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West of the Pecos...."Where Am I?"

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Offline Roy

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West of the Pecos...."Where Am I?"
« Reply #30 on: July 03, 2006, 10:22:11 AM »
To me, "West of the Pecos"  refers to an area that was difficult to access and govern from the population centers in central and east Texas.  Few Anglos lived there until the late 1870s when the Comanche were finally defeated at Palo Duro Canyon;  the first railroad was the Southern Pacific line completed in 1883.  Judge Roy Bean, The Law West of the Pecos, was actually hired by the Southern Pacific to maintain order while the railroad was being built.  Ties to Mexico and the American Southwest remained stronger that ties to Austin for a long time.  Discovery of oil in the Permian Basin did a lot to change that.

The Big Bend area basically extends roughly from around Sanderson to Alpine down to Presidio;  a large part of the southern Trans-Pecos.

This is pretty much a subjective opinion based on my own reading, etc..
Joe could probably give you a lot more facts.

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Offline Joe

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Trans-Pecos
« Reply #31 on: July 03, 2006, 10:40:17 AM »
Quote from: "Roy"
This is pretty much a subjective opinion based on my own reading, etc..  Joe could probably give you a lot more facts.


Nope, nothing to add...I think your description is right on.  I'm headed east of the Pecos today...got to go collect my steak dinner from Chisos_Muse and PJ Jon   :D
The real desert is a land which reveals its true character only to those who come with courage, tolerance and understanding. - Randall Henderson

http://www.bigbendchat.com/portal/forum/el-saloacuten/joe-a-memorial/

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SHANEA

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Re: TOO EASY
« Reply #32 on: July 03, 2006, 11:03:20 AM »
Quote from: "EdB"
..refer to the area as West Texas Trans Pecos Big Bend region


Quote
It rolls off the tongue nicely.   It looks "neat" in print.  It Kinda sings - kinda like "Provo's Privy" (What Movie?).  Heck, I don't know.  Thanks for asking. (I'm glad someone asked!)  :D  I'm not sure if I made it up or borrowed it from someone or read it somewhere.  Knowing me, I made it up.    It actually covers three regions - "West Texas" - to me anything West I-35 (DFW/Austin/San Antonio) - "Trans Pecos" - the Trans Pecos region of Texas - encompassing the area West of the Pecos River - and of course the "Big Bend Region" - the area of West Texas down near the bend in the river.  Yea, it's probably redundant - but as I said - I like the way it rolls off the tongue and since I type fast I can type it out in no time.  It conveys a "feeling" that I get when heading West from East.  One of the great things about living in East Texas is that when I go West I get to traverse most of the ecoregions of Texas - all except the coastal.
Doing a Google search on "west texas trans pecos big bend region" I find only no occurances, so I'll claim it as my origional :idea:

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Offline Roy

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Re: Trans-Pecos
« Reply #33 on: July 03, 2006, 11:09:25 AM »
Quote from: "Joe"
Quote from: "Roy"
This is pretty much a subjective opinion based on my own reading, etc..  Joe could probably give you a lot more facts.


Nope, nothing to add...I think your description is right on.  I'm headed east of the Pecos today...got to go collect my steak dinner from Chisos_Muse and PJ Jon   :D


Driving 300+ miles for a steak;  no place but Texas :D

Hope the weather holds out for you;  this mess we're getting on the coast is supposed spread into the Hill Country later today.

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SHANEA

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Re: Trans-Pecos
« Reply #34 on: July 03, 2006, 11:13:58 AM »
Quote from: "Joe"
I'm headed east of the Pecos today...


Ah, heading to the Central Texas Region.  I'd say come on up and enjoy the fireworks show, but it is a long haul from there to here, especially on a holiday weekend.  Be careful of all the idgets on the road - I also hear that DPS is running it hard - dang near had a head on with one on the last most excellent adventure - somewhere West of DFW of was running the other side and decided to do a "flip" - he was a little over zealous and came bouncing out of the median right at me - I had to lock em up - he swung it around and went off to get his quota.  Really PO'd me.     Keep a sharp eye out for BDann and his brother KDann driving that aquamarine pickup, although they are not scheduled to head home until the 4th....

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Offline Windchime

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Re: Figured...
« Reply #35 on: July 03, 2006, 02:08:49 PM »
Quote from: "SHANEA"
Quote from: "Windchime"
for fireworks...


I figured ya'll were under a burn ban and a fireworks ban out that way? :oops:


Someone has checked with the Sheriff's Office and were told that what we intended to shoot was legal. Have not heard of the county putting a ban in place. I checked the area papers last week online and there was no mention of a ban on fireworks that I could find.
The opinion expressed above is my own and not that of the National Park Service or the Federal Government.

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SHANEA

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Houston Chronicle...
« Reply #36 on: July 03, 2006, 03:08:42 PM »
Article in this weekends Houston Chronicle paper regarding how Fire Cracker vendors were trying to sue regarding firework bans in certain locales.  

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/headline/metro/4016960.html

One good quote from the article was
Quote
"There's nothing patriotic about burning down people's houses," Diamond said.

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Online Al

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Re: Close Enough
« Reply #37 on: July 04, 2006, 12:43:41 AM »
Quote from: "Al"
Gave the Trans-Pecos thing the Boot!   :lol:

Don't know how I did that but I did.  Meant to cut and paste this link:

http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/TT/ryt2.html

Al


Here's an interesting part of the extremely long TSHA article:

The combination of clear skies, high altitudes, and southerly location enable the Trans-Pecos to receive the highest mean annual solar radiation of any location within the United States (data from faulty sensors had previously placed the maximum at China Lake, California, in the Mojave Desert). At lower elevations in the Rio Grande valley below Candelaria some of the highest temperatures in the United States are frequently recorded. In general, the Trans-Pecos exhibits some of the highest average maximum temperatures found in Texas during the winter (second only to the Gulf Coast) and some of the lowest average temperatures in summer (second only to the Panhandleqv). Large diurnal ranges are common in all seasons, and frosts occur frequently in winter, even at low elevations. Aridity imposes a major constraint on vegetation in the Trans-Pecos. Soils, topography, temperatures, and precipitation variations impose secondary controls that produce significant variations in vegetation from place to place within the region. Desert grassland, the most widespread vegetation type, occupies the lowlands between about 3,600 feet and 4,600 feet. Desert shrubs, particularly creosote bush, occupy the lowest elevations, and there are indications that this type of vegetation has been expanding upslope throughout the region as a result of grassland disturbance over the last 100 years. At higher elevations the desert grassland grades into open woodland. Dense woodland is generally restricted to the higher elevations of the Davis and Guadalupe ranges. Scattered throughout the region are smaller areas of riparian, holophytic, and other vegetation types adapted to specific site conditions. Upland soils are generally shallow and unproductive. Even the deeper alluvial soils of the basins are frequently too saline to be very productive. The Rio Grande is the world's twentieth largest river in volume, the fifth largest in North America, and the only significant surface stream in the Trans-Pecos.

 


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