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Over-estimating your experience or under-estimating the terrain in a place like Big Bend can result in serious injury or death. Use the information and advice found here wisely. Climb/Hike/Camp/Drive at your own risk.

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Weighing gear

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Online roadtrip

  • Roadrunner
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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2019, 07:02:12 PM »
Duly noted! Thanks for the feedback. Saw t.p. all up and down the last stretch of Brazos I floated earlier this spring. Disgusting. Plenty of loose sand to dig there and leaves and sand to fill back up. Not so much Big Bend I reckon. I will bring the trowel. Never understood how some of the same people who enjoy the outdoors have no problem trashing it out. Rest assured I will do the right thing.

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Offline DeserTrek

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #31 on: September 09, 2019, 11:33:34 AM »
In regards to rain gear, I always carry a rain jacket just not rain pants.  I have no issues rocking my base layers as pants. Been there done that. That said, I recommend that you get lighter pants that don't absorb and hold water. I switched from Prana Zion pants to RailRaiders Eco Mesh and the drying time was pretty significant. Also, The side zips allow more air flow for quicker drying as well.

https://www.railriders.com/men-eco-mesh-pant-with-insect-shield-p-837.html

I was skeptical of inflatable sleeping pads as well, but I have to say all three of my Thermarest pads have been bombproof. I even cut two of them to reduce weight and resealed with an iron. Leaks are not really a concern as long as you use appropriate care. That said, I use a thin GG foam pad underneath all my pads, as well as Tyvek. Also, stay away from Polycryo its crap.

https://www.gossamergear.com/collections/sleeping-pads/products/thinlight-foam-pad

Do yourself a favor and buy some biodegradable toilet paper or just use natural resources.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000JFTDPE/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1


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Offline Lissa

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #32 on: September 09, 2019, 08:55:18 PM »
So have in fact gotten caught in that cold, wet rain in the bend. Like you it seems to follow me around :) Am Not opposed to rain layers if they are I tended as part of your warmth layering, you just seemed to have a lot.  And throw a couple newspaper bags in your pack - they can cover your hands and make them waterproof in a cold rain, or over dry socks in camp if you have wet shoes. (I realize these maybe arenít highly likely in the Bend, but itís effective and very light weight, so I generally tuck them down into a pocket.)

For lightweight trowel the deuce of spaces is good.  The aluminum is thin and can kind of cut into your hand, so I use it as the place to wrap / store my spare duct tape.

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Offline dprather

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #33 on: September 09, 2019, 10:53:44 PM »
Screw the scale thing.  Put up your inventory list of ALL you plan to carry, and most of vultures can critique you with what you NEED, and what you should consider a LUXURY item.  Every item in backpacking needs to go through the litmus test of need, or simply taking said item to make the trip easier.  That way you can make the decision if you really want to carry it or not.    But be fore warned, there are many hyper sensitive  nerds out there who internalize the weight they carry when backpacking as if it is a reflection on their inner-self worth in this world we live in.  They will look down their noses at others who don't care about an extra # or two as if they some how are better because others are too stupid and carry heavy.  A 3 oz. difference in weight of a stove makes or breaks their backpacking experience.  I buy lighter stuff, (for more money), but I don't search out the lightest stuff just for the sake of it being the lightest.

Your best weight savings in the desert will ultimately come down to water management.

It really is about suffering.  Does the benefit of the suffering out-weigh the effort.    For me, I experience a geometric proportional increase in enjoyment when compared to the suffering.  And I will continue backpacking as long as that condition persists.

This is my approach.  I only take what I have to take and then I just deal with it.  "What I have to take" gets less and less after every trip. 
Leave "quit" at the car.  Embrace the trail as your friend.  Expect to enjoy yourself, and to be amazed.

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Online roadtrip

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #34 on: September 18, 2019, 03:11:21 PM »
So have in fact gotten caught in that cold, wet rain in the bend. Like you it seems to follow me around :) Am Not opposed to rain layers if they are I tended as part of your warmth layering, you just seemed to have a lot.  And throw a couple newspaper bags in your pack - they can cover your hands and make them waterproof in a cold rain, or over dry socks in camp if you have wet shoes. (I realize these maybe arenít highly likely in the Bend, but itís effective and very light weight, so I generally tuck them down into a pocket.)

