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Over-estimating your experience or under-estimating the terrain in a place like Big Bend can result in serious injury or death. Use the information and advice found here wisely. Climb/Hike/Camp/Drive at your own risk.

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Hiking Big Bend National Park- 3rd edition

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Offline mule ears

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Hiking Big Bend National Park- 3rd edition
« on: March 29, 2015, 06:54:27 AM »
Just picked up the just released 3rd edition of Hiking Big Bend National Park by Laurence Parent.  While I have the first two editions this one advertised- "full color photos throughout, GPS coordinates and route profiles, Mile-by-mile directional cues and a Trail finder to help choose the best hike for you"

40 more pages than the 2005, 2nd edition but a lot of that is photos with some new written material.  The biggest change is the large number of really nice photographs and they are all in color.

The trail descriptions are pretty much word for word the same.  A mention of the loss of pinyon pines in the Chisos because of the drought and a description of the new Emory Peak trail junction in the Pinnacles trail description.

There are more trails described in the State Park with Ojito Adentro, Cinco Tinajas, Fresno Rim and Lower Shutup now included.

The only new trail in the Nat. park is the Dorgan-Sublett Trail and of course still no Apache canyon or Cattail falls trail descriptions.

The trail maps are the same but now in color with that crazy Hypsometry which is sort of fancy contour lines.  Same mileage logs and elevation profile charts.  I wish both the maps and the logs would show or mention the campsites in the Chisos.  The only GPS coordinates are for trailheads.

The only mention of the Outer Mountain Loop is in the Juniper canyon and Blue creek trail descriptions.

The trail finder section are lists of Best- easy, moderate and strenous day hikes; Best backpacks; Best hikes for young children and Best hikes for Views.  Nothing unexpected here and probably good info for folks new to the park.

I am sure it was already past the editing process when the new bear canister rules came out this past summer but the only mention of bear canisters is for caching for long distance hikes in the "Water" section

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The parks allow hikers doing long hikes to cache water along the route ahead of time.  If you do cache water for a hike, write your name and expected removal date on the container.  Do not leave water caches in historic buildings or other popular visitor use areas.  Leave food only if it is stored in a commercial bear-proof canister.

This is the same wording as in the 2nd edition.  No mention of the bear boxes at HW or Juniper canyon trailheads.

Overall an improvement and still the only game in town but it could be better with more trail data and detail.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2015, 12:43:12 PM by mule ears »
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

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Offline catz

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Re: Hiking Big Bend National Park- 3rd edition
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2015, 11:07:01 AM »
Where is the Dorgan-Sublett Trail?  Where does it go?
Wake me when it's time to go.

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Offline Jon88

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Re: Hiking Big Bend National Park- 3rd edition
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2015, 12:35:05 PM »
It's on the north side of the road from Castolon to Santa Elena Canyon. It goes up to the Adobe ruins of the Dorgan house and some other buildings.

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Offline Flash

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Re: Hiking Big Bend National Park- 3rd edition
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2015, 12:35:31 PM »
Where is the Dorgan-Sublett Trail?  Where does it go?
Between Castolon and Santa Elena Canyon on the north side of the road.

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Hiking Big Bend National Park- 3rd edition
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2015, 04:20:20 PM »
Where is the Dorgan-Sublett Trail?  Where does it go?
It is just a short half mile trail up onto the flat ridge where the Dorgan house is.  Book says 5.5 miles west of Castolon.
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

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Offline Geezer

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Re: Hiking Big Bend National Park- 3rd edition
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2015, 10:09:06 PM »
Mule Ears,

In Wikipedia, under hypsometric tints, I found the following,

"Some cartographers have suggested that hypsometric tints are often used as decoration, rather than for informational purposes:[4]

    …the current popularity of hypsometric tints has more to do with production ease and pretty colors than it does with our interest in elevation. … With hypsometric tints, the end result is often a map with pleasing colors that blend softly into one another in an orderly fashion, a design trait that people find attractive, even if they don’t necessarily know or care about elevations."

It seems some agree with you. ("crazy Hypsometry") Or are you talking about something else?

Geezer

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Hiking Big Bend National Park- 3rd edition
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2015, 06:31:24 AM »
Mule Ears,

In Wikipedia, under hypsometric tints, I found the following,

"Some cartographers have suggested that hypsometric tints are often used as decoration, rather than for informational purposes:[4]

    …the current popularity of hypsometric tints has more to do with production ease and pretty colors than it does with our interest in elevation. … With hypsometric tints, the end result is often a map with pleasing colors that blend softly into one another in an orderly fashion, a design trait that people find attractive, even if they don’t necessarily know or care about elevations."

It seems some agree with you. ("crazy Hypsometry") Or are you talking about something else?

Geezer

Yep that would be it.  I would say in color they are at least more readable/usable than they were in the 2nd edition in shades of gray.
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

 


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