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Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back

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Offline Flash

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Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« on: July 15, 2011, 09:59:56 PM »
My son and I are hoping to stay in the High Chisos in mid-August (if it ever rains enough!  :eusa_pray:) and are trying to plan how to carry enough water for 2 or 3 nights.  :eusa_think: So guys, how does a mere mortal carry that much water?  :eusa_doh: Do you just drop a couple gallon Ozarka jugs in your pack and go? Strap/lash a 2.5 gallon container to your frame?  :willynilly: How's it done?  :eusa_eh:

PS - I imagine that at his point, Boot Spring and all others are likely bone dry...  :eusa_boohoo:

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Offline Al

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2011, 10:51:31 PM »
This has been discussed in detail but I can't readily find the thread.  I lean toward more smaller containers in the pack,  as well as a couple of liters outside the pack with one handy while hiking.  This allows for more even weight distribution and better knowledge on exactly where you are in water consumption.  Two liter soda bottles are very sturdy, work great and are very cost effective if you or someone you know drinks soda water.

Al

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Offline Raoul Duke

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2011, 08:38:35 AM »
"Camelback" style bladders are also very effective, because they are pliable and can conform to fit almost any packing situation.  A standard one holds about 3 liters of water and takes up a surprisingly small amount of room.  I usually take one of these along with numerous 1-liter lexan bottles.
 
I would avoid gallon plastic jugs of water because they are difficult to pack and take up lost of room even after the water is gone.  As pointed out above, smaller containers allow you to better distribute the water load in your pack.
"Getting bored with your neurosis?  Drop you analyst--drop him/her like a cold potato--and make tracks for the nearest river." -Edward Abbey

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Offline elhombre

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2011, 09:01:10 AM »
We have had these bags for 10 years now and have not had one leak yet.  We have bought the spigot cap for each one because if you tighten the original one down too tight, it tends to bust the plastic lip.

http://www.amazon.com/MSR-Dromedary-Handle-Liter-Black/dp/B000XRHDN2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1310824155&sr=8-1

Campmor has them also.  http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___87707

The nice thing about them is that they roll up when empty in your pack.  And some water filter systems come with a plastic cap fitting which inserts into the mouth so that it takes only one person to fill up a bag with pumped water.  We bought the "dromlite" version once, but it was truly light weight and made us think it wouldn't hold up to being crammed into a pack with pointy stuff too well.   Finally, you don't have to fill them up all the way so they only take up the minimun amount of space needed in your pack.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2011, 09:24:02 AM by elhombre »
If other countries on the planet want to see America suffer and ultimately destroyed, who are they cheering for right now?  Trump, or the leftist democrats and their media supported hate machine?

Seek out the facts for yourself.  Begin by using Startpage.com,  not google.

May God Bless America!

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Offline Cookie

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2011, 09:39:35 AM »
Flash- How old is your son? That will make a difference on how much water YOU carry. My daughter is 7 so she carries minimal weight, maybe a liter in her pack with a few snacks. Me and my husband(EL Hombre) split the rest of everything. I love the camelback systems too.

I am a firm believer in making your water work for you. We bring the individual Gatorade powders to add to a 20 oz. Gatorade we bring with us. We usually drink at least 2 a day on backpacking trips. If you are sweating a lot  and it's hot, you need to get some electrolytes in you with your water. There are several brands to try and they don't take up a lot of room. It's also nice to drink something besides water when you are out on a multi-night trip. Check out this thread

http://www.bigbendchat.com/portal/forum/hiking-the-desert/electrolytes/

If you don't have hiking poles.....GET THEM!! They ease 15-20 % of the weight on your knees and ankles. If you are hauling water up to the rim for 2-3 nights, I would not hike without them.

~Cookie

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Offline Flash

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2011, 12:18:09 PM »
elhombre - The MSR Dromedary bag looks great. Hmm 4 or 6 liters... :eusa_think:

Cookie - My son is 13, 80-lbs, wirey, but athletic. A couple Gatorades each sounds like a good idea.

QS - Those electrolytes are an interesting idea.

Al - I have a 3L hydration pouch, plus a bunch of 1/2 L and 1 L bottles.