For lightweight trowel the deuce of spaces is good.  The aluminum is thin and can kind of cut into your hand, so I use it as the place to wrap / store my spare duct tape.
Thanks for the ideas. The only time I didn't take rain gear in the fall on a camping trip, it rained. A lot. And got pretty cool. Was not in the forecast.
I ran across this suggestion for rain gear on an ultralite backpacking website. Made out of Tyvek.  6.4 oz
https://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=36377

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #35 on: September 18, 2019, 04:25:36 PM »
So have in fact gotten caught in that cold, wet rain in the bend. Like you it seems to follow me around :) Am Not opposed to rain layers if they are I tended as part of your warmth layering, you just seemed to have a lot.  And throw a couple newspaper bags in your pack - they can cover your hands and make them waterproof in a cold rain, or over dry socks in camp if you have wet shoes. (I realize these maybe arenít highly likely in the Bend, but itís effective and very light weight, so I generally tuck them down into a pocket.)

For lightweight trowel the deuce of spaces is good.  The aluminum is thin and can kind of cut into your hand, so I use it as the place to wrap / store my spare duct tape.
Thanks for the ideas. The only time I didn't take rain gear in the fall on a camping trip, it rained. A lot. And got pretty cool. Was not in the forecast.
I ran across this suggestion for rain gear on an ultralite backpacking website. Made out of Tyvek.  6.4 oz
https://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=36377

Don't wear that but do google Froggs Toggs or Driducks and get one of their cheap coats, they are usually available at Dicks sporting goods, even walmart.  About 5-6 oz and much better breath-ability if you ever have to take it out of the pack.
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

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Offline Keepa

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #36 on: September 19, 2019, 09:04:58 AM »
Thanks for the ideas. The only time I didn't take rain gear in the fall on a camping trip, it rained. A lot. And got pretty cool. Was not in the forecast.
I ran across this suggestion for rain gear on an ultralite backpacking website. Made out of Tyvek.  6.4 oz
https://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=36377

That Tyvek rain suit is not a bad idea, actually, because it can double as a ground sheet to sit on, or even a foot print for your tent.

I am going to get one. At $7.50 it's nothing.

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Online Flash

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #37 on: September 19, 2019, 09:26:38 AM »
Time for Teletubbies  :icon_smile:



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Offline Keepa

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #38 on: September 19, 2019, 12:54:02 PM »
Time for Teletubbies  :icon_smile:

Teletrekkies  :icon_biggrin:

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Offline VivaTerlingua

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #39 on: September 19, 2019, 03:42:57 PM »
Thanks ElHombre.
If the forecast looks moderate when I'm fixing to leave the car at the trailhead, I'll ditch some of the extra clothes and rain gear. I'm taking a large ziplock to put the toilet paper/trash in. I'm hoping to find one that is some shade of color and not clear so I can easily distinguish it from my other baggied items. For a trowel i was planning on using the heel of my boot. Water plan: Leave the trailhead with 4 liters, reup at Fresno, Juniper springs, and boot spring. I hope to take up DeserTrek on his offer to cache some at the Juniper trailhead.  That stretch between Fresno and Upper Juniper may be a little too far without resupply. I will definitley be taking your gear suggestions under consideration.

Looking Good!

I would get a Titanium cup with a lid for ALL cooking and hot drink needs.
https://www.amazon.com/TOAKS-LIGHT-Titanium-Ultralight-Version/dp/B00CYA26BU/ref=pd_cp_468_4?pd_rd_w=uIKrp&pf_rd_p=ef4dc990-a9ca-4945-ae0b-f8d549198ed6&pf_rd_r=K42FXPD1AT356PE1FXYG&pd_rd_r=4ec21bb6-ab13-49bf-9612-200e0fc56d6d&pd_rd_wg=9y2b5&pd_rd_i=B00CYA26BU&psc=1&refRID=K42FXPD1AT356PE1FXYG

I too would only bring rain pants if the weather forecast says it may rain.  One headlamp is good with no extra batteries if you start with new ones.  Just be sure the headlamp has the locking feature, and you know how to use it so that it doesn't accidently get left on.  Either way, most headlamps can stay on for 60+ hours on new batteries.

