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What NOT To Do At A Campground

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Offline maketo

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2013, 11:09:43 AM »
I expect no peace and quiet in the Basin or RGV or even Cottonwood.  Too many people crammed into a tiny area.  Same goes for most state parks.

That's one of those things where "normal" people have to lower their standards because of a few fools. Hence, you have come to "expect" that there will be no peace.

At some point in time we have all come to "expect" that going into a natural forest or state or national park is not about enjoying nature but about what I want. Me, me, me. It is not "enjoying Nature" anymore, it is called "recreation". Since the definition has changed, anything can be "recreation" - even taking an OHV or ATV onto a quiet trail to fumigate it with gasoline exhaust and "rape" the land is OK, it's recreation at 30 mph, whatever glimpse of a runaway wildlife you catch is "nature"....

My parents brought me up to be considerate to others. That's what I do when I am anywhere public, I try not to inconvenience others as much as possible. I "expect" the same from others but I do not get it, obviously, every time. However, I do report people all the time who violate these rules, if there is anyone to report to. If I don't, then these people get way without any repercussions and that encourages them to be dumber next time.

The other day we went riding on a trail in Canyon Lake (near Wimberley). It is a 7 mile trail around the lake and there is a clear sign at the entrance that all pets must be on leash. What happens? Three ladies show up horseback, at the entrance with two dogs running free. Now, the dogs were nice BUT these ladies know that, I don't. Plus, they are obviously violating a rule of the trail. I went up and told them that and as usual, they said "thank you" but did nothing about. Then I proceeded to call the corps of engineers that maintains the trail and told them about it, together with the license plate of their truck and trailer.

People have grown to be selfish and inconsiderate. On top of that, when you point it out to them politely, most brush you off like you don't exist. The ones that have gotten away with a lot of stupidity might flip you off too or get in your face, even though they are the ones violating the obvious rules. In some other time and place they would have gotten whipped into shape by someone in 5 minutes and would have been taught a valuable lesson. Nowadays the law protects the stupid and we all reap the consequences.

My $.02

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Offline Homer67

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2013, 01:12:36 PM »
I agree people have little respect for others in this society...so why expect it?

I live by how I was raised and what I believe in and show respectful courtesy to those around me, but I no longer expect ANYONE to act with respect or courtesy. What irks me even more are those who attempt to impose their own "rules" on everyone else, as this article does --- 99% of the time those who wish to impose their wants on others adhere to "do as I say, not what I do" and do not lead by example, which is all any of us can really do.

Want peace and quiet in Big Bend? Get into the backcountry, otherwise don't complain when camping around others. I am no one to tell people how to conduct themselves (as I believe in Freedom), so when in the Basin I just accept the noise and what extremely rare discourtesy may occur.

That said, I do agree with getting the site one has reserved from squatters...
« Last Edit: August 18, 2013, 01:46:36 PM by Homer67 »
Ah Big Bend, we will soon return to reacquaint ourselves in our ritual of blood, exhaustion and dehydration. How can we resist the temptation to strip ourselves of the maladies of civilization?

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Offline maketo

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #17 on: August 18, 2013, 06:46:10 PM »
I am no one to tell people how to conduct themselves (as I believe in Freedom)

I do not disagree with what you wrote. One technical note though, freedom does not come at the expense of someone else. Being rude and obnoxious is not the same as being free :)

OD

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SHANEA

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #18 on: August 18, 2013, 07:40:34 PM »
I have no problem with people being people when at a crowded campground.  Each to his own.  You pack a couple of hundred people into a dense area, then there is going to be noise and confusion - especially with limited services for water and toilets.  If you want solitude, then back country, road side, BGWAM, BBRSP, etc.  Some go to bed late, some get up early.  I mean, music and drunkenness are one thing, but solitude is another - and as I have been told in the past, after about 2 bottles of scotch, my voice does carry...

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Offline Flash

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #19 on: August 18, 2013, 08:03:42 PM »
Sometimes the neighbors in the campground help provide for the general entertainment. Apart from overt rule breakers, people watching can be pretty amusing. Then again, camping is definitely an opportunity to practice the ol' Golden Rule. Once when staying in the Emory Peak lodges, my son and I would later remark on the contrast in people's voices we could hear from next door. One gal had a grating voice that was irritating to overhear as she spoke with her rather quiet husband. Their replacements the next night were two brothers that conversed amiably on the porch in low voices on into the night, while making the contents of their bottle disappear, that were actually pleasant to hear in the background while drifting off to sleep.

