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March 2014 trip

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Offline Undertaker

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #30 on: April 08, 2014, 12:09:27 PM »
Great photos pumping me up for July trip.
Visiting BB since 1966, nothing like being lost and finding heaven.

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Offline guc126

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #31 on: April 08, 2014, 10:45:36 PM »
Thanks for the pics but all that fisheye gave a case of exotropia.   :eusa_shifty:

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Offline MikeW

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #32 on: April 09, 2014, 07:45:25 AM »
Glad y'all liked 'em! And the fisheye comment cracked me up! Usually I'd have edited harder and shown fewer of those but it was *such* a gorgeous morning.

I was shooting a u4/3's camera this trip; Olympus EM-1 and loving it. The lens was a little, inexpensive, manual-focus 7.5mm (15mm FF eq) jobbie and it was just a hoot. Set the f/stop to about f5.6 and *everything* was gonna be in focus. It was just so much fun to try holding the camera in different places and different ways and seeing what came out.

Anyway... hope your vision returns to normal soon!  :icon_eek:

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Offline tjavery

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #33 on: April 09, 2014, 09:05:57 PM »
I was shooting a u4/3's camera this trip; Olympus EM-1 and loving it.

Cool! :icon_biggrin:

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Offline Reece

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #34 on: April 10, 2014, 09:27:41 AM »
Please pardon me for just a minute. I'm not quite sure about all this fancy photography. I like looking at it but it's obviously enhanced, bordering on the surreal. I know that "plain" pictures don't do the "in-person" experience justice and there's really no way to capture the actual experience with any media. We struggle with still shots, videos, and written descriptions, trying to preserve and communicate the "times of our lives." That's all fine and good but in my opinion, an over-enhanced photo is similar an over-written trip report. It just feels like somebody is trying too hard.

If we set the standard for "good" photo journalism at electronically enhanced photography, we're drawing a pretty tight circle and eliminating a lot of outdoor-loving folks with limited budgets - good storytellers who might be loath to post a more humble report.

That's all. I'm open for correction.

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Offline MikeW

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #35 on: April 10, 2014, 10:50:03 AM »
Reece.... hm.

The *last* thing I'd want to do w/ posting any of my photography is discourage anyone from posting anything. It never occurred to me that might happen. It's just my hobby. I put it out there; people either like it or they don't. I continually amazed at which shots resonate with which people. Sometimes ones I barely like well enough to post gather lots of positive comments. I can also think of one shot in particular that's high on my personal list of all-time favorites and pretty much no one else that's seen it cares for it much.

My camping and shooting buddy on this trip absolutely hates the fisheye, over-the-top look of several of these and told me so. At the same time he's over the moon about some shots I took of him, as well as some of the other stuff, and was equally clear about that. It's all good - either way I'm gonna shoot and process what suits me on any given day. Now, I absolutely like getting critiques that are negative as well as positive. Both are food for thought.

For me, I enjoy looking at all photography and reading all of the trip reports. I see shots on here and writing on here that *I* judge to be better than most of my shots and all of my writing. It won't stop me from contributing what I can. I personally would hope others feel the same. Not sure it's up to me, you, or anyone else to moderate our contributions due to what effect they might or might not have on others. That's not meant to be harsh, just not sure how else to proceed.

It'll be interesting to see what consensus there is, tho! And, may I add, thanks for posing a thought-provoking question.

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Offline RichardM

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #36 on: April 10, 2014, 11:29:27 AM »
HDR photography is a very polarizing topic (pardon the pun). I consider it leaning more towards art than just "capturing what the eye sees". Doesn't mean I don't like it, but I tend to judge it differently for whatever reason. As far as "standards" for what types of photos should be allowed, ain't gonna go there...  :eusa_snooty:

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Offline steelfrog

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #37 on: April 10, 2014, 12:06:09 PM »
I appreciate looking at them; I can't do it--well, I could I suppose, I just don't have time.

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Offline Reece

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #38 on: April 10, 2014, 12:39:21 PM »
I'm not trying to be a purist on this stuff or to suggest we have any stupid rules. I probably shouldn't have said anything at all. It's really very beautiful. Maybe if I just characterize it as art... I guess I'm mostly trying to understand why I don't care for it, personally. Probably some character flaw in me. Sometimes it helps to talk things out.

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Offline MikeW

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #39 on: April 10, 2014, 01:27:17 PM »
Hey, Reese, it's all good. :eusa_dance: *LOTS* of people don't like HDR-looking shots. Like I said - my best shooting buddy finds some of these kinda nauseating. Sometimes I strive for realism (whatever that is) and sometimes not. Generally I'll try to make an image that reminds me of how I felt when looking at the scene. But sometimes not. Whether photography is art or not is a debate that's as old as photography. I personally just stay out of that debate.

