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BBRSP rescue

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Offline Quatro

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BBRSP rescue
« on: October 07, 2013, 05:10:14 PM »
A reminder that this can be dangerous country.  Kudos to SAR, which evidently included government employees.  :13:


http://www.statesman.com/news/ap/us/ark-reporter-stable-after-rescue-from-texas-park/nbHNw/
When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro - HST

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Offline trtlrock

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2013, 06:45:33 PM »
Man -- that was a close call.

Gotta say it though -- that's what happens when you make a lot of bad decisions -- some major, some minor.

It is utterly impossible to tell from the text what they were actually doing. How you can go from a scenic overlook one night to being utterly lost and at death's door apparently one night later is an interesting mystery...   :eusa_think:
John & Tess

"...and I'll face each day with a smile, for the time that I've been given's such a little while..." - Arthur Lee

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Offline Quatro

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2013, 06:48:25 PM »
When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro - HST

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Online Flash

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2013, 06:49:10 PM »
Here is the Chronicle version, which has some other parts to the story:
http://www.chron.com/news/article/Couple-has-near-fatal-4-day-hike-after-getting-4875513.php
 
Some of the reported moves they made baffle me, e.g. washing their clothes to get the cactus spines out, then getting hypothermic later on?  :eusa_doh:

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Offline mule ears

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2013, 07:23:49 PM »
Yep, a lot of bad decisions the biggest maybe being not having an adequate map and a clue as to where they were going.  You would think that if they came to the Bend every year they would have taken more caution.
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
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Offline trtlrock

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2013, 07:51:52 PM »
Wow -- that's a stupendous amount of bad decision-making.

I guess I can say that since all apparently ended well.  :icon_smile:

The way it was written up sure makes the NPS look bad, and BBRSP look like it's as dangerous as Mordor.  :icon_lol: I mean -- it reads like they were frog-marched through some gate (still clutching their proverbial pajamas, perhaps?) by mean NPS goons, then left alone in this adjacent desolate wilderness to wander blindly until they died.

In reality, of course, they had to drive by Study Butte, Terlingua, and Lajitas, and then all the way past Sauceda, when they then decided to throw themselves headlong into making as many bad decisions as possible.  :icon_lol:   :icon_rolleyes:
« Last Edit: October 08, 2013, 07:25:41 AM by trtlrock »
John & Tess

"...and I'll face each day with a smile, for the time that I've been given's such a little while..." - Arthur Lee

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Offline Quatro

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2013, 08:02:13 PM »
Well, they've probably been every year to BIBE but not the State park.  They drove from Arkansas not knowing for sure that the park would be shut down.  I doubt detailed topos are available in Study Butte. I don't know the hike they intended to take, but this sorta reminds me of the hiker in Parent's book that died after missing the parking lot at Grapevine Hills ( I think it was). 

Given that they are journalists, I hope they eventually chronicle their journey eventually.  Then again it may just be too personal.
When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro - HST

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Offline dillomaster

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2013, 10:39:35 PM »
Sounds like they were very lucky!

The "official" park "exploration map" is 1:48000 - and is just barely adequate for land navigation if you are familiar with the area and have pretty good skills (and aren't dehydrated and near panic!)  When I was there in the spring that was the only map option for purchase - they did not have topos available.  And if they did you would need a dozen or so to cover the whole park.  Fortunately we are regular visitors so we have all the topos - if you spread them out they cover the whole living room floor - gives you a good sense of the size of the place.

Glad they are ok.  Hope to hear their story some day. Should be interesting!

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Offline presidio

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #8 on: October 07, 2013, 11:08:52 PM »
Well, they've probably been every year to BIBE but not the State park.  I doubt detailed topos are available in Study Butte. I don't know the hike they intended to take, but this sorta reminds me of the hiker in Parent's book that died after missing the parking lot at Grapevine Hills ( I think it was).

