Friends of Big Bend National Park
Big Bend Conservancy

Over-estimating your experience or under-estimating the terrain in a place like Big Bend can result in serious injury or death. Use the information and advice found here wisely. Climb/Hike/Camp/Drive at your own risk.

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Fire & Water Source Information

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Offline waveone

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Fire & Water Source Information
« on: August 17, 2018, 07:36:16 PM »
Howdo all,

Great Forum!

Planning my first trip to BBNP though I am a Native Texan. What a beautiful place that exhibits the rugged, open range and diverse beauty of our Great State, my goodness.

My questions of which there are many, initially revolve around information sources of general regulations information, in addition to information on locations wherein groundfire is allowed - if at all. In addition to information regarding natural water sources such as springs and their viability for drinking.

There are many other questions in regard to most popular months, sites topo maps and so forth.

Thank you for all input. It is greatly appreciated   

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Offline elhombre

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2018, 08:57:25 PM »
There are NO ground fires allowed in the national park.  As for the water, look at the forum and the sticky in "Trip Reports".  Many people have used the springs as sources before, so if you have a hiking plan, you can post it.  Then someone may be able to give you good info about the availability of water.

Here, at the top of the page http://www.bigbendchat.com/portal/forum/your-trip-reports/

The park will be "completely" full on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Texas Spring Break.  Depends on where you are staying.  Backpacking or Car camping.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2018, 09:03:49 PM by elhombre »
First Russian Collusion, then Mueller, then Obstruction, then illegal payment to Stormy Daniels, then tax returns. Now no formal vote on impeachment for a 30 min. phone call to Ukraine

No crime. No evidence, just more secret investigations

Drain the Swamp.  America will survive.  God Bless America

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Offline badknees

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2018, 09:15:23 PM »
Ground fires and wood fires are prohibited throughout Big Bend National Park. Charcoal is allowed in grills in campgrounds. You may have a fire in a fire pan while on a river trip, or use a containerized fuel stove for backpacking.

If you have a fire pan on the riverbank, you can dispose of the ashes in the main river channel, but must pack out any unburned charcoal. You ate permitted to collect and burn dead, downed wood in the pan.. This is only permitted along the river.
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Offline waveone

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2018, 09:29:51 PM »
Thank you both. I was just about to post that my third search was successful on the inquiry about groundfires though it is a bit of a let down

Understandable but camping backcountry without a fire is almost anti climactic so to speak for cooking heat source and atmosphere of enjoyment.
Perhaps there are other ways in which to enjoy the evenings with freshly cooked , hot food and no fire.   

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Offline elhombre

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2018, 09:51:45 PM »
Once you get out there and take a look around, the fire thing makes complete sense. 

Big Bend is one of the darkest places in the US.  Sitting around and staring at a fire at night is the same as looking at your phone.  You miss so much going on in the night sky that you can't experience any where else.
First Russian Collusion, then Mueller, then Obstruction, then illegal payment to Stormy Daniels, then tax returns. Now no formal vote on impeachment for a 30 min. phone call to Ukraine

No crime. No evidence, just more secret investigations

Drain the Swamp.  America will survive.  God Bless America

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Offline waveone

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2018, 10:06:41 PM »
Once you get out there and take a look around, the fire thing makes complete sense. 

Big Bend is one of the darkest places in the US.  Sitting around and staring at a fire at night is the same as looking at your phone.  You miss so much going on in the night sky that you can't experience any where else.

I understand but part of camping has been a fire in my back country experience as well as star gazing, That deep into the wilderness away from civilization does not affect the brilliance of the night sky. I've hunted many remote back- country areas where the closest paved road was at least 25 miles away and the nearest town another 45miles. Sometimes even more remote. Beside that , in open country in cooler months a heat source is just about indispensable- even in Texas

In either case, curious as the rule is they are the rules which motivates me to re think my approach to things. A dark camp is something I'd need to get used to       

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Offline Al

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2018, 10:19:05 PM »
We've used a double burner infrared heater that mounts on a 20 pound propane tank for many years.  It will keep several people warm even in very cold conditions.