Mostly, though, one thing that isn't debatable to me is that in NO WAY would I want anyone to be discouraged from contributing their own words or images to this this board. It's a wonderful resource and that would make it poorer.

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Offline RichardM

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #40 on: April 10, 2014, 01:38:22 PM »
Mostly, though, one thing that isn't debatable to me is that in NO WAY would I want anyone to be discouraged from contributing their own words or images to this this board. It's a wonderful resource and that would make it poorer.
Absolutely. Remember, it's not a competition.

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Offline Reece

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #41 on: April 10, 2014, 02:15:48 PM »
Not a competition...
Except when it comes to the calendar, eh?

Maybe its because the more surreal photos make the Big Bend look like a "fairyland" where everything is beautiful and I know it first hand as a rough, inhospitable, and dangerous no-mans land.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2014, 02:33:39 PM by Reece »

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Offline RichardM

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #42 on: April 10, 2014, 02:39:33 PM »
Not a competition...
Except when it comes to the calendar, eh?
:eusa_doh:

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Offline tjavery

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #43 on: April 10, 2014, 04:32:48 PM »
Photography can be a tricky thing when it comes to what it represents.

To a lot of people, a photograph should be an accurate representation of the real scene, i.e. the scene as it was observed by human eyes. People sometimes expect that when viewing photos.

Terms like HDR and Photoshop have taken on an almost universal negative connotation these days. They have come to represent UNtruth and lies. There seems to be frequent news articles on how an important photo was Photoshopped, or just 'Shopped, and how that was evil and bad.

The absolute truth is that the simple act of taking a photo, regardless of medium used or equipment, alters what was seen by the human eyes at that moment and time. As soon as you snap a photo, it's been "'Shopped".

There isn't a camera system that exists today, or has ever existed, that captures a scene EXACTLY as our eyes see it. And even if there were, it would still alter the real, natural scene because it would capture only a portion of the real, natural scene and take it out of context.

(and I'm ignoring the variations possible in the presentation of a photo, e.g. viewing on different computer monitors, looking at a print under different lights, etc.)

So, photographers make their photos, and viewers look at them and receive visual information. Sometimes folks will see something that looks to them natural and realistic, and sometimes not. At the end of the day, it's relative, and it is most definitely an ART (or rather, the opposite of an exact science).

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Photographing the landscape has many challenges. Probably the biggest challenge is photographing scenes that have a wide dynamic range, i.e. a great range between the darkest darks and the lightest lights.

Typical camera systems (digital or film) cannot capture a wide range like our human eyes do. Digital cameras have gotten very good over the years, but they still cannot match our eyes.

So, when you photograph a very bright-to-dark scene, you cannot capture it all in one go. You can expose quickly and capture the sky with good detail while the ground goes black, or you can over expose and let the sky go white with no or little detail while the ground is bright and visible with good detail.

The old-school way of dealing with that scenario is to use special filters. This practice seems to be fading away in favor of the multiple-exposure/post-processing method.

So, you capture the same scene with different exposures. And between all the exposures captured (2 or more), there's enough info for you to put it together later into one, final photo.

It's this putting together that can be difficult.

There are many HDR programs out there (and for the uninitiated, HDR = High Dynamic Range), such as Photomatix. The problem with these programs, and I've tried a few, is that it's very easy to produce something that looks unnatural. There's too much detail in the shadows, for example.

There are means of tweaking the settings and making fine adjustments to change the look of the output. It's not an exact science.

Some photographers are happy with over-cooked versions where the entire photo is screaming with detail. Others are content to let dark areas of the photo go to pure black and have no detail. It comes down to personal preference.

I'm hard-headed (and an Aggie) so I go the long route. I've tried the HDR packages, and I don't like them. I capture multiple exposures and then manually blend them (using Photoshop!) to get a final "HDR" photo. (this process kind of simulates, digitally, what you'd do in the old-school method of using graduated neutral density filters)

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The thing to ask is whether or not you like the work? If you do, then great! If you don't then also great! Move along, go look at something else. Each photographer has their own style and way of doing things. Every photo is different. That's what I like about photography.

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Offline guc126

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Re: March 2014 trip
« Reply #44 on: April 11, 2014, 01:51:40 AM »
Just  a thought about readers being discouraged to post.

BBC reminds me of a good old neighborhood pub. Many different types in there but pretty much all decent folk. If you're too intimidated to walk in, down a couple of cold ones and spin a yarn or two with whoever's listening, no matter how humble or eloquent God made you, then you probably don't belong.

Tell you one thing. No amount of "cooking" "shopping" or "realism" can save an image that is missing the most essential element of composition. What makes some of the images on this post, and so many other posts, so pleasing to my eye is that they are very well composed.

 


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