These kinds of situations have little to do with not being familiar with some area, or how many times they've been somewhere, but a fundamental lack of outdoor knowledge and preparedness (regardless of how "experienced" they may claim to be).

These folks appear to be the classic park visitors. They are used to the handholding of state and federal park rangers, signed trails and intersections, etc. They also are good poster children for my theme that parks have seriously dumbed down the outdoor skills of folks who then simply don't know any better.

This is not unlike the guy a couple of years or so ago that got himself lost and trapped (by lack of experience and preparation) in a canyon leading to the river because he could see, hear and smell the river but had no common sense to understand it was highly unlikely he could successfully stroll down to it. Eventually, he slid down a dryfall and could neither go down or up. He was extremely lucky to be found in time. His skill level was described as an experienced "trekker" whatever that was supposed to mean (and I commented on that elsewhere on the board at the time).

In the current case, there is the comment their map was "too small". Anybody ever hiked in Big Bend back in the day when a 1:130,000 scale map was the only resource? It was entirely possible to do it, in lots of places, including the Outer Mountain Loop/Dodson Trail. That was a very small scale map...over 10,800' to the inch (there was no detail, only broad themes), in contrast to the 2000' to the inch on the 24k maps of today.

More likely, they really don't know how to navigate by map and compass. Why? Because in most national parks you don't have to on most of the trails the majority of tourists throng. In most state parks, the areas are too small to really need a map or get lost.

It also begs the question of simple orientation. It's a desert, you can see for miles, or you can walk up to places where you can see for miles. Landmarks abound. Folks that don't take the time to SEE where they are and keep a general awareness of how they got there, leaves me completely baffled. Again, a complete lack of experience in an environment they probably never before perceived as a serious threat to their well being, because they never had to until it was too late.

They also had little water at the outset, despite the apparent "experience" of visiting Big Bend every year since 2001. Obviously, they learned nothing.

Also, even though they apparently were carrying little but fanny packs, both somehow failed to notice she left hers behind at a rest stop. Now, that likely was a result of the onset of dehydration, a predictable result of not being responsible enough to properly plan for the hike. The report that she had discarded her clothing certainly is proof of severe mental befuddlement due to dehydration.

They both were extremely lucky (she was extraordinarily fortunate) and it wasn't even anywhere near the brutal summer conditions.

I especially enjoyed this comment from a friend: "Frye was a seasoned reporter who had covered major disasters, including the 2010 flooding at an Arkansas campground that killed 20 people. She's a preparer,"

Yep, all that makes you ready for what almost killed her. All her "coverage" occurred with a vehicle nearby, comfy motels and support (not unlike park situations). She may have been at disasters on the job, but never was IN one until BBRSP.
_____________
<  presidio  >
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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline badknees

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2013, 03:38:17 PM »
Well, they've probably been every year to BIBE but not the State park.  I doubt detailed topos are available in Study Butte. I don't know the hike they intended to take, but this sorta reminds me of the hiker in Parent's book that died after missing the parking lot at Grapevine Hills ( I think it was).

These kinds of situations have little to do with not being familiar with some area, or how many times they've been somewhere, but a fundamental lack of outdoor knowledge and preparedness (regardless of how "experienced" they may claim to be).

These folks appear to be the classic park visitors. They are used to the handholding of state and federal park rangers, signed trails and intersections, etc. They also are good poster children for my theme that parks have seriously dumbed down the outdoor skills of folks who then simply don't know any better.

This is not unlike the guy a couple of years or so ago that got himself lost and trapped (by lack of experience and preparation) in a canyon leading to the river because he could see, hear and smell the river but had no common sense to understand it was highly unlikely he could successfully stroll down to it. Eventually, he slid down a dryfall and could neither go down or up. He was extremely lucky to be found in time. His skill level was described as an experienced "trekker" whatever that was supposed to mean (and I commented on that elsewhere on the board at the time).

