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Backpacking Food

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Offline dprather

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Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2016, 01:35:18 PM »
Ditto on the group meals for dinner.  That shares the load and really does challenge us to come up with ideas that will be interesting and tasty.
Leave "quit" at the car.  Embrace the trail as your friend.  Expect to enjoy yourself, and to be amazed.

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Offline dprather

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Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #16 on: October 17, 2016, 01:38:37 PM »
Breakfasts:

  • Instant oatmeal (I add extra brown sugar pkges., dried fruit, and some instant coffee creamer).

    Gritty gravy (instant grits, white gravy mix, plus high-quality bacon bits).

These give me alternatives of a sweet and a savory breakfast.
Leave "quit" at the car.  Embrace the trail as your friend.  Expect to enjoy yourself, and to be amazed.

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Offline dprather

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Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2016, 01:40:19 PM »
Our standard practice is you are responsible for your own breakfasts, lunches and snacks but we share dinners which gives a bit of excitement to food planning as you try and come up with dinners that will surprise and please the others in the group and you only have to plan and carry a few dinners instead of all of them.  We always share one stove and pot for 2-4 people and we boil water for breakfast needs and then cook one big pot of food for dinner with hot drinks after dinner which helps with the final pot cleaning.  As i have said before, because I am a farmer, I am only able to go out in the off season and cooler months so warm food and hot drinks morning and night are important, at least to me.   :icon_biggrin:

Here is my food planning sheet that I give to folks who are not sure where to start or about amounts of each thing.  All of my food comes from a grocery store, no pre-made freeze dried meals like Mountain House.  I usually have a rotation of the 3 breakfast items and similarly with lunch items so I don't get bored, and like austingorpchomper I still like my GORP after 47 years.   :icon_eek:

Breakfast
Coffee (Italian instant expresso)
Hot Chocolate
Other potential drinks- Tang, Tea bags
Oatmeal 2 pkgs. /person/day (w/ butter in cold weather)
Instant Grits with or w/o bacon pieces, 2 pkgs. /person/day
Mueslix, Great Grains, Granola or other cold cereal w/dry milk  1-11/4 cup/person/day
Dried milk (Nido full fat!) is 1/3 cup powder to l cup water
Dried fruit bits to go with the above oatmeal or cereals ~1 oz. /person/day/ ¼ cup

Lunch
Summer Sausage  1 ½ oz./person/day
Tuna or Chicken salad packs
Cheese (jack, gouda, provolone; cheddar too greasy) 2 oz./person/day
Crackers- 1 box stone wheat thins for 6-7 days, 1 sleeve of Saltines for 3 days/person
Carrots or Dried fruit pieces ~1 oz/person/day
Soup- winter mostly, takes extra fuel
Other possible additions to go on crackers- meat spreads, tubes of peanut butter, jelly, honey,  1 tube/person/week
Mustard packs

Snacks, the continuous lunch
GORP or other trail mix 1 cup/person/day
1 14 oz. box raisins
   l  15 oz. bag M&M’s      this will do for 7 days
   1 16 oz. can peanuts
Candy bars
Hard Candy
Lemonade or other drink mixes like EmergenC
Granola bars

Dinner
One pot- 1 ½ - 2 cups cooked food /person
Soup mix (Vegetable or other flavor) with:
   Pasta (3/4-1 cup/person)
   Rice (½ cup/person)
   Mashed potatoes
   A foil pouch meat (Chicken, Turkey, Ham, Shrimp, Clams, Tuna)
   Possibly some additional spices

Prepared meals from grocery such as Lipton, Knorr, Rice-a-Roni rice or pasta dishes with or without a foil pouched meat
   Knorr pasta with sun-dried tomato sauce and pouch tuna
   Mahatma Red Beans and Rice with or without Summer Sausage
   Dirty or Creole Rice with Shrimp (Zatarans)

   May need olive oil, butter and or dry milk for some of the above

Crackers or Breads (Pita [1/2 per person], hard rolls)
Other additions: soup before meal, instant pudding deserts (colder weather)
Drinks: Hot Chocolate, Tea, Bourbon, Others?

