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What's the story Morning Glory?

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Offline JeffB

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What's the story Morning Glory?
« on: October 11, 2006, 08:52:59 PM »
Found this bloom on the trail to Cattail Falls.  Looks like Heavenly Blue Morning Glory.  The plant contains Lysergic Acid Amide, similar to LSD.  Called Tlitliltzin by natives, this plant was used (and probably still used) in shamanic rituals.  


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History
Morning Glory seeds called tlitlitzin were used ritually by the Aztec for their psychoactive properties. Spanish chroniclers in the mid 16th century reported on the divinitory use of these seeds. Their use has continued in southern Mexico, although it wasn't until about 1900 that tlitlitzin was identified botanically as Morning Glory.


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PRESENT USE of the sacred Mexican morning glory seeds differs little from ancient practices. The seeds are used for divination, prophecy, and diagnosis and treatment of illness by many tribes, especially the Chatinos, Chinantecs, Mazatecs, and Zapotecs. In almost all Oaxacan villages, the seeds serve the Indians "as an ever present help in time of trouble."

The modern ceremony, featuring the use of morning glory seeds to treat an illness, is a curious blending of old Indian beliefs and Christianity. The native who is to be treated collects the seeds himself. About a thimbleful of the seeds—often the magic number is 13— is measured out. The seeds are ground by a virgin, usually a child, in a special ritual accompanied by complex prayer. Water is added, the resulting beverage is strained, and the patient drinks it at night in silence. After more prayers, he lies down with someone by his side who listens to what he says while intoxicated. This determines the cause of his troubles.
Jeff Bullard
Dallas, TX

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BigBendHiker

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What's the story Morning Glory?
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2006, 08:58:51 PM »
Thanks for posting.  Interesting information and a great photograph.


BBH

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Offline Vince T

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Re: What's the story Morning Glory?
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2006, 10:41:04 AM »
Quote from: "JeffB"
After more prayers, he lies down with someone by his side who listens to what he says while intoxicated. This determines the cause of his troubles.


Sounds better than modern science!
Vince

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Offline Casa Grande

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What's the story Morning Glory?
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2006, 11:36:31 AM »
and it tastes awful.....

...or so I've heard  8-[

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Offline tjavery

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What's the story Morning Glory?
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2006, 12:13:38 PM »
Awesome, Jeff! That is a beautiful bloom. I too found one on the same trail about two years ago. I guess that's a good area to find them.


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Offline rebelusmc65

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What's the story Morning Glory?
« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2006, 02:22:47 PM »
that look like one of the pics i posted a while back and could not get tidentafi4eed thanks for the id it is a beautiful bloom

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Offline BIBEARCH

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What's the story Morning Glory?
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2006, 11:59:24 AM »
The species is Ipomoea lindheimeri and it occurs within an area between the Hill Country and the Big Bend and into one county in New Mexico. It is listed as a sensitive species in the park and is documented from only three locations within the park. Seed collecting would certainly do harm to these populations, possibly to the point of extirpation. I would hate to see this beautiful plant disapper from the park.

Here are some links to information about I. lindheimeri.

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=IPLI

http://www.natureserve.org/explorer/servlet/NatureServe?init=Species
On this latter link, you will need to type in the species name Ipomoea lindheimeri to open the data on the plant species.
The opinion expressed above is my own and not that of the National Park Service or the Federal government.

"Government of the people, by the people, for the people . . . people hey, that's us!"? - Swami Beyondananda

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Offline marfa1954

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natural high
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2006, 07:23:47 PM »
yeah, i'm an old hippie and a pretty good herbalist and have to say if you want to trip get some x from your nephew or somebody.  most of the plants like morning glory, woodrose, and sophora can be powerful psychedelics but you have to know fairly precise harvest times because as the seeds mature they fill up with highly toxic alkaloids that cause powerful cramping and nausea and suppress the autonomic nervous system to the point you risk death because your body forgets to breathe.  if you have to try this stuff, don't ever do it alone, and tripping is just another level of intoxication anyway, that altered reality is fun but just more maya.  and don't go looking for virgins on the internet, they're all cops!          hooray for light beer!

 


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