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Scariest Moment In Big Bend?

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Offline bdann

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Scariest Moment In Big Bend?
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2006, 03:47:17 PM »
1. Caught in a thunderstorm at Laguna Meadow.  It was loud and we were pretty frightened at first.  Then it starting hailing and it sort of became comical, we couldn't help but just laugh at the situation.  Even though it was a little scary, at the same time it was a cool experience.

2. Dead battery at the Fresno backcountry campsite opposite the Mariscal Mine.  You'd think we wouldn't have any problem getting help being so close to the mine, but think again.  We were there in early December, on a weekday.  The dead battery was completely our fault, we left something on in the truck overnight.  I actually woke up during the night and immediately realized our mistake.  Truck wouldn't even start to turn over.
We had planned on being there another night anyway, so we didn't panic or anything.  
I went out and sat down in the road with a book, as the site is too far from the road to wave anyone down.  I sat out there for about four hours, then walked back to camp for lunch.  After lunch I didn't feel much like sitting in the road anymore, so I just cracked opened a beer and sat down.

Late in the afternoon I heard a vehicle coming, so I ran down to the road, it was way ahead of me, luckily they stopped at the mine.  I caught up with them about half way up.  I scared the crap out of them, they didn't see me coming.  I told them the story, when I pointed our our campsite, which you can barely see from the mine, they were clearly shocked I'd run that far to catch up with them.  Anyway, I walked back to camp, they went on up to the mine.  About an hour later they drove over to our camp, they were in a rented van and didn't have cables.  They also didn't seem too keen on helping us or speaking with us, etc.  It was an older couple and their grandkids, and understandably I think they were a little spooked.  So they were going to report us to a Ranger.  I don't remember what time it was, but we thought maybe someone would come that afternoon, but no one did.
So next morning, the day we were planning on leaving the park, we get up, pack the truck, get ready to go....and wait.  No one came that morning.  Finally around Noon a really nice guy and his son came along in a truck (I'd been back at my position in the middle of the road).  They were very friendly and got us going in about five minutes.

So those are my stories, not very scary.
WATER, It does a body good.

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Offline Casa Grande

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Scariest Moment In Big Bend?
« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2006, 03:52:36 PM »
Quote from: "bdann"
1. Caught in a thunderstorm at Laguna Meadow.  It was loud and we were pretty frightened at first.  Then it starting hailing and it sort of became comical, we couldn't help but just laugh at the situation.  Even though it was a little scary, at the same time it was a cool experience.

2. Dead battery at the Fresno backcountry campsite opposite the Mariscal Mine.  You'd think we wouldn't have any problem getting help being so close to the mine, but think again.  We were there in early December, on a weekday.  The dead battery was completely our fault, we left something on in the truck overnight.  I actually woke up during the night and immediately realized our mistake.  Truck wouldn't even start to turn over.
We had planned on being there another night anyway, so we didn't panic or anything.  
I went out and sat down in the road with a book, as the site is too far from the road to wave anyone down.  I sat out there for about four hours, then walked back to camp for lunch.  After lunch I didn't feel much like sitting in the road anymore, so I just cracked opened a beer and sat down.

Late in the afternoon I heard a vehicle coming, so I ran down to the road, it was way ahead of me, luckily they stopped at the mine.  I caught up with them about half way up.  I scared the crap out of them, they didn't see me coming.  I told them the story, when I pointed our our campsite, which you can barely see from the mine, they were clearly shocked I'd run that far to catch up with them.  Anyway, I walked back to camp, they went on up to the mine.  About an hour later they drove over to our camp, they were in a rented van and didn't have cables.  They also didn't seem too keen on helping us or speaking with us, etc.  It was an older couple and their grandkids, and understandably I think they were a little spooked.  So they were going to report us to a Ranger.  I don't remember what time it was, but we thought maybe someone would come that afternoon, but no one did.
So next morning, the day we were planning on leaving the park, we get up, pack the truck, get ready to go....and wait.  No one came that morning.  Finally around Noon a really nice guy and his son came along in a truck (I'd been back at my position in the middle of the road).  They were very friendly and got us going in about five minutes.