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Offline Imre

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #20 on: August 18, 2013, 11:40:26 PM »
Quote
I am surprised the article did not complain about nearby campers who snore.
Last time I camped in the park during Spring break - late '80s or early '90s - I had to pitch my tent in the overflow area. It was unbelievably crowded. Around 2 AM I was awakened by someone shouting at the top of her lungs apparently to the entire campground in general-
Quote
Y'ALL STOP ALL THAT SNORING!!!
It was real quiet for about 20 minutes.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2014, 10:23:10 AM by Imre »
For every complex problem there is a solution that is simple, obvious, and wrong.
- H.L. Mencken

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Offline Casa Grande

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #21 on: August 19, 2013, 06:17:35 AM »
This is why I usually only camp out in the primitive campsites, not adjacent to any other sites.  About 10 years ago, I was camping out at grapevine (never again) and I hear this guy next to me speaking add loud as he can, "hi! Uh ha. I'm in Big Bend National Park. Yes, Big Bend National Park. Big Bend! I know, can you believe it? I'm in the middle of nowhere!" This was the first time I had heard of cell phones working out there.  Needless to say, after enjoying the park's total lack of technology for so many years, it was a real buzz kill.  I'm a pretty snobby camper, I don't wanna see or hear anyone but invitees and my companions after dark. 

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joetrussell

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #22 on: August 19, 2013, 07:44:08 AM »
My wife and I have been going to Enchanted Rock since way back when it was private property. After it was turned into a State Natural Area the number of visitors increased and drove us back into what became the Parks primitive camping areas. So, with more people crowding into a small space you will have a higher percentage of jerks. The worst we experienced was the " happy camper " that went up on Little Rock with his boom box and started playing Metallica at full volume. People that want solitude are driven back into more remote areas, which when you think about it, that is not a bad thing. Some people can't quite handle being outdoors, they have to fill in the silence with their own noise. For the most part the people that frequent Enchanted Rock are a well mannered group.

That is what makes Big Bend, Big Bend Ranch, and hopefully the Chinati Mountains SNA if it ever opens, so valuable. Sometimes the distance involved keeps all the " weekenders " away.

My number 1 thing not to do at a campground, playing music at a volume that escapes your immediate area. If I wanted to listen to the radio I would stay in my car. Fortunately there is not too much of that anymore.

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Offline Jimbow

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #23 on: January 13, 2014, 07:27:12 AM »
I keep telling myself that the rude peple are "helping pay the bills". I blindly assume they are new campers and will eventually be less obtrusive.


hey, I can dream can't I? :banghead:
Everything is in walking distance if you have enough time.

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Offline perterra

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #24 on: January 13, 2014, 08:27:02 AM »
A group of scouts show up at Meridian State park just before dark, before they set up tents or anything they drag a huge TV out of their trailer, then while the scouts set up their tents the leaders connect the surround sound system up. Then as soon as it gets dark we get to hear Die Hard II. At 10:15 I went over and said time to shut her down.

It's why I like camping in bad weather, cold and rain thin the crowds

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Offline Juan Cuatro Lados

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #25 on: January 13, 2014, 08:30:38 AM »
Saw a wonderful, wonderful thing at a campground in Nova Scotia on a bike trip.  A large, noisy bunch of (fill in the blank) came in late, chopped wood, played a radio, whooped it up till 2 or 3 a.m.  True asses.
Next morning about 6 the leader of a troop of Boy Scouts who were camped nearby got all his kids together and had them walk around and around the tent of the noisemakers and bang on pots and pans while they sang "Ring around the Rosie" at the top of their lungs for 15 minutes or so, then they marched away.
The confused and disoriented - probably still drunk - look on the faces of the people who came out of the tent was PRICELESS.

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Offline FatPacker

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #26 on: January 13, 2014, 08:55:24 AM »
Now that is the kind of scout story I like to hear.... much more typical example of how the program should be run than the previous two examples.

we got to do the same sort of thing up at Chickasaw NRA a couple of years ago.
Drunk guy in his truck, revving the motor and yelling at 3 am, with his headlights shining through our campsite for about 30 minutes.  That might have been the only time I was really glad that we had a Troop Bugler..  and the fact he was really bad (but really loud) made it even better at 6:30 am.....
Are we there yet?

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Offline Jimbow

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #27 on: January 13, 2014, 01:28:00 PM »
I can say that my Troop or Crew were among the best behaved when we were camping around other adults. Most Troops are. But any poor behavior from any group of young males and they're Boy Scouts
Everything is in walking distance if you have enough time.

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Offline perterra

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #28 on: January 13, 2014, 05:47:14 PM »
I can say that my Troop or Crew were among the best behaved when we were camping around other adults. Most Troops are. But any poor behavior from any group of young males and they're Boy Scouts

Well they may not have been scouts, but the trailer they hauled all the crap in was a scout troop out of fort worth.

I'm glad yours are better, I have had two bad experenices with boy scouts, and both times it was the leaders who were the biggest issue.

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Offline Jimbow

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Re: What NOT To Do At A Campground
« Reply #29 on: January 13, 2014, 07:00:45 PM »
There are thousands of Troops in Texas and some of the leaders need a lot of training. Unfortunately when done correctly you will never know a good unit was around but everyone knows the bad ones.

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Everything is in walking distance if you have enough time.

 


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