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Over-estimating your experience or under-estimating the terrain in a place like Big Bend can result in serious injury or death. Use the information and advice found here wisely. Climb/Hike/Camp/Drive at your own risk.

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Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters

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Offline Boojum1

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Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #15 on: February 16, 2007, 10:45:34 PM »
Excellent boot advice.  Well done yall.
Get yourself to an REI or well stocked outdoor/hiking store and try on many different brands.  They're heavy in the store if you're used to lightweight hikers.  One thing not mentioned yet is the shank.  I like a steel 3/4 (I think that's what it is...my boots are 8 years old but a lot of that is closet time) and a very stiff sole for rock and heavy pack. (Merrells, ugly grey and about $160 at the time) Everything else I tried was painful and miserable, but better sore calf and thigh muscles than sore feet.  I prefer wool socks year round.

Enjoy the process.
Pithy quote free for years

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Offline Al

  • Dog Face Moth
  • Mountain Lion
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  • 4088
Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2007, 11:22:40 PM »
Took this shot in early Jan 2007 on the trail and sitting on my ass in BiBe.  

I love my gaiters and boots.



Al

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Offline homerboy2u

  • The Chipewa Cris tribe,Canada:
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Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #17 on: February 17, 2007, 08:21:16 AM »
Al....you look as though, you are kilt-hiking in Scotland, not in BIBE...where are your pants :?:  :shock:  :!:
Stay thirsty, my friends.

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Offline Al

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Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #18 on: February 17, 2007, 09:23:04 AM »
Pants?  I don't need no stink'en pants!  

All I need is my boots and gaiters.  That's all I need.

Al

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Offline Undertaker

  • Ham Radio: KD5YA 1999 Ford F-350 4X4 Diesel 150 Galllons Home: Richmond, Texas
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Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #19 on: February 17, 2007, 10:03:52 AM »
Amen, total commando :shock:
Visiting BB since 1966, nothing like being lost and finding heaven.

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Offline Al

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Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #20 on: February 17, 2007, 07:50:04 PM »
Image is every thing!

Must say that was the first time I had to worry about mud while hiking in BiBe.  It was wet, which is a good thing but out of the norm.  Did it require long pants?  NO!  Do I carry long pants in my day pack?  Of course.  Do I wear them? Only when necessary . . .

Al

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Offline homerboy2u

  • The Chipewa Cris tribe,Canada:
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Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #21 on: February 17, 2007, 08:56:23 PM »
Hell yeah, Brother :!:  :!: .... :lol:  :D  :lol:  :D
Stay thirsty, my friends.

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Offline Al

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Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #22 on: February 17, 2007, 09:23:30 PM »
I am but a broken record.  For must of us it's a long drive to BiBe.  

You then go to all the good time and trouble to hike even further into the desert.  After all that trouble does one want to be uncomfortable, or, dare I say, miserable?  I don't think so!  

Bring lots of stuff.  Use the stuff you need and ENJOY!  Do not bemoan the stuff you hauled out there and did not use.  There's always next time.

What will you need?  Better safe than sorry . . .  Figure you might be cut off from civilization or that in fact you will be cut off from general commerce, as most of us know it:  you will have to pay a premium for any stuff you forgot to bring, if you can get it.

Al

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Offline PyramidBlaster

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Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #23 on: February 18, 2007, 10:23:54 AM »
I guess you'd call me the anti-lightweight backpacker...I live my life by the credo, "Better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it..."

Still, I've had to keep my expeditions as compact as possible--with all the camera equipment and such, coming from Florida....the truck gets mighty stuffed.....
"The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents."-H.P. Lovecraft

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Offline Undertaker

  • Ham Radio: KD5YA 1999 Ford F-350 4X4 Diesel 150 Galllons Home: Richmond, Texas
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Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #24 on: February 18, 2007, 12:02:46 PM »
You can't eat, drink, put on, take off what you don't have. In my younger days when I carried heavy loads it was not a problem, with old knees and hips I tend toward lighter, but still carry extra gear, and cull on location in BB. Still pack a little heavy but like my confort in the field. 8)
Visiting BB since 1966, nothing like being lost and finding heaven.

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Offline Mark D

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Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #25 on: February 18, 2007, 02:24:56 PM »
I'm also "middle aged" and have tricky knees. I'm into going as lightweight as possible. In fact on my next overnight backpack I'm thinking of carrying only water and a sleeping bag. (Just like Clint Eastwood in those old cowboy movies. :wink: ) But I'm sure I'll come to my senses by then.

The best analogy I heard about hiking shoes is: wearing heavy leather boots is like driving a bulldozer. Wearing lightweight low-cut hiking shoes is like driving a sports car. But only go with the light shoes if you're carrying a light (<30#) load. Lifting 2 1/2 pounds with every step can make a lot of difference on a 10 mile hike. Take note if you occasionally stub your toe while bringing the rear foot forward. It's because those heavy boots are dragging your foot down. And those high tops immobilize your ankles and prevent you from quickly turning or adjusting your foot to uneven terrain. I currently use a pair of North Face Hedgehogs (17oz. each) for backpacking and a pair of New Balance all-terrains (14oz each) that I got for $40 at Kohl's for day hiking.

I also own a pair of 30-year old Italian hiking boots with Norwegian welt (40oz each) that I did a lot of backpacking in, but I would only use them now if I was going to be hiking in snow. I'm sure they would be impervious to cacti and I could step in puddles, mud and scat with impunity, but the extra weight is just not worth it to me.

Also, don't ever wear cotton socks. When they get wet (with perspiration) they loose their insulation and ventilation abilities. And they take forever to dry out. Use a sock made with Merino wool. They won't itch, they wick away water well, and they dry out relatively fast.

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Offline Undertaker

  • Ham Radio: KD5YA 1999 Ford F-350 4X4 Diesel 150 Galllons Home: Richmond, Texas
  • Mountain Lion
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  • 1338
  • Cooking BBQ for Trail Rides and Contest
    • http://www.GodboldAppraisals.Com
Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #26 on: February 18, 2007, 02:30:39 PM »
Second the Merino Wool, never wear cotton, somtimes light sock under wool, most of time just wool winter and summer.
Visiting BB since 1966, nothing like being lost and finding heaven.

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Offline Al

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Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #27 on: February 18, 2007, 02:59:52 PM »
Cotton works but it can get soggy.  A wool outersock is usually a better way to go.

Al

Advice needed on good hiking shoes/boots and gaiters
« Reply #28 on: February 23, 2007, 09:56:55 AM »
Mark D,

Your 30 year old Italian boots sound very similar to the ones that my legs complain about to my "swearing" feet.

I think I've read that a pound on your foot is equivalent to 5 pounds on your back.  I may be off a bit on the ratio, but I do recall that the ratio is more than I expected.

If someone is comfortable with a lighter boot, it can result in significantly less effort to get from Point A to Point B.
"No, that did not happen to me.  You have me confused with someone else."

 


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