Thanks to all for the input!  :icon_mrgreen:

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Offline Al

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2011, 10:12:10 PM »
elhombre - The MSR Dromedary bag looks great. Hmm 4 or 6 liters... :eusa_think:

Cookie - My son is 13, 80-lbs, wirey, but athletic. A couple Gatorades each sounds like a good idea.

QS - Those electrolytes are an interesting idea.

Al - I have a 3L hydration pouch, plus a bunch of 1/2 L and 1 L bottles.

Thanks to all for the input!  :icon_mrgreen:

I have a MSR 4 liter Dromedary bag and it is great.  If you are going to buy one I would buy the 6 liter rather than the 4 liter if you plan extended hikes.  You don't have to fill it up all the way unless you need to.  You can strap it on the outside of your pack so it doesn't shift while hiking.  There is an attachment you can buy to pump water through a filter directly into the bag which is real nice when hiking for several days and you need to refill.  Please report back after your hike!

Al

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Offline Al

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2011, 11:14:39 PM »
P.S. Having taken numerous 3 or 4 day zone camping trips in the desert I still don't have the experience to hydrate directly off of a large bladder while hiking.  The concern is consuming water more rapidly than realized.  The large bladder should be considered reserve water and its use measured because of the importance of knowing how much water you have at all times. If you get one, consider the bladder your tank and meter it through 1-liter bottles.  That way you always know where you stand on water without unpleasant surprises later in the hike. 

Bang for the buck it's still hard to beat a 2 liter soda bottle for weight vs. water capacity! When empty put the empty bottle in a trash bag with the other spent camping residue tied to the outside of the pack.

Al

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2011, 07:28:23 AM »

Bang for the buck it's still hard to beat a 2 liter soda bottle for weight vs. water capacity! When empty put the empty bottle in a trash bag with the other spent camping residue tied to the outside of the pack.

Al

Al is right about cost and weight with the soda bottles.  They are hard to pack because they are round.  I am also a fan of multiple containers in case one springs a leak, you won't be out of water all of a sudden.  I have been using the 2 liter Platypus bottles (they used to be 80 oz. or 2.5 liters but they may have changed them to 70 oz. now) as my reservoirs and filling a 1 liter soda bottle up as the drinking bottle.  The nice thing about the Platys, aside from light weight and they are totally flat when empty, is they are lens shaped so pack nicely in the pack next to each other.  Cost is about the same per liter as the MSR Drom bags.



This is 11 liters for 2 plus days, 23 pounds just in water!  But only 6 oz. in containers.
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

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Offline Al

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2011, 11:53:31 PM »
ME, a step up from soda bottles for sure.  Excellent advice as always!

Al

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Offline JRD

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2011, 09:26:51 PM »
Keep in mind, if you are coming from lower altitude and higher humidity (which of course you are) if you don't up your water intake as soon as you get into the area you will be already dehydrated at the trail head.

I try to drink like crazy in the days before heading out and then try to float my back-teeth before hitting the trail.

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Offline Flash

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2011, 10:38:28 PM »
So far purchased:

2 - 3-liter Osprey hydration units
1 - MSR 10-liter dromedary
2 - 2-liter Platypus bottles

Total of 20-liters ==> 5 gallons  :icon_eek:

Okay, time to hide the credit card...  :icon_rolleyes:


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Offline Al

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2011, 10:48:18 PM »
So far purchased:

2 - 3-liter Osprey hydration units
1 - MSR 10-liter dromedary
2 - 2-liter Platypus bottles

Total of 20-liters ==> 5 gallons  :icon_eek:

Okay, time to hide the credit card...  :icon_rolleyes:

Money in the bank.  Water is golden in the desert. 

Load the kid up, he'll thank you later!

Al

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Offline JRD

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #13 on: July 18, 2011, 11:16:22 PM »
43 pounds of water?

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Offline Flash

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Re: Carrying Large Quantities of Water on Your Back
« Reply #14 on: July 18, 2011, 11:43:21 PM »
43 pounds of water?

... for two people for two+ days  :icon_smile:

 


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