Base layer shirt and wool shirt are too much.  Wool shirt would be my only choice.  If it gets cold, you can put on your wool shirt, hiking shirt, jacket AND your rain coat.  4 Layers!    Base layer pants may be too much.  Only bring them if you know it will be very cold.  You most likely won't stay up long enough at night to need them.  2nd pair of socks can act as your gloves if you need any.

Water filter AND tablets are a good choice just in case the filter craps out on you.  Emory quad is nice becaue it really helps a person figure out where they are on the Dodson trail.  Also, if you climb a hill to watch the sunset, you can pick out features labeled on the map. 

There are plenty of "stake hammers" laying around on the ground in the form of rocks.  Tooth paste is a luxury, but I always bring a brush. 

Does the pocket rocket come with a Pizzo lighter?  If so, just get a small backup lighter and leave the matches at home.  My small lighter fits inside the MSR plastic container with the pizzo and stove.

You didn't mention anything for trash, used TP, used baby wipers, or shovel for a poop hole??  Also, have you looked at a neck warmer before?  Doesn't weigh much.  It's good to keep you much warmer in the wind, and you can pull it over your eyes in the morning to get a little extra sleep.  https://www.walmart.com/ip/Zan-Headgear-Microfleece-Neck-Warmer-Black-OSFM/442656531

What's your water plan?  How much are you going to carry and where will you resupply?

I was on Juniper Canyon trail over Labor Day and didn't see water in Upper Juniper Springs.  I didn't spend too much time looking since I had enough water with me, but I wouldn't rely on it unless we get more rain.

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Offline elhombre

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #40 on: September 19, 2019, 04:06:28 PM »
Did you go and look at the rock where the spring comes out from?
First Russian Collusion, then Obstruction, then illegal payment to Stormy Daniels, then tax returns subpoenaed. Now no formal vote on impeachment for a 30 min. phone call to Ukraine

No crime. No evidence, just more secret investigations

Drain the Swamp.  America will survive.  God Bless America

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Offline Reece

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #41 on: September 20, 2019, 07:19:25 AM »
And I thought ďbase weightĒ was everything loaded in your pack minus food and water.
Ditch the extra clothes especially the heavy stuff. Hike in your clothes donít carry them. Get a cheap down jacket, much warmer for the weight. You can resort  to it on a cold morning, wear it inside your bag if it gets too cold at night or use it for a nice pillow in its stuff sack.

Amazon Essentials Men's Lightweight Water-Resistant Packable Puffer Jacket, Grey, ... https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BN72RF2/ref=cm_sw_r_sms_c_api_i_KhmHDb9VR9DZT



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Offline Reece

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #42 on: September 20, 2019, 07:21:00 AM »
Odd to see Upper Juniper dry and water running at the Boot Canyon pipe.


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Offline Reece

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #43 on: September 20, 2019, 07:35:39 AM »
Come on Flash. Itís always better to plan ahead rather than to lighten your pack along the way by throwing out non-essentials on the trail.

Early days when I was hiking heavy, I got lost in BB Ranch and seriously considered dropping my whole miserable, torturous pack on the trail and just walking out with the clothes on my back.


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Offline DeserTrek

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Re: Weighing gear
« Reply #44 on: September 20, 2019, 10:43:24 AM »
That tyvek rain suit is not a good choice You will have to have to remove your backpack and shoes each time it rains AND remove it each time the rain stops. It just doesn't work in real terms.

You would be much better off with a rain kilt. It would be way more realistic and save you time and effort.

https://www.ula-equipment.com/product/rain-kilt/

https://mountainlaureldesigns.com/product/mld-rain-kilt/

That said, the Rail Raider pants that I listed above are a much better choice. I hiked a 30 mile trail last week in Gila NF that had at least 30 water crossings that were knee deep and some waist deep. These pants dried within 30 minutes each time. There is no way these pants would still be wet if you let them dry overnight. Honestly, if they weren't dry within an hour, then I'd have to see it to believe it. They're pretty darn tough too. I can attest as they stood up to LOTS of bushwhacking.

 


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