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Milkyway

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Offline Cnieto77

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Milkyway
« on: August 22, 2018, 09:26:18 PM »
I will be going down to BiBe, a couple of nights after the new moon. Will the Milkyway still be visible even if it's not a new moon night?

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Offline The Scorpion

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Re: Milkyway
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2018, 10:04:23 PM »
it all depends on when the moon will be up, what days will you be there? check for moon rise and moon set times to plan your viewing

edit: inserted better link

https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/@z-us-79834

2nd edit.... the milky way will be up at sunset, so as soon as its dark you can see it

« Last Edit: August 22, 2018, 10:09:26 PM by The Scorpion »
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http://jamesb.smugmug.com/BigBendNationalPark/

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Offline GaryF

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Re: Milkyway
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2018, 10:18:48 PM »
Short answer: Should be a great time to see the Milky Way

Long answer:  The moon follows the sun very closely during this phase, and it should set around 9:00pm. And the best viewing time for the Milky Way is a little later in the night when the sky is darker and the Milky Way is higher in the sky. It’s a pretty incredible sight in the dark sky’s of Big Bend.

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Offline Cnieto77

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Re: Milkyway
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2018, 07:13:24 AM »
The dates I'll be there are, arrive on the 14th (evening) and leave the 17th (morning).  I looked online at the possible moon phases for that time period and it is 2 nights past new moon.

Correction it'll be a week after new moon
« Last Edit: August 23, 2018, 07:27:24 AM by Cnieto77 »

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Milkyway
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2018, 07:27:52 AM »
The dates I'll be there are, arrive on the 14th (evening) and leave the 17th (morning).  I looked online at the possible moon phases for that time period and it is 2 nights past new moon.

I've got the new moon on the 7th of Dec. and the moon will be setting after midnight when you are there.  Here is a chart.
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http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

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Offline Hang10er

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Re: Milkyway
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2018, 07:38:30 AM »
Probably a simple question -  Is the Milky Way always present but just unable to always be seen due to conditions?   What "moon" phase is the best for seeing the Milky Way? 

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Offline RichardM

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Re: Milkyway
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2018, 08:57:46 AM »
Probably a simple question -  Is the Milky Way always present but just unable to always be seen due to conditions?   What "moon" phase is the best for seeing the Milky Way?
The sun is in the constellation Sagittarius in December so during November, December and January it is impossible to view the richest part of the Milky Way.  October and February are generally impossible, too. The optimum viewing time in the Northern Hemisphere is in the summer when the sun is on the opposite side of the sky.
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Using a simple tool called a planisphere it is easy to predict when and where to look for the dense part of the Milky Way. But what must also be factored in is the location and phase of the moon. The time of year and the direction of the least light pollution also frame the parameters for getting the best view of the Milky Way. Generally the dense part of the Milky Way is best viewed when it is as high as possible in the Southern sky. Facing south during April and May the pre-dawn hours are best. From June to early August the best time is near midnight, though the Milky Way will be visible almost all night. From Mid August through September the best time is soon after the sun has set and the sky has grown dark.

More useful info:
https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-blogs/astronomy/viewing-the-milky-way/70002029
https://www.matjoez.com/2018/04/01/milky-way-season-explained/

Every star you can see with the unaided eye is located within the milky way. The only object you can see (without optical aid) in the sky outside of the milky way is the Andromeda Galaxy. Andromeda is over 2.5 million light years from earth; much too far to resolve individual stars without a powerful telescope.

But when most people talk about “seeing the milky way”, they are talking about the core of the galaxy. Located in the constellation Sagittarius, this is the brightest part of the milky way. Dust lanes, nebulas, and star clusters are all more concentrated in this area.

Speaking from personal experience, you can see the Milky Way in December, just not the "core".
« Last Edit: August 23, 2018, 09:13:22 AM by RichardM »

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Offline Hang10er

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Re: Milkyway
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2018, 12:56:57 PM »
Thanks for finding that Richard.

That makes it so simple.

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Offline badknees

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Re: Milkyway
« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2018, 01:26:08 PM »
Definitely best in the summer.

First picture was from August and the second was from November

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Offline ggowins

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Re: Milkyway
« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2018, 04:12:25 PM »
When I took my cousin's sons out to Big Bend a couple of years ago, we headed to Alpine for the 4th of July to watch a baseball doubleheader and then the fireworks in the park afterwards.   We got back to our campsite in the Basin well after midnight, and when we got out of the car, the older one just said "WHOA".  It was his first time seeing the Milky Way.  He asked if we could stay up and view it.  I told him "NO!  It is way past your bedtime!"  Then we laughed and stayed up for another hour viewing the sky. 

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Offline Jalco

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Re: Milkyway
« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2018, 08:35:54 PM »
When I took my cousin's sons out to Big Bend a couple of years ago, we headed to Alpine for the 4th of July to watch a baseball doubleheader and then the fireworks in the park afterwards.   We got back to our campsite in the Basin well after midnight, and when we got out of the car, the older one just said "WHOA".  It was his first time seeing the Milky Way.  He asked if we could stay up and view it.  I told him "NO!  It is way past your bedtime!"  Then we laughed and stayed up for another hour viewing the sky.

My son's first visit to the Bend was when he was 16.  Arrived late on a moonless night.  He stepped out of the car, craned his face upward, then, after a moment, turned and said, "Thanks, Dad".  Magical stuff, starlight is.

 


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