Total weight should be less than2 lbs. /person/day or less (for me ~1.7 lbs. Per day)

This is one of my favorite dinners Chicken Curry, this would normally feed 4 but 3 hungry folks killed it the 6th night on the trail   :dance:



This is food prep for a 25 day trip



Of course everything was thoroughly repackaged.

How long do your one-pot evening meals typically take to cook?  Different systems have different burning times/fuel requirements.
Leave "quit" at the car.  Embrace the trail as your friend.  Expect to enjoy yourself, and to be amazed.

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Offline dprather

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Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2016, 01:44:41 PM »
There is no reason to eat those standard, sodium-laced trail meals.
Leave "quit" at the car.  Embrace the trail as your friend.  Expect to enjoy yourself, and to be amazed.

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Offline badknees

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Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2016, 02:20:24 PM »
There is no reason to eat those standard, sodium-laced trail meals.

My body needs sodium, especially on the hot hikes...I need to  replace fluids, salt and sugar after exercising in hot weather. Salt in your food is enough to replace what you lose through heavy sweating. If you exercise for more than an hour in hot weather, you probably need extra salt. I find that the "sodium laced trail meals" are just about right for hot weather hikes. You may have a different biology?
Not all those who wander are lost.
– J.R.R. Tolkien

Through the Mirror
http://mirrormagic.com

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2016, 02:52:01 PM »
Quote
How long do your one-pot evening meals typically take to cook?  Different systems have different burning times/fuel requirements.

Most are bring water and stuff to a boil, turn down and simmer 7 minutes, done.  The red beans and rice is a 15-20 minute simmer but sooo good. 

The freezer bag cooking method is basically boil water, pour into the bag with the stuff, stir, and then let set in the insulating cozy for 10 minutes or so, eat out of the bag, Robert here on BBC is a skilled practioner.  I am neither a fan of eating out of a bag or having to carry around all those dirty bags the rest of the trip.  It does use slightly less fuel and you can use a stove that does not simmer but I find it less flexible in some ways and possibly a wash weight wise with all the zip locks and cozies, etc..  We plan for and typically use .4 oz. of butane/per person/meal.  That is 20 meals for one person from an 8 oz. canister, enough for an 11 day trip or a 6 day trip for two people.
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

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Offline dprather

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Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #21 on: October 17, 2016, 02:53:45 PM »
There is no reason to eat those standard, sodium-laced trail meals.

My body needs sodium, especially on the hot hikes...I need to  replace fluids, salt and sugar after exercising in hot weather. Salt in your food is enough to replace what you lose through heavy sweating. If you exercise for more than an hour in hot weather, you probably need extra salt. I find that the "sodium laced trail meals" are just about right for hot weather hikes. You may have a different biology?

My wife has slowly and sneakily de-saltified me.  It has changed my tastes. 
Leave "quit" at the car.  Embrace the trail as your friend.  Expect to enjoy yourself, and to be amazed.

Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #22 on: October 17, 2016, 10:32:56 PM »
I didn't soil bags or pots for my meals. just two cups into which i put my dehydrated food, then added boiling water. for things that needed to sit, i slipped the cup into a freezer bag for a few minutes. When finishing up, i used the tortilla as a washrag basically (no that's not gross it's practical :icon_wink:  ) to wipe up the inside of the cup. I am a very lazy person and this technique required almost zero cleanup.

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #23 on: October 18, 2016, 06:37:17 AM »
I didn't soil bags or pots for my meals. just two cups into which i put my dehydrated food, then added boiling water. for things that needed to sit, i slipped the cup into a freezer bag for a few minutes. When finishing up, i used the tortilla as a washrag basically (no that's not gross it's practical :icon_wink:  ) to wipe up the inside of the cup. I am a very lazy person and this technique required almost zero cleanup.

That is very smart to rehydrate in your cups but the MH food makes that more possible versus some other dehydrated type meals. 

I always chuckle at the threads on other forums about washing dishes, I do like you do but use pita bread to wipe the pot and the bowl out before making one last hot drink, the boiling water in the pot finishes the job there, then pour some into the bowl and swish it around and then make the hot drink in the cup (usually hot chocolate that will mask the taste of what might be left of dinner or breakfast), dishes done.  I do carry a tiny scrub cloth in case something burns on or sticks around the rim of the pot, almost never use it, but no soap.  The next pot of boiling water certainly sterilizes the pot and we try and stay away from dishes that are too oily like mac and cheese.

I do have to clarify/explain (which Robert pointed out on our trip last winter) that my interest in food is different than a lot of folks.  As a market farmer that sells to lots of restaurants and market customers who really cook and travel and has been in and around the higher end food business for decades it is just natural for me to think about even backpacking meals and the ingredients as a source of pleasure more than just sustenance.  That said we don't spend lots of time cooking or cleaning but we do enjoy our meals sitting in our Thermarest chairs with our legs down in the warm sleeping bag taking in an amazing view sort of like this after a really long day:



or this enjoying the sunrise before a really long day:

temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

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Offline elhombre

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Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #24 on: October 18, 2016, 08:31:13 AM »
We have talked about this for some time, but I finally did it on my trip to Canada.  Neither of us like coffee, but enjoy some form of caffeine every morning in normal life.  But carrying a zip lock bag of caffeinated sports drink can get "heavy" for two people on a 5 - 6 day run.  I took caffeine pills and threw half of one down in the morning.  200mg / pill.  No headache, very light weight, very fast, and no mess.

I know and understand morning coffee is something of a religious experience for many people, and if you carry it, by all means enjoy it.  But for you ounce counting backpackers, this does work.
If other countries on the planet want to see America suffer and ultimately destroyed, who are they cheering for right now?  Trump, or the leftist democrats and their media supported hate machine?

Seek out the facts for yourself.  Begin by using Startpage.com,  not google.

May God Bless America!

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Offline dprather

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Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #25 on: October 18, 2016, 09:39:04 AM »
We have talked about this for some time, but I finally did it on my trip to Canada.  Neither of us like coffee, but enjoy some form of caffeine every morning in normal life.  But carrying a zip lock bag of caffeinated sports drink can get "heavy" for two people on a 5 - 6 day run.  I took caffeine pills and threw half of one down in the morning.  200mg / pill.  No headache, very light weight, very fast, and no mess.

I know and understand morning coffee is something of a religious experience for many people, and if you carry it, by all means enjoy it.  But for you ounce counting backpackers, this does work.

So the pill actually took the edge off of your caffeine crave?  Without any side effects (other kind of headache, queezy stomach)?
Leave "quit" at the car.  Embrace the trail as your friend.  Expect to enjoy yourself, and to be amazed.

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Offline badknees

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Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #26 on: October 18, 2016, 09:39:43 AM »
I picked up a handful of these at the Buc-ee's coffee bar on I-10 near Luling. I haven't tried them yet. Don't know if I will.

http://www.caffeineinformer.com/caffeine-content/stok-coffee-shots

Not all those who wander are lost.
– J.R.R. Tolkien

Through the Mirror
http://mirrormagic.com

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Offline elhombre

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Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #27 on: October 18, 2016, 10:00:51 AM »
No ill effects.  Just ate my usual oatmeal or breakfast skillet burrito, drank my morning Gatorade and Emergen-C packet, then ate half a pill.  Never gave it much thought, but maybe the food load helps regulate the entry into my system and prevents any stomach problem.

If other countries on the planet want to see America suffer and ultimately destroyed, who are they cheering for right now?  Trump, or the leftist democrats and their media supported hate machine?

Seek out the facts for yourself.  Begin by using Startpage.com,  not google.

May God Bless America!

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Offline venchka

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Backpacking Food
« Reply #28 on: October 18, 2016, 10:04:55 AM »
Cafe Bustello single serving packages. 6 servings for $1.00 @ Target. Good hot or cold.
http://www.cafebustelo.com/en/coffees/single-serve-instant-coffee

Chocolate covered espresso beans are good in your trail mix too.

Wayne


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Wayne
“Leave me alone. I know what I'm doing. K. R.”

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Offline ds9writer

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Re: Backpacking Food
« Reply #29 on: October 18, 2016, 10:39:20 AM »
Not really about packing food for backpacking, but something