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Yet Another One of the Dorgan House....

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Offline Casa Grande

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Yet Another One of the Dorgan House....
« Reply #15 on: March 02, 2007, 07:01:32 AM »
Quote from: "Roy"
Quote from: "BIBEARCH"
the ability of Big Bend to compete against parks like Mesa Verde, Chaco Canyon, etc. for the limited available funds.

I know that several sites, Chaco in particular, had some kind of affiliation with an organization that provided volunteers (who paid for the privilege) to preform restoration work after suitable training.  Can't remember their name;  think they were out of Philadelphia.  Has BIBE ever tried something like this?


sign me up! I'd do it for sure.....

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Offline BIBEARCH

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Yet Another One of the Dorgan House....
« Reply #16 on: March 02, 2007, 08:55:06 AM »
Quote from: "homerboy2u2"
You would be very surprised BIBEARCH to see what people in small towns around this area can do with Adobe blocks.


I'm actually quite familiar with adobe architecture. If you travel to Presidio/Ojinaga, you can see some of the mid-eastern methods of building arches and domed roofs. Simon Swann traveled extensively in the far and middle east, studying centuries-old masonry and has directed adobe construction in Ojinaga and her own personal home in Redford.

A neighbor of ours was also featured in the local annual tour of homes in Terlingua. See http://www.bigbendgazette.com/ for her dome on the cover of the February 2007 issue of Big Bend Gazette.

Adobe is not only a most flexible and adaptive building medium, multi-storied adobes in China, Turkey, Syria, and north Africa have been standing and occupied for over 700 years. Some of the most beautiful architecture in the world is made of adobe.
The opinion expressed above is my own and not that of the National Park Service or the Federal government.

"Government of the people, by the people, for the people . . . people hey, that's us!"? - Swami Beyondananda

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Offline presidio

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Yet Another One of the Dorgan House....
« Reply #17 on: March 02, 2007, 09:53:25 AM »
Quote from: "BIBEARCH"
Adobe is not only a most flexible and adaptive building medium, multi-storied adobes in China, Turkey, Syria, and north Africa have been standing and occupied for over 700 years. Some of the most beautiful architecture in the world is made of adobe.


And most of the great earthquake tragedies have occurred in these areas, due to unreinforced construction. Not much of an issue in the US as long as building codes are adhered to....bond beams and such. Of course, the stabilized blocks also are much more resistant to crumbling when severely shocked.
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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
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--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline BIBEARCH

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Yet Another One of the Dorgan House....
« Reply #18 on: March 02, 2007, 10:53:57 AM »
Quote from: "presidio"
Quote from: "BIBEARCH"
Adobe is not only a most flexible and adaptive building medium, multi-storied adobes in China, Turkey, Syria, and north Africa have been standing and occupied for over 700 years. Some of the most beautiful architecture in the world is made of adobe.


And most of the great earthquake tragedies have occurred in these areas, due to unreinforced construction. Not much of an issue in the US as long as building codes are adhered to....bond beams and such. Of course, the stabilized blocks also are much more resistant to crumbling when severely shocked.


Nice thing about adobe is that if it does crack in an earthquake, it's simple enough to clean out the crack and stuff more adobe in to close the hole.

The opinion expressed above is my own and not that of the National Park Service or the Federal government.

"Government of the people, by the people, for the people . . . people hey, that's us!"? - Swami Beyondananda

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Offline homerboy2u

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Yet Another One of the Dorgan House....
« Reply #19 on: March 02, 2007, 11:20:51 AM »
One thing i have discussed with the Adobe brick makers around the small towns here, is that they seldom use straw bale in the process.

  I asked a couple of them why not?, in general they said , with time (years to be exact) the strawbale will rotten and leave the space in the adobe empty making the A-brick weak. It really made me think of the process and to me, it sounded pretty much with sense.

 I wonder what you have to say about this, BIBEARCH. :?
Stay thirsty, my friends.

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Offline RichardM

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Yet Another One of the Dorgan House....
« Reply #20 on: March 02, 2007, 12:27:52 PM »
Quote from: "homerboy2u2"
One thing i have discussed with the Adobe brick makers around the small towns here, is that they seldom use straw bale in the process.

  I asked a couple of them why not?, in general they said , with time (years to be exact) the strawbale will rotten and leave the space in the adobe empty making the A-brick weak. It really made me think of the process and to me, it sounded pretty much with sense.

 I wonder what you have to say about this, BIBEARCH. :?

I'm not Tom, but I believe that straw (as opposed to hay) shouldn't have too many problems with rot.  The quality of the straw probably has a lot to do with durability.  Of course, I only know what I've read on the internet. :)
Quote from: "[url
http://www.greenbuilder.com/sourcebook/strawbale.html[/url]"]It is important to recognize that straw is the dry plant material or stalk left in the field after a plant has matured, been harvested for seed, and is no longer alive. Hay bales are made from short species of livestock feed grass that is green/alive and are not suitable for this application.

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Offline BIBEARCH

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Yet Another One of the Dorgan House....
« Reply #21 on: March 04, 2007, 11:16:12 AM »
Quote from: "homerboy2u2"
One thing i have discussed with the Adobe brick makers around the small towns here, is that they seldom use straw bale in the process.

  I asked a couple of them why not?, in general they said , with time (years to be exact) the strawbale will rotten and leave the space in the adobe empty making the A-brick weak. It really made me think of the process and to me, it sounded pretty much with sense.

 I wonder what you have to say about this, BIBEARCH. :?


It sounds like your adobe masons are talking about not using straw in the adobe mixture. Our local maestros use horse or burro manure and have not had problems with it rotting inside the adobe, particularly if the wall plaster/stucco is maintained properly.


Straw bales come from the second cutting of wheat, oats, or rice. The feed is cut first and the second cut is baled up in construction-grade two-string or three-string bales. These are tighter than HAY bales because they are often made to bear the weight of the roof system. I chose to only use the straw to fill in between the posts in a post and beam frame system.



The bales are set on a concrete footing 18 inches wide, 12 inches thick, steel reinforced. A vapor barrier is constructed on the footing that keeps ground moisture from migrating up into the bales.





A moisture barrier is also put along the base of the walls and below all window openings to prevent rain-splash from soaking through the stucco coat and soaking into the bales.



Once the stucco is applied, it seals off the bales completely. As long as the stucco coat is intact, moisture doesn't get to the bales, insects don't get into the straw, termites are not a problem, and the bales remain intact. There are 200-year old straw bale houses in England where the climate is much wetter than here and they have no problems with the bales rotting inside the wall. Considering the humidity here stays around 10 to 20 percent most of the time, I wouldn't worry about the bales rotting either.
The opinion expressed above is my own and not that of the National Park Service or the Federal government.

"Government of the people, by the people, for the people . . . people hey, that's us!"? - Swami Beyondananda

 


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