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'Skeeter repeller??

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Offline Roy

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'Skeeter repeller??
« on: June 22, 2008, 09:23:44 PM »
Anybody familiar with this thing?  Does it work?

http://www.mosquitorepellent.com/

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Offline badknees

  • Actually, I was there once
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Re: 'Skeeter repeller??
« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2008, 09:53:00 PM »
Probably works, but like a fogger, if there is any wind it's probably not very effective
Not all those who wander are lost.
– J.R.R. Tolkien

Through the Mirror
http://mirrormagic.com

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Offline The Scorpion

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Re: 'Skeeter repeller??
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2008, 10:20:01 PM »
here is a review of it.

http://hunting.about.com/od/hunting/gr/aapr_thermacell.htm

personally I would stick with bug spray, some of the sprays are getting a little better

James
everything is better with bacon!!!

http://jamesb.smugmug.com/BigBendNationalPark/

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Online Al

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Re: 'Skeeter repeller??
« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2008, 11:54:14 PM »
I have been using the Off Mosquito Lantern for several summers. It's similar in concept; a heat source vaporizes repellent off of a fibrous pad. 

http://www.offprotects.com/mosquito-repeller/

A friend who camped one summer in Alaska turned me on to them.  They would use three of them spaced equal distance around the campfire, but that's Alaska. We'll light one on the patio. They're not cheap, $5 or $6 dollars for three candles and pads which is good for 6 evenings, if used a couple of hours an evening. It works very well and you don't have to gunk up with repellent.  It can really make the ol' patio a more enjoyable place to hang out and inviting to guests. 

Al
« Last Edit: June 23, 2008, 12:14:48 AM by Al »

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SHANEA

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Re: 'Skeeter repeller??
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2008, 09:50:18 AM »
Quote
Title:
    Laboratory testing of a lethal ovitrap for Aedes aegypti.
Authors:
    Zeichner, B. C.1
    Perich, M. J.2
Source:
    Medical & Veterinary Entomology; Sep99, Vol. 13 Issue 3, p234-238, 5p, 2 charts
Document Type:
    Article
Subject Terms:
    *AEDES aegypti
    *MOSQUITOES -- Control
    *EQUIPMENT & supplies
    *DENGUE
Author-Supplied Keywords:
    Aedes aegypti
    dengue vector
    mosquito control
    ovitrap
    pyrethroids
Abstract:
    SummaryLaboratory tests were conducted to determine the feasibility of making the mosquito ovitrap lethal to Aedes aegypti (L.) when they attempt to oviposit in the trap. Heavy-weight velour paper strips (2.54 ? 11 cm) were used as an alternative to the wooden paddle normally provided as a substrate for mosquito oviposition. The paper strips were pretreated with insecticide solutions and allowed to dry before being used in oviposition cups of 473 ml capacity, filled with water initially to within 2.5 cm of the brim. Insecticides chosen for their quick knock-down efficacy were bendiocarb 76% WP (1.06 mg a.i./strip) and four pyrethroids: permethrin 25% WP (0.16 mg a.i./strip), deltamethin 4.75% SC (0.87 mg a.i./strip), cypermethrin 40% WP (2.81 mg a.i./strip), and cyfluthrin 20% WP (0.57 mg a.i./strip). For experimental evaluation, two oviposition cups (one with an insecticide-treated strip and one with an untreated strip) were placed in cages (cubic 30 cm) with gravid female Ae. aegypti mosquitoes (aged 6–8 days) from a susceptible laboratory strain. Mortality-rates of female mosquitoes were 45% for bendiocarb, 47% for permethrin, 98% for deltamethrin, 100% for cypermethrin, and 100% for cyfluthrin. Young instar larvae added to the treated cups died within 2 h. After water evaporation from the cups for 38 days, fresh mosquito females had access to previously submerged portions of the velour paper paddle, and mortality rates of 59% or more occurred. Cups that had water (360 ml) dripped into them, to simulate rain, produced female mosquito mortality rates of > 50% and all larvae died within 3 h of being added. These tests demonstrate that the ovitrap can be made lethal to both adults and larvae by insecticidal treatment of the ovistrip. Field efficacy trials are underway in Brazil to access the impact of this simple, low-cost, environmentally benign approach on populations of the dengue vector Ae. aegypti. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    1US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, U.S.A. and
    2Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, U.S.A.
ISSN:
    0269283X[/url]

