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About a tent...

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Lemming_of_the_BDA

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About a tent...
« on: February 09, 2006, 10:34:01 AM »
What kind of tent do you carry in/under your backpack??  

I want a two-man tent that really will sleep two.
It has to be truly rain-proof.

I'm willing to sacrifice a little on the weight issue if it will keep me dry.
My wife, bless her pea-pickin' Big Bend hatin' heart, will let me spend up to $200.00.

Any suggestions??????

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Offline randell

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About a tent...
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2006, 10:57:01 AM »
We have an REI Trail Dome tent for years and it survived some major downpours with no problems.  It was always a little short for us, though (my wife is 6'4" and I am 6'2"), but it lasted us through over 60 nights and is now our backup tent.  They have a newer version by a different name now, but I'm sure it is just as good.

We upgraded to the REI Taj 3 after we had our first kid.  We only used it for 12 camping trips so far, but we did have a downpour at Enchanted Rock once and it did perfectly.  It was really sad watching all of the people with academy tents run through the water you see in the photo dragging their soaked tents behind them.


The Taj 3 had plenty of room for us and our toddler and I have been very pleased with it.  It runs $229, though.  A little over your budget.  

With our latest baby, we upgraded to a "family" tent to use during car camping trips.  This thing, a Marmot Halo 6, is huge (100 sq ft inside).  Hasn't seen rain yet, but I'm anxious to see how it does.  (yes, it does have a rain fly, it just isn't on in the photo)  



My experience with REI tents has been that they are very durable and affordable. :)  :)
There's nothing like a good quest to get you intimate with a place. - Tom Clynes

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SHANEA

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BPM
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2006, 12:51:44 PM »
Backpacker magazine has it's annual gear guide out on news stands - seemingly unbiased reports on everything camping, climbing, and backpacking related.     8)

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SHANEA

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LP
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2006, 12:53:10 PM »
Last picture looks like it was taken somewhere in East Texas?  Not sure about the other one...

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Lemming_of_the_BDA

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About a tent...
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2006, 01:07:01 PM »
Quote from: "Randell"
 It was really sad watching all of the people with academy tents run through the water you see in the photo dragging their soaked tents behind them.



Man, that made me laugh. I was probably one of those PDB's.

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Offline Don H

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About a tent...
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2006, 01:34:38 PM »
I've got a couple, depending on the weather, if it's cold I pack my NorthFace SR-2 (I've had it for 25 years - they don't make it any more but it definitely keeps the rain out, it's kinda lacking on ventilation though so it's pretty warm during the summer).  My other is a North Face Rock - it's great for warm/hot weather, has lots of ventilation and with the rainfly attached correctly it's keeps the rain out very good.  Check out Campmor.com, they usually have pretty good deals on some excellent backpacking tents.
"Rugged isolation in a Jeep with the top down, doors off, sweaty, dusty, listening to your flavor of tunes, immersed in the most beautiful and beguiling desert mountains in all of the Southwest, the Sierra Quemada. Nothing short of spiritual cleansing. " D. Locke

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Offline Robert

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About a tent...
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2006, 01:41:21 PM »
I'm a huge Sierra Designs fan. I have 2 backpacking and 2 car camping tents made by them. But I also have 2 other backpacking tents from other manufacturers. My first backpacking tent was the Clip Flashlight 3. I got the three person version because it had extra floor space, the Clip 2 was really a tight squeeze. It is light weight but not freestanding.

I would recommend looking at the Backpacker Gear Guide, visit the REI website, look at the features, especially weight, floor area, number of poles, freestanding vs. non, number of doors, etc. Get an idea of the features you really want.

Then visit an REI store (Dallas and Plano) and they'll let you set up any of the tents that they have in stock. Set it up and then crawl inside. You really can't go wrong with any of the tents that they carry.

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Offline randell

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Re: LP
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2006, 01:56:16 PM »
Quote from: "SHANEA"
Last picture looks like it was taken somewhere in East Texas?  Not sure about the other one...


The first picture is from Enchanted Rock (which is mentioned in the post  :) ).  The second is from Lake Houston SP last November.  I was going to go to the Big Thicket, but it was flattened by Rita.

It's a blast to go into REI and put up a tent and lie down in it.  It's like setting up camp in a store.  I get the backpacker gear guide and love it, but they only review some tents.  I bet anything you bought at REI would be an excellent tent.  If not, they have that lifetime warranty so if it leaks on you, just exchange it for another.  

