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A grove of Aspen trees?

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Offline 10ftTall&BulletPrf

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A grove of Aspen trees?
« on: June 13, 2006, 09:12:15 AM »
My pal Tim from Dallas was asking if I knew anything about a grove of Aspen trees near the south rim.

I don't recall seeing an Aspen tree grove near the south rim...maybe because I was looking down at my shuffling feet.

Is there an aspen tree grove? Does anyone have a photo?
"You may all go to work and I will go to Big Bend" - If Davy Crockett were alive today.

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Offline Roger, Roger

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A grove of Aspen trees?
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2006, 09:17:08 AM »
I haven't ever heard of Aspens in Big Bend, just a small grove in the Davis Mountains under Mount Livermore...maybe this is what he was referring to?

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Offline Roy

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A grove of Aspen trees?
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2006, 09:49:32 AM »
Cottonwood and aspen are closely related and there's plenty of cottonwoods in BBNP.  Maybe a case of mistaken identity?

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Offline bdann

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A grove of Aspen trees?
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2006, 10:00:48 AM »
Emory Peak is said to hold the southern most stand of aspen in the US.
WATER, It does a body good.

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Offline bdann

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A grove of Aspen trees?
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2006, 10:04:06 AM »
quote from BIBE website

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Another element in the diversity of life in Big Bend is the fact that the Chihuahuan desert is relatively young. The effects of the last ice age were still lingering in the Big Bend only 10,000 years ago, bringing cooler temperatures and more rain than we observe today. Tall Arizona pines, Douglas-firs, Arizona cypress, and aspen, species that are now restricted to the coolest heights of the Chisos Mountains, would have grown abundantly in the middle and upper elevations then. Mexican pinyon pines, oaks, and junipers would have forested the lower elevations. Today they’re found only at elevations above 4,500 feet.
WATER, It does a body good.

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Offline EdB

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A grove of Aspen trees?
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2006, 10:05:44 AM »
Somewhere I was reading that there are aspens (or could be aspens) in BIBE. I did a search of the nps website, and came up with a couple of references.
Although not a surveyor, McDougall argued that "the probability of this higher altitude being correct is borne out by the fact that there is a cluster of aspen trees (Populus tremuloides) at some little distance from the summit on the south slope and one would not expect to find this species in such a position at less than 9000 feet or higher.
Some surprising species living at the very limit of their ranges can be found in the higher, moister areas—bigtooth maple, quaking aspen, and Douglas fir.
Moderator note:  quotes re-formatted for clarity
« Last Edit: October 16, 2009, 11:52:04 AM by RichardM »

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Offline 10ftTall&BulletPrf

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A grove of Aspen trees?
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2006, 10:21:20 AM »
I think that a search expedition is in order.

Grab your cameras!
"You may all go to work and I will go to Big Bend" - If Davy Crockett were alive today.

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SHANEA

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« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2006, 10:48:11 AM »
Quote from: "10ftTall&BulletPrf"
I think that a search expedition is in order.  Grab your cameras!


Keep that camera around your neck at the ready.

Ok, when's the expedition leaving?  I'll nominate you for the expedition leader.

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Offline bdann

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A grove of Aspen trees?
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2006, 11:00:41 AM »
I'll keep my eyes open when I'm up there on my next trip.  

Here's the only clue I can find as to the "where" on these aspen:

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....Just beyond is Laguna Meadow, an open grassy area dotted with pine and juniper, around 3.5 miles from the trailhead.

Pass through the meadow, circling the south-west slopes of Emory Peak, the highest in Big Bend at 7,835 ft. The most southerly stand of aspen in the US grows amongst the boulders on these slopes.


From this page: http://www.onedayhikes.com/Hikes.asp?HikesID=82, the article is describing the hike up to the South Rim via Laguna Meadow.

Don't know if they mean they are on the southwest slope of Emory....or just somewhere on the mountain.
WATER, It does a body good.

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Offline Roy

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A grove of Aspen trees?
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2006, 11:01:29 AM »
Now I remember;  there IS a stand of aspen up there.  It's below the western face of Emory Peak;  you can see it from the summit.

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Offline bdann

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A grove of Aspen trees?
« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2006, 11:17:31 AM »
The "Hiker's Guide to the Trails of Big Bend National Park" also mentions them....

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Just past Laguna Meadow, the trail beings a climb in the direction of Emory peak before intersecting the Colima Trail.  Look among the scattered boulders along the southwest slopes of Emory Peak for quaking aspens, the southern-most stand in the United States.  These trees are the last few remnants from ancient, wetter times thousands of years ago.


That's where I'd read about them being the southern-most in the US.  I keep that little book at my desk at work and reference it all the time.
WATER, It does a body good.

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Offline Casa Grande

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A grove of Aspen trees?
« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2006, 01:01:16 PM »
hm..interesting i've never noticed any

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Offline Joe

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Aspens
« Reply #12 on: June 13, 2006, 01:23:30 PM »
It's possible to see the Aspen grove both from the Pinnacles Trail and Laguna Meadow.

About halfway (maybe more) up the Pinnacles Trail, there's a point with a good view of the drainage between the Pinnacles Trail and the Laguna Meadow trail.  If you look up to the NW slope of Emory you can see the Aspen.

From Laguna Meadow, look up at Emory and you should also be able to see the Aspen.

Someone in the park went and counted every single Aspen many years ago.  I think the total was something like 286. It might mention this in Naturalist's Big Bend, but I don't have my copy at hand.
The real desert is a land which reveals its true character only to those who come with courage, tolerance and understanding. - Randall Henderson

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Offline billh

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aspens
« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2006, 05:29:59 PM »
They can clearly be seen from Laguna Meadow trail to the South Rim. Just after the cutoff to Blue Creek. If you look up to the talus Slope below Emory, you can see a stand of their white trunks. I was thrilled to see them in February, they still had no leaves. The cottonwoods at Mule Ears were fully leafed out already.

bill

 


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