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Offline Jalco

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2018, 10:30:07 PM »
Campfires are allowed at the adjacent Big Bend Ranch State Park, if a fire you must have.  Same wide open skies as the national park.

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Offline waveone

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2018, 10:42:03 PM »
Appreciate the information but a zone area camp or possibly a back country area accessible by truck is what we are looking for. I want to avoid as many crowded places as possible.

Clearly I 'm in need of an education on camping and back packing in where no fire is allowed. in colder months how do you all stay warm as ide from multiple layers of clothes and a jet boil to cook minimal amounts of food?     

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Offline dprather

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2018, 11:54:44 PM »
The "cold" in the Bend is not like cold in many other parts of the state.  I'm from SE Texas.  The cold in the Bend doesn't penetrate like humid cold. 

The sun is so bright that cold temps are deceivingly warm to me. 

If you are exerting yourself (backpacking; strenuous hiking) that will warm your body well into  the night. 

On a 35-degree sunny day in the Bend, while backpacking, I'm much more comfortable than a typical 50-degree winter day in SE Texas.





Leave "quit" at the car.  Embrace the trail as your friend.  Expect to enjoy yourself, and to be amazed.

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Online mule ears

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2018, 07:24:56 AM »
Appreciate the information but a zone area camp or possibly a back country area accessible by truck is what we are looking for. I want to avoid as many crowded places as possible.

Clearly I 'm in need of an education on camping and back packing in where no fire is allowed. in colder months how do you all stay warm as ide from multiple layers of clothes and a jet boil to cook minimal amounts of food?   

waveone welcome to BBC, you are in for a good time!

Find a campsite with a great view and slip your legs down into your down bag with a warm coat and hat and you are good to go, a chair kit helps with back support.  Notice no tent, never a tent.   :icon_biggrin:  Like this:



or like this (20 degrees that morning):



or this, a bit warmer this night:



While in the comfortable reclining position fire up the stove and cook a nice pot of food, followed with a hot drink or some bourbon or both. 



They don't call 9:00 backpackers midnight for nothing.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2018, 07:42:17 AM by mule ears »
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

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Offline Jalco

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2018, 08:45:10 AM »
Appreciate the information but a zone area camp or possibly a back country area accessible by truck is what we are looking for. I want to avoid as many crowded places as possible.

Don't let the "state park" monniker fool you.  You won't find "crowded" at BBRSP. 

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Offline waveone

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2018, 09:56:57 AM »
Big Thank You to you all....

Mule ears that's hardcore my friend. Props to you. My preference is a bit more of a "homie" camp even packing but that is me. I've done the week long pack- in on hunts and including overnight stay under the stars because of long stalks or simply just not planning as well(oops) and spending the night out under the stars in a cold camp in sub freezing temps in areas few humans travel if at all in recent years. Not always fun.

Backpacking on hikes for me should be perhaps a bit more relaxing. Either way all makes for  good memories. Nothing like thriving in natures environment in spite of conditions. Few folks are willing go through the rigors of learning to do it, let alone try it.       

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Offline waveone

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #13 on: August 18, 2018, 09:59:09 AM »
Appreciate the information but a zone area camp or possibly a back country area accessible by truck is what we are looking for. I want to avoid as many crowded places as possible.

Don't let the "state park" monniker fool you.  You won't find "crowded" at BBRSP.

Good to know my friend. Love wide open spaces with sparse human contact except the occasional run in with a kindred spirit type. Makes for nice company

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Offline Hang10er

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Re: Fire & Water Source Information
« Reply #14 on: August 18, 2018, 12:25:54 PM »
I'd think you'd benefit from reading some of the trip reports on here.  Read the epic tales written by House Made of Dawn or Desert Rat Shorty and countless others.  If you want almost no human contact or the occasional kindred spirit type, you'll have it all here. 

Ditto on those that said the cold in Big Bend is not the same as elsewhere.  It is so much more bearable.  I also agree with no need for a fire.  I too love to camp around a fire.  It's a way to cook (BBQ) and the spot to gather and socialize.  Out there you not only don't need it, but after awhile you just feel so much more a part of the desert when you don't have it. 

 


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