So those are my stories, not very scary.


you know, what is it with people??  You were obviously distressed and in real trouble...to just leave someone in that situation in the middle of nowhere is inhuman.....if it had been me, I would have had cables, but even if I didn't, I would have driven you to Rio Grande Village and back again with some cables and/or a battery.....i hope those folks have plenty of good karma in there moral bank account, they'll sure need it!

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Offline bdann

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Scariest Moment In Big Bend?
« Reply #17 on: June 12, 2006, 04:15:03 PM »
Quote from: "David Locke"


you know, what is it with people??  You were obviously distressed and in real trouble...to just leave someone in that situation in the middle of nowhere is inhuman.....if it had been me, I would have had cables, but even if I didn't, I would have driven you to Rio Grande Village and back again with some cables and/or a battery.....i hope those folks have plenty of good karma in there moral bank account, they'll sure need it!


On our previous trip, about six months prior, we'd come across a couple that had gotten their pickup stuck in the sand down by the river near the Solis campsite.  It was pure chance we even found them.  We were cruising down the River Road and turned down the Solis access road just for the heck of it. We didn't even go all the way down to the river where they were, we were turning around heading back to the River Road when we heard them honking their horn.  We figured it was either someone messing around or someone in distress so we went to check it out.  These poor people were stuck really bad in the sand.  What's worse is they were way off the road and we didn't have enough rope to attempt to pull them out without risking getting ourselves stuck.  We did have a shovel and tried to dig them out for about an hour.  It was extremely hot and the metal handle on the shovel actually got too hot to hold in your hands.  
They had no water, a couple bottles of coke in a styrofoam cooler, some canned beans, and a couple sleeping bags, nothing else.  We offered to off load some of our gear so there would be room and take them to RGV, but they elected to stay and wait.  So we gave them a bunch of water and gatorade and headed to RGV.  When we got to the store, they put us on the phone with a Ranger, we gave them the scoop then headed back to Solis to let them know help was on the way, then we headed back to our camp.
We saw them the next day at RGV, they looked pretty happy to be back on the paved road.  I always wonder if they got a ticket for being off the road.
WATER, It does a body good.

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Ray52

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The rest of the story?
« Reply #18 on: June 12, 2006, 07:29:17 PM »
Quote
The SUV had apparently been there awhile


I haven't spent enough time in the park to have my own scary moment, but you all have had some good ones.  I've got to ask Doc Savage, did you ever get an explanation for the abandoned SUV?

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SHANEA

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Seems Like
« Reply #19 on: June 12, 2006, 10:10:27 PM »
Quote from: "bdann"
1. Caught in a thunderstorm at Laguna Meadow.


Seems like a lot of BIBErs get caught there in a thunderstorm with hail!

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SHANEA

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Re: The rest of the story?
« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2006, 10:11:39 PM »
Quote from: "Ray52"
I haven't spent enough time in the park...


Let's load up and go!

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Ray52

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Scariest Moment In Big Bend?
« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2006, 10:40:58 PM »
The spirit is willing but I don't see it happening until late fall to early winter.  I think anything more than a weekend between now and then isn't likely.  But let's try to head up to Caddo for one of those, or someplace else fuel-tank friendly.  FYI....did you see the Beaumont Enterprise article today about the proposed reservoir on the Neches???

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Offline dave2

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Scariest Moment In Big Bend?
« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2006, 08:57:53 AM »
About the dead battery problem in the back country campsites, I worry about this and carry one of those booster pack battery deals with me as well as an air compressor.  I've never used the battery pack on my own car but I know they work because I've jumped started others with battery trouble.  They are really good to have if your camping with only one truck and can't count on anyone to jump start you.

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SHANEA

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Wondered...
« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2006, 09:19:44 AM »
Quote from: "dave2"
About the dead battery problem


Funny you should mention that.  My Avalanche experienced battery problems the minute I got home from the most recent most excellent BIBE adventure.  Total battery failure.  It must have started up at the Basin as I got an electrical warning light one morning.  I just rebooted the Avalanche and it went away.  Fortunately it was under GM's warranty @ 100%.   Gosh, I'd have hated for it to totally fail while out on the river road, might still be there 3-4 weeks later.  Heck, I'd really hate for it to fail anywhere out there or any place else for that matter except my driveway - where it did fail :!:      

I think I'll pick up one of them there battery starting things to add to the 2.5 tons of gear that I carry once I rejoin the work force.  What "brand/model" do you suggest?