Whatever you get, be sure to get the footprint for it.  They protect your tent from rocks, water, etc.  They will probably run about $30 for an under $200 tent.
There's nothing like a good quest to get you intimate with a place. - Tom Clynes

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Offline Don H

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About a tent...
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2006, 02:20:57 PM »
I agree with Randell - get the footprint!  It definitely protects the bottom of your tent from sharp objects and helps keep it clean.
"Rugged isolation in a Jeep with the top down, doors off, sweaty, dusty, listening to your flavor of tunes, immersed in the most beautiful and beguiling desert mountains in all of the Southwest, the Sierra Quemada. Nothing short of spiritual cleansing. " D. Locke

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Offline 10ftTall&BulletPrf

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About a tent...
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2006, 02:49:13 PM »
I've never understood paying for a footprint. I've always used an old shower curtain because its waterproof and pretty doggone durable. Not to mention the right price...free.
"You may all go to work and I will go to Big Bend" - If Davy Crockett were alive today.

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Offline RichardM

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footprints
« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2006, 02:54:53 PM »
Assuming you don't have any old shower curtains to use, Campmor.com sells some polyethylene ground covers in various rectangular sizes.  Much cheaper than the official footprints sold specifically for the individual tents.  You could probably find similar stuff in local stores, including hardware stores, etc.

Note:  If your tent is pitched on an incline on rocky ground (say, like site #49 in the Basin campground) and your tent-mate is sleeping on an old army cot and has to get up numerous times throughout the night to go to the bathroom, the polyethylene ground cloth may or may not prevent the legs of said cot from rubbing a hole in the floor of your tent.   #-o

My tent (which has only been used a couple of times and not yet in the rain) is a Eureka Alpine Meadows 4.  The Timberline 4XT would probably have been a better bet for inclement weather had I stayed with Eureka tents in the same price range.  Campmor has them for $170.  For something better suited for backpacking check out the Eureka Pinnacle Pass 3 XTA
« Last Edit: March 08, 2011, 05:22:37 PM by RichardM »

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Offline randell

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About a tent...
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2006, 03:30:04 PM »
It's a matter or preference with footprints.  Here's why I prefer them:

1. They are custom fit to the tent and attach to the poles.

2. They are very lightweight.

3. They fold up very small (not that I'm an ultralighter, but my wife tries to take everything in the house so I get smaller/lighter stuff so it is easier for me to lug around).  I can fit my footprints in the bag with the tent.

However, if you aren't concerned about weight or size and don't mind trying to get it to fit just right under your tent, a shower curtain or tarp will work just as well and save you a few bucks.

I'm a gear nerd, though, so I like to accessorize! :wink:
There's nothing like a good quest to get you intimate with a place. - Tom Clynes

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Lemming_of_the_BDA

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Re: footprints
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2006, 03:35:52 PM »
Quote from: "RichardM"


Note:  If your tent is pitched on an incline on rocky ground (say, like site #49 in the Basin campground) and your tent-mate is sleeping on an old army cot and has to get up numerous times throughout the night to go to the bathroom, the polyethylene ground cloth may or may not prevent the legs of said cot from rubbing a hole in the floor of your tent.


Are we speaking hypothetically?  :lol:


Most of my trips to BIBE have involved pitching a tent at Pine Canyon 3 and using that as an FOB. My son and I are going to meet in August and spend 3 or 4 days in the mountains. We're gonna check out the Perseids and Cattail Canyon and who knows what else. First time I'll be back-packing overnight, so I'm sure I'll have a ton more questions. Thanks for some excellent advice, y'all.

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Offline Don H

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About a tent...
« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2006, 03:36:22 PM »
I'm a gear nerd too 8)   As Randell said once again, I too like the footprint because it's custom sized and made with grommets or straps that attach directly to the poles keeping right where you want it.
"Rugged isolation in a Jeep with the top down, doors off, sweaty, dusty, listening to your flavor of tunes, immersed in the most beautiful and beguiling desert mountains in all of the Southwest, the Sierra Quemada. Nothing short of spiritual cleansing. " D. Locke

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Lemming_of_the_BDA

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Footprints redux
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2006, 03:39:55 PM »
I had never used one with my tent as I was told, or read somewhere, that a footprint just channeled water under your tent. Evidently this is not the case. More good, practical advice. Thanks!!

 


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