In the current case, there is the comment their map was "too small". Anybody ever hiked in Big Bend back in the day when a 1:130,000 scale map was the only resource? It was entirely possible to do it, in lots of places, including the Outer Mountain Loop/Dodson Trail. That was a very small scale map...over 10,800' to the inch (there was no detail, only broad themes), in contrast to the 2000' to the inch on the 24k maps of today.

More likely, they really don't know how to navigate by map and compass. Why? Because in most national parks you don't have to on most of the trails the majority of tourists throng. In most state parks, the areas are too small to really need a map or get lost.

It also begs the question of simple orientation. It's a desert, you can see for miles, or you can walk up to places where you can see for miles. Landmarks abound. Folks that don't take the time to SEE where they are and keep a general awareness of how they got there, leaves me completely baffled. Again, a complete lack of experience in an environment they probably never before perceived as a serious threat to their well being, because they never had to until it was too late.

They also had little water at the outset, despite the apparent "experience" of visiting Big Bend every year since 2001. Obviously, they learned nothing.

Also, even though they apparently were carrying little but fanny packs, both somehow failed to notice she left hers behind at a rest stop. Now, that likely was a result of the onset of dehydration, a predictable result of not being responsible enough to properly plan for the hike. The report that she had discarded her clothing certainly is proof of severe mental befuddlement due to dehydration.

They both were extremely lucky (she was extraordinarily fortunate) and it wasn't even anywhere near the brutal summer conditions.

I especially enjoyed this comment from a friend: "Frye was a seasoned reporter who had covered major disasters, including the 2010 flooding at an Arkansas campground that killed 20 people. She's a preparer,"

Yep, all that makes you ready for what almost killed her. All her "coverage" occurred with a vehicle nearby, comfy motels and support (not unlike park situations). She may have been at disasters on the job, but never was IN one until BBRSP.

Good analysis!
Not all those who wander are lost.
J.R.R. Tolkien

Through the Mirror
http://mirrormagic.com

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Offline Beatrice

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2013, 05:01:44 PM »
The part that gets me the most is that the husband couldn't tell the rangers where he left his wife once he got to the truck and drove to them. That led to 2 days of searching by land and air.

Are you kidding me? She's out there in the massive park somewhere and they have to guess where?

Once he found his way again and located the truck, why didn't he go back to his now-dehydration-deranged wife and drag the woman with him? I suspect he would have lost his way again, losing both her and the car, and so he decided his best help was to go to the vehicle he could see and new would lead to someone with at least a passing ability in orienteering.

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Online Flash

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #11 on: October 09, 2013, 08:01:25 PM »
Didn't one of the accounts mention bicycles somewhere in the mix?  :eusa_doh:
 
Here is probably the best account I have read thus far from Big Bend Now:)

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Offline trtlrock

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #12 on: October 09, 2013, 08:08:06 PM »
Thanks Flash -- that's a much more coherent report.

She is definitely lucky to be alive.

They made their share of mistakes to be sure, but it no longer reads like a candidate for the Darwin Awards.
John & Tess

"...and I'll face each day with a smile, for the time that I've been given's such a little while..." - Arthur Lee

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Online Flash

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #13 on: October 09, 2013, 08:38:10 PM »
OK I got even more curious about how this all played out in their hometown. Here is the long version complete with a map and the behind the scenes political angle from Arkansas:
http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2013/oct/08/2-recount-ordeal-texas-barrens-20131008/?f=news-Arkansas
 :icon_cool:
 
PS - Not many reader comments in these articles, except for the Houston Chronicle one where there are some good ones, including one that read like something our Reece might have written, wise and insightful.  ;)

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Offline badknees

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Re: BBRSP rescue
« Reply #14 on: October 09, 2013, 08:50:33 PM »
Quote
Every year the couple goes back to celebrate. They know the trails in the basin like they were printed on road maps under their skin.

Yeah, that Window View Trail is a real backcountry experience......
Not all those who wander are lost.
J.R.R. Tolkien

Through the Mirror
http://mirrormagic.com

 


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