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Rescue Kit

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Offline Hang10er

  • Black Bear
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  • "Do what you want before it's too late"
Rescue Kit
« on: August 19, 2019, 06:58:42 AM »
Roadtrip just started a thread asking what's in everyone's first aid kit.  Great topic.  I'm right in the middle of Parent's "Death and Rescue in Big Bend".  So on a similar topic - what do you carry for rescue?  I know there's a lengthy thread/discussion on PLB's, so other than that.

Signal mirror
Whistle
Maps

 

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Offline miatarchy04

  • Jack Rabbit
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Re: Rescue Kit
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2019, 08:38:31 AM »
I "think" I've got mirror and whistle in my pack. They're so small and seldom used (i.e. never) they tend to get lost. I'd add matches or a bic lighter to start a fire which provides a kind of smoke signal for SAR. They have applications other than rescue situations but then again so does a map.

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Offline Flash

  • Mountain Lion
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  • 2053
Re: Rescue Kit
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2019, 08:46:46 AM »
Space blanket
Fire starter stick
Micropur tablets


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Offline Keepa

  • Coyote
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Re: Rescue Kit
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2019, 09:43:59 AM »
Like many other things, the answer is "it depends." In this case, it depends on the environment you will be in. Is it mountains? Desert? Jungle?  Cold? Hot?

Also, the question is misleading. Strictly speaking, the only thing you need for a rescue is communication with your rescuer. So the question should really be: what do you carry to survive until help arrives?

And that goes back to the environment you will be in, which you should research thoroughly before setting out. Which means information, you need knowledge to survive.

Carry what you need to survive in the environment you will be in for as long as you think help would take to arrive, or for you to extract yourself.

Generally, you need the essentials, tailored to your environment:

Map
Compass
Whistle
Signal mirror
Sunglasses and sunscreen
Extra clothing
Headlamp or flashlight
First-aid supplies
Firestarter
Matches
Knife
Extra food

Or, using Dave Canterbury's system, the ten Cs of survival:

Cutting
Combustion
Cover
Container
Cordage
Candlelight
Cotton Bandana
Compass
Cargo Tape
Canvas Needle

Add Calories (food) and Communication (phone or PLB) to the above.

The above are categories of tools and equipment. For example, candle light means an illumination device, such as a flashlight or lantern. Cover means clothing, tent and sleeping bag.

Your "rescue" kit is actually your survival kit.

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Offline Keepa

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Re: Rescue Kit
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2019, 09:50:20 AM »
I "think" I've got mirror and whistle in my pack. They're so small and seldom used (i.e. never) they tend to get lost.

A whistle, and a few other things, should always be on your person, because it is possible for you to lose access to your backpack (such as losing it, or falling and breaking your back).

The best survival kit is useless if you can't access it when you need it.

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Online presidio

  • Soaptree Yucca
  • Mountain Lion
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Re: Rescue Kit
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2019, 04:31:22 PM »
Signal mirror

A signal mirror is a must-have item (along with a lot of other things), especially in the desert where a flash can be seen forever.

Of course, it helps to know how to use it (which is very simple).
_____________
<  presidio  >
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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline Hang10er

  • Black Bear
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  • "Do what you want before it's too late"
Re: Rescue Kit
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2019, 07:39:19 AM »
I agree that "communication with your rescuer" is important.  Heck, be nice to send him a text saying "I'm over here, to your left".  I understand survival needs, the space blanket, first aid supplies, extra food.

What I was trying to hit on more, is things that you can carry that will help the rescuers find you.  In "Death and Rescue In Big Bend" there are several cases where you have live victims lost or trapped and you have rescuers out searching.  What can you do to increase the odds that they will find you.  Time can be important.  The William Egger story details how close rescue  crews were to him, but had not spotted him.  A simple mirror, flare, strobe light maybe. 

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Offline Keepa

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Re: Rescue Kit
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2019, 09:26:47 AM »
I agree that "communication with your rescuer" is important.  Heck, be nice to send him a text saying "I'm over here, to your left".  I understand survival needs, the space blanket, first aid supplies, extra food.

What I was trying to hit on more, is things that you can carry that will help the rescuers find you.  In "Death and Rescue In Big Bend" there are several cases where you have live victims lost or trapped and you have rescuers out searching.  What can you do to increase the odds that they will find you.  Time can be important.  The William Egger story details how close rescue  crews were to him, but had not spotted him.  A simple mirror, flare, strobe light maybe.
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You need signalling devices. Again, this depends on where you are.

Audio devices:

Whistle
Air horn
Telephone
Personal locator beacon (the InReach has two way communication)
Fire crackers

Visual devices:

In open areas a signal mirror, but carry it always anyway because it weighs only an ounce
Orange colored clothing (as much as possible)
Orange bandanna
Orange colored balloons and dental floss (inflate them, tie them down and float them over your location).
Fire starter, to create a smoke signal
Signal flare
Railroad flare (doubles as bear defense)

The time factor can be mitigated by a well thought out survival pack, customized for the particular environment.

If you are in the Chisos mountains, where visibility is low, audio devices would be the best. If you are in the desert where visibility is high, visual devices would work better.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2019, 09:50:39 AM by Keepa »

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Offline GaryF

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Re: Rescue Kit
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2019, 10:02:00 PM »
Iím a bit of a flashlight nerd, so I always have an led light with a bright, attention getting strobe, plus enough battery to run it for at least 12 hours. Very effective at night, but marginal in full daylight.

These items go on every trip:
Flashlight with bright strobe
Emergency whistle tied to an outside cord on my pack. 
Something blaze orange, item varies depending on conditions. In hot weather itís just a 2íx2í piece of nylon.
Some way to light a fire. Usually this is my stove kit.

Edit:  Should add that I always have my phone. It may or may not help depending on coverage, but itís too expensive to leave in the car, and I use it as my GPS / Gaia topo mapping for occasional navigation help.

Iíve got a Delorme INReach that Iíve yet to activate / carry, but I have a couple of remote trips in mind that I will most definitely use it on.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2019, 10:09:13 PM by GaryF »

 


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