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SHANEA

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Neches...
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2006, 09:23:05 AM »
Quote from: "Ray52"
FYI....did you see the Beaumont Enterprise article today about the proposed reservoir on the Neches???


Yes I did, GREAT NEWS  :!: it made the front page here.    I'll see if I can find the article on-line and post it off-topic.

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Offline 10ftTall&BulletPrf

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Scariest Moment In Big Bend?
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2006, 09:23:17 AM »
My scariest moment was in 1999 getting caught in a freak ice storm while hiking the South Rim solo.

It had been 80 degrees + on the morning that I started the hike so, not wanting to haul unnecessary cr*p, I left the long jeans, jackets, sleeping bag liner etc behind. At about 11pm, the cold front came in like a freight train dropping the temps down into the 20s with high wiinds and freezing rain. I just buried myself in the bottom of my sleeping bag for whatever warmth I could muster.

At first light, I broke camp to head back. Everything was covered in at least a half inch of ice. I will post a photo I took of a prickly pear covered in ice as soon as I can scan it...it's one of my favorites. It was a long slippery hike down the trail.

When I checked in at the ranger station, the ranger said, "Got a little cold up there last night, huh?" I responded "Yep". He then went on to say, "I thought about grabbing the horses and heading up there to check on you but I figured I'd wait until this morning to see if you came down."  :shock:
"You may all go to work and I will go to Big Bend" - If Davy Crockett were alive today.

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SHANEA

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G.P.L.P.
« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2006, 10:06:54 AM »
Quote from: "10ftTall&BulletPrf"
caught in a freak ice storm


Quote
G.P.L.P. :?:


Weather anywhere in Texas, but most especially in the desert can be astounding.  Guess what, if you'd have carried all the cr*p up there, the weather wouldn't have changed - the law of camping/backpacking.

Astounding to watch a thermometer as the weather transitions from daylight - dusk - night in the desert especially.  I remember we were camped at BBRSP in the R2D2 camper and watched the digitial thermometer just plummet one evening - the digital indicator was just plummeting from the 80's and finally settled into the 30's.

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Offline Doc Savage

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Re: The rest of the story?
« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2006, 10:13:33 AM »
Quote from: "Ray52"
I've got to ask Doc Savage, did you ever get an explanation for the abandoned SUV?


Nope, that was my first trip in 97 and I wasn't familiar with how to followup. It was on my way out of the park that I reported the incident. Lately I've spent over a week in the park and not had my reciept get bleached totally white like that. That SUV must have been parked there for awhile. Given my knowledge of the area now and the emergency training that I've received, I'd handle that situation completely differently now.

Robert
Enjoying the Texas life!

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Offline bdann

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Scariest Moment In Big Bend?
« Reply #28 on: June 13, 2006, 10:14:11 AM »
Quote from: "dave2"
About the dead battery problem in the back country campsites, I worry about this and carry one of those booster pack battery deals with me as well as an air compressor.  I've never used the battery pack on my own car but I know they work because I've jumped started others with battery trouble.  They are really good to have if your camping with only one truck and can't count on anyone to jump start you.


My last trip in March, at the last minute I grabbed the battery from my other vehicle and packed it into my truck.  No way was I going to repeat the dead battery situation.  

I need to pick up one of those emergency battery things.  Just need to find one I can really depend on.  The guy that gave us the jump (from my story above) actually had one of those things and tried to get us going with it, but it didn't work.
WATER, It does a body good.

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Offline bdann

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Re: G.P.L.P.
« Reply #29 on: June 13, 2006, 10:19:13 AM »
Quote from: "SHANEA"


Astounding to watch a thermometer as the weather transitions from daylight - dusk - night in the desert especially.  I remember we were camped at BBRSP in the R2D2 camper and watched the digitial thermometer just plummet one evening - the digital indicator was just plummeting from the 80's and finally settled into the 30's.


No doubt about that.  Same thing in the other direction in the morning, camping out in the desert in the summer....as soon as the sun comes up...you're sweating.
WATER, It does a body good.

 


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