Quote
Title:
    Field evaluation of a lethal ovitrap against dengue vectors in Brazil.
Authors:
    Perich, M. J1
    Kardec, A2
    Braga, I. A3
    Portal, I. F4
    Burge, R1
    Zeichner, B. C5
    Brogdon, W. A6
    Wirtz, R. A6
Source:
    Medical & Veterinary Entomology; Jun2003, Vol. 17 Issue 2, p205-210, 6p
Document Type:
    Article
Subject Terms:
    *AEDES
    *INSECTICIDES
Geographic Terms:
    BRAZIL
Author-Supplied Keywords:
    Aedes aegypti
    Aedes albopictus
    Brazil
    container breeding
    dengue vectors
    lethal ovitrap
    mosquito control
    pupa survey
    Rio de Janeiro
Abstract:
    Abstract. Field evaluation of a ‘lethal ovitrap’ (LO) to control dengue vector Aedes mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae), was undertaken in two Brazilian municipalities, Areia Branca and Nilopolis, in the State of Rio de Janeiro. The LO is designed to kill Aedes via an insecticide-treated ovistrip (impregnated with deltamethrin). In each municipality, the intervention was applied to a group of 30 houses (10 LOs/house) and compared to 30 houses without LOs in the same neighbourhood. Five LOs were put outside and five LOs inside each treated house. Three methods of monitoring Aedes density were employed: (i) percentage of containers positive for larvae and/or pupae; (ii) total pupae/house; (iii) total adult females/house collected by aspirator indoors. Weekly mosquito surveys began during the month before LO placement, by sampling from different groups of 10 houses/week for 3 weeks pre-intervention (i.e. 30 houses/month) and for 3 months post-intervention in both treated and untreated areas. Prior to LO placement at the end of February 2001, Aedes aegypti (L) densities were similar among houses scheduled for LO treatment and comparison (untreated control) at each municipality. Very few Ae. albopictus (Skuse) were found and this species was excluded from the assessment. Post-intervention densities of Ae. aegypti were significantly reduced for most comparators (P < 0.01), as shown by fewer positive containers (4–5 vs. 10–18) and pupae/house (0.3–0.7 vs. 8–10) at LO-treated vs. untreated houses, 3 months post-treatment at both municipalities. Numbers of adult Ae. aegypti females indoors were consistently reduced in LO-treated houses at Areia Branca (3.6 vs. 6.8/house 3 months post-intervention) but not at Niloplis (∼3/house, attributed to immigration). These results demonstrate sustained impact of LOs on dengue vector population densities in housing conditions of Brazilian municipalities. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Author Affiliations:
    1Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S.A.,
    2Fundacao Nacional de Saude, Rio de Janerio, Brazil,
    3Fundacao Nacional de Saude, Brazilia, Brazil,
    4U.S. Army Medical Research Unit, Rio de Janerio, Brazil;
    5U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, U.S.A. and
    6Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.
ISSN:
    0269283X

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Online Al

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Re: 'Skeeter repeller??
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2008, 10:08:40 PM »
To the side, my friend who turned me on to the Off Lanterns was Director of Health and Safety for a major Texas University and hospital for over 20 years, now retired.  We're talking an insect repellent and NOT an insecticide.  I remember when we were in college, the grocery store by campus hung a pest strip in the pastry case to kill flies.  He jumped them up on side and down the other.  They pulled the pest strip before he left and never used it again.

Al

 


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