to other cultures that needs to be taught.  

I might get on my soapbox here but I believe that our churches should be teaching tolarance and acceptance (maybe like Christ did) instead of intolerance and judgmentalism.  But the process of change is slow, and it is done one person at a time.  

BUT one has to be accepting to teach acceptance.   I have to accept her
where she is before I can lead her to another place.

Anyway, there is a sermon for the day, at least it's SUnday  :D


Very well stated.  Your words ring true.  Thank you.


BBH

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Lemming_of_the_BDA

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Re: D-Day
« Reply #33 on: January 09, 2007, 06:42:37 PM »
Quote from: "BIBE Webmaster"
Jameson got it wrong; the ceremony did take place in the Oval Office around lunchtime on June 6.

E


So where do you suppose Jameson got the idea? Here, perhaps?

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Offline Goldilocks

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Beneath the Window
« Reply #34 on: February 17, 2007, 10:26:55 PM »
Beneath the Window; Early Ranch Life in the Big Bend Country

I just finished this book by Patricia Wilson Clothier today.  It was a great read.  It was a little sad, though.  It gives the perspective of the ranchers who lost their land to the Park.  I wish that the Park Service hadn't destroyed so many of their homes and buildings but I suppose it made sense at the time. Keeping them up would have been an expensive nightmare.  

Patricia would be about 75 years old now.  She lived her first 15 years on the ranch that eventually became part of the park.  The book was copyrighted in 2003.  Does anyone know if she is still alive?

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Offline bdann

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Big Bend Books
« Reply #35 on: February 18, 2007, 08:19:28 PM »
not 100% sure, but I think she's still alive.
WATER, It does a body good.

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BigBendHiker

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Re: Beneath the Window
« Reply #36 on: February 18, 2007, 08:35:12 PM »
Quote from: "Goldilocks"
I wish that the Park Service hadn't destroyed so many of their homes and buildings but I suppose it made sense at the time. Keeping them up would have been an expensive nightmare.  


So true!  Wouldn't it have been fascinating to see the old buildings and homes from the early pioneers?  


BBH

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Offline astrofizz

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more Big Bend book suggestions
« Reply #37 on: February 19, 2007, 10:44:14 AM »
Four suggestions re Big Bend books that I haven't seen mentioned:
 
(1) An extraordinary art book done in an interesting and personal style.

"Big Bend Landscapes" by Dennis Blagg, TX A&M Univ Press, 2002

I've seen a small number of the originals and/or preparatory sketches for these artworks. Wonderful.
 
 
(2) A recent Laurence Parent / Joe Nick Patoski collaboration that is also visually interesting:
 
"Big Bend National Park", Univ of TX Press, 2006

 
(3) "Exploring the Big Bend Country"
 
by Peter Koch and June Cooper Price, Univ of TX Press, 2007

Esp interesting for Koch's photos and chapter 1, which describes the century plant stalk and bailing wire "raft" that Koch took thru Santa Elena Canyon in 1945. Wow. I have a hard time imaging the Rock Slide in that contraption. But he made it, with camera gear.


(4) And a bird-oriented book with significant Big Bend content:
 
"Texas Bird Adventures in the Chisos Mountains and on the Northern Plains" by Herbert Brandt, published in 1940.
 
As you would likely guess from the title, about half of this 192 page book is about Brandt's visit to the Big Bend in the 1930s.  Brandt was an ornithologist, and this book chronicles one of the first ornithology expeditions to the region. So if you aren't a bird-watcher, this book will probably not be among your favorites. But if you are a Big Bend bird-watcher, you should give it a read. Brandt et al spent time at numerous locations around the Big Bend, including Pine Canyon and Glenn Springs, and they got up into the Chisos (Boot Canyon etc.) via Juniper Canyon and horses. The book was illustrated by the talented George Miksch Sutton.

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Offline astrofizz

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searching for a book
« Reply #38 on: February 19, 2007, 11:07:19 AM »
Some time ago (5 - 6 years, mas o menos), I came across a description of a book that compared Big Bend region photos taken by the 1899 Robert Hill expedition with contemporary photos that matched Hill's photos in composition, field-of-view, etc. When I read about this book, I said to myself "I'd like to buy that" but then I got distracted (as one often does) and by the time I thought of it again, I could not relocate the description of the book or recall its title. Massively irritating. More recently, I have tried to resurrect this book using the power of Google, abebooks.com, and the like. No luck.
 
Does this ring a bell with any of you? Maybe it was a magazine article I saw? I recall it as being very interesting and sure wish I could find it again. I don't think I was dreaming!  :-)
 
Thanks in advance.
 
BTW, Eric Leonard has placed a nice selection of the Hill expedition photos on the BBNP website at:

http://www.nps.gov/bibe/photosmultimedia/rthill.htm

and Eric has provided a link to many others.

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BigBendHiker

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Big Bend Books
« Reply #39 on: February 19, 2007, 09:31:12 PM »
Thanks, astrofizz, for the suggestions.  I edited my original post and added them to the list.  I now have more reading to do! :D

BBH

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BigBendHiker

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Big Bend Book List
« Reply #40 on: March 27, 2009, 07:22:52 AM »
Seeing the recent posts on Big Bend books made me think of this old topic that we had up on the board that listed an almost complete list of books to read about Big Bend and the area.

Enjoy...

Moderator note: I've bumped this topic to the top of the index.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2009, 11:27:34 AM by RichardM »

Re: Big Bend Books
« Reply #41 on: April 10, 2009, 06:36:13 PM »
I might have missed them, but a couple I didn't see on the list (newer titles) - "Ghost Schools of the Big Bend" by Albert Briggs Tucker (deceased), "Federico Villalba's Texas" by Juan Manuel Casas, and I think anyone who is a cactiphile has to love "Cacti of the TransPecos", or at LEAST it's cheaper nephew "Cacti of Texas" (both by Michael Powell and co.).

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Re: Big Bend Books
« Reply #42 on: April 10, 2009, 06:42:51 PM »
And I almost forgot! "Trans-Pecos Texas: A Study of Exploration" by J.P. Burnett. This one was his Master's Thesis, very concise and has some great information on the general history of the entire Trans-Pecos area. Granted, it isn't Big Bend-centric, but (like many of the books on the list) it has information on the region and it's immediate surrounding areas, complete with a nice bibliography for history buffs. Has gone over great with our local history people.

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Offline gjmokcb

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Re: Big Bend Books
« Reply #43 on: September 04, 2009, 12:55:10 PM »
I hope it's not just vanity that prompts me to suggest "The River Has Never Divided Us" (winner, SMU's Clements Center Award for Best Book of 2004 about the Southwest) and "La Junta de los Rios" (winner, Best Book 2008, Texas Old Missions and Forts Restoration Association), both by yours truly, Jefferson Morgenthaler. Both are available at Front Street Books.

Re: Big Bend Books
« Reply #44 on: September 29, 2009, 06:53:36 PM »
I hope it's not just vanity that prompts me to suggest "The River Has Never Divided Us" (winner, SMU's Clements Center Award for Best Book of 2004 about the Southwest) and "La Junta de los Rios" (winner, Best Book 2008, Texas Old Missions and Forts Restoration Association), both by yours truly, Jefferson Morgenthaler. Both are available at Front Street Books.

Hey! Email us, we need more books and I don't think you got my last order!

 


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