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Big Bend Conservancy

Over-estimating your experience or under-estimating the terrain in a place like Big Bend can result in serious injury or death. Use the information and advice found here wisely. Climb/Hike/Camp/Drive at your own risk.

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What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?

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Offline Al

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What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?
« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2007, 09:28:22 PM »
Roy, a fair statement, but Dang! Cheer up!  One can still experience the remoteness at a primitive campsite and a short hike into the desert . . . true you won't have find your own water but there is still a lot to experience.  

Al

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Offline Roy

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What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?
« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2007, 10:19:36 PM »
Wasn't meant to sound gloomy; there's plenty of stuff I still can and will do;  you're right;  that's part of what makes the Bend so special.  Maybe someday I'll get to Dominguez Spring, but it would've been a helluva lot easier 30 years ago.  Meantime, am planning a day hike down Alamo Creek (maybe find a T Rex), another walk along Tornillo Creek from the Fossil Bone Exhibit,  and I've been wondering about Gano Spring for some time;  it's close to the road but I've never heard anyone mention it.  Anyone ever been there?

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Offline ReDiscovering

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What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?
« Reply #17 on: January 11, 2007, 11:42:14 PM »
Someone here has the signature line, "Trim your toenails".    That little bit of advise is gonna save my butt out there.  While I was breaking in my new boots, that became appearent.  I'm just glad I didn't have to get to my first big decent and discover a) my boots aren't the right fit and b) I forgot to stop by the "Gorgeous, Pretty Beauty-Nails Salon" for my pedicure.

What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?
« Reply #18 on: January 12, 2007, 07:40:11 AM »
Justg to go out in the middle of nowhere and just be still and listen to the overwhelming silence as you watch the fireworks (sunrises and sunsets).

In a timeless place such as BB, one does not have to keep track of time itself....

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Offline dave2

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What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?
« Reply #19 on: January 12, 2007, 08:46:46 AM »
I wish I had started going to th park when I was in my 20s and able to do all the neat stuff like the Outer Mountain Loop.  Some of the hikes are beyond me now, and I don't plan to push my luck, especially after reading the account of the recent ET rescue.

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Offline kellis1231

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What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?
« Reply #20 on: January 12, 2007, 03:26:55 PM »
I agree with all the prior posts.  I will add one additional thought of a practical nature.  Do not underestimate the amount of water you need.  The humidity level in BB is much lower than what we are used to in the Austin area and you may not notice it at first.  But, if you do not keep yourself hydrated -- and that may mean you force yourself to drink water -- you will have some problems.  Do not wait until you "think" you are thirsty; keep water with you at all times.  And do not attempt some of the longer day hikes without more water than you think you will need.  You will probably use every drop and still need more.

A thought of a spiritual nature would be to pay attention to the earlier post that spoke of just going into the desert and quiet your mind and LISTEN to the overwhelming sound of nothing.  During my first trip to BB, my husband drove me out on one of the dirt roads completely away from everything.  He shut off the truck and aksed me to step outside with him.  We both just sat in the bed of the truck and I was completely overcome with the site of millions of stars and the deafening sound of complete silence.  It was a moment I will never forget.  And it is something I do everytime I am there.......just calm your mind, be in the moment and really feel the special-ness of that place.
" ...tolerance of intolerance is cowardice"

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Offline happyhiker39

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What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?
« Reply #21 on: January 12, 2007, 04:12:36 PM »
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Do not underestimate the amount of water you need
Yes, we will be caching water as well as carrying it.  I'll probably carry 6 liters on me between cache spots...

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Offline happyhiker39

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What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?
« Reply #22 on: January 12, 2007, 04:52:16 PM »
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Another lesson learned: no matter how hot it gets on long hikes, don't forget to eat even if you're not hungry. Lots of minerals, etc. are lost while sweating and need to be replaced. Water alone can actually kill you (see hyponatremia and water intoxication).


Yep, this is something that occurred to me, but it didn't really hit home until after reading "98.6 degrees, The Art of keeping Your Ass Alive".  In looking back at my own hiking history, I tend to skip over snacking on the trails because my appetite decreases significantly. I'll need to be more on top of that. That's a GREAT book btw and I can't recommend it enough. I recently purchased it and read it in one day. I've learned a great deal from it and will read it several times over I'm sure.

There was a very interesting section on using sports drinks, etc... in relation to quick re-hydration. It said that those things can actually slow down the absorption of water in your system because they cause the stomach to hold onto the liquid longer vs. getting into the large intestine fast which is where the water is absorbed by the body.  There's a great deal more to it than that of course, but that is the basic gist.

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Offline Goldilocks

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What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?
« Reply #23 on: January 12, 2007, 06:21:18 PM »
It's easy to keep your eyes on your feet and the trail when you are hiking.  Don't forget to stop and look up! It's worth it.  8)

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Offline RichardM

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What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?
« Reply #24 on: January 12, 2007, 11:01:58 PM »
Quote from: "happyhiker39"
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Another lesson learned: no matter how hot it gets on long hikes, don't forget to eat even if you're not hungry. Lots of minerals, etc. are lost while sweating and need to be replaced. Water alone can actually kill you (see hyponatremia and water intoxication).

Yep, this is something that occurred to me, but it didn't really hit home until after reading "98.6 degrees, The Art of keeping Your Ass Alive".  In looking back at my own hiking history, I tend to skip over snacking on the trails because my appetite decreases significantly. I'll need to be more on top of that. That's a GREAT book btw and I can't recommend it enough. I recently purchased it and read it in one day. I've learned a great deal from it and will read it several times over I'm sure.

There was a very interesting section on using sports drinks, etc... in relation to quick re-hydration. It said that those things can actually slow down the absorption of water in your system because they cause the stomach to hold onto the liquid longer vs. getting into the large intestine fast which is where the water is absorbed by the body.  There's a great deal more to it than that of course, but that is the basic gist.

Good point.  If you're already dehydrated, nothing will work better or faster than plain water.  After you get your fluid level up, then start worrying about electrolytes, etc.  Sports drinks work great on the trail for energy as well as for mineral balance.  I usually keep one bottle full of Gatorade and one with water.  I'll usually take a swig of one and chase it with the other throughout the hike.

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SHANEA

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How About...
« Reply #25 on: January 13, 2007, 02:15:56 PM »
Quote from: "RichardM"
I usually keep one bottle full of Gatorade and one with water.


I like carrying nothing but water, but having some of those single use packs of electrolyte that you can mix with water on the trail.  Really like the "power shot" gummy worm type of energy/electrolyte cubes.

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Offline happyhiker39

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What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?
« Reply #26 on: January 13, 2007, 02:59:09 PM »
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Really like the "power shot" gummy worm type of energy/electrolyte cubes.


Do these type of things have high fructose corn syrup in them? I'm trying to stay away from that stuff.  The powder sounds like a good lighter weight alternative and you don't have to worry about quick re-hydration should you need just plain water. Speaking of powders...

What I've been doing is carrying packs of "EmergenC" Vitamin powder because they have a significant amount of potassium in them.  Once after a 10 mile hike I got severe leg cramping in the middle of the night and learned a lesson about depleting my body of minerals. I usually drink a glass of water with "EmergenC" in it right before a hike and sometimes before I go to bed at night if I went on a particularly long taxing trek. I've never had problems with legs cramping since.

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SHANEA

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Just What the Dr. Ordered....
« Reply #27 on: January 13, 2007, 05:16:52 PM »
Quote from: "happyhiker39"
Really like the "power shot" gummy worm type of energy/electrolyte cubes.


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Do these type of things have high fructose corn syrup in them?


http://www.clifbar.com/eat/shot_drink.cfm?location=shotdrink

These are my favs...
http://www.clifbar.com/eat/shot_blok.cfm?location=shot

This is the cranraz.  
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Ingredients: Organic Brown Rice Syrup, Organic Evaporated Cane Juice, Organic Brown Rice Syrup Solids, Pectin, Citric Acid, Colored With Purple Berry Concentrate, Natural Flavor, Coconut Oil, Carnauba Wax.

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BigBendHiker

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What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?
« Reply #28 on: January 13, 2007, 05:43:03 PM »
Wish I had not waited 25 years to return.  First visit in 1978; second visit in 2003 and been going each year since with my family.  Getting married in between and raisin' kids and racing bikes took priority.  Glad I finally came back!.


BBH

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Offline happyhiker39

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What do you know now, that You wish you knew then?
« Reply #29 on: January 13, 2007, 06:04:22 PM »
Thanks for the information SHANEA...I never knew about this stuff. Looks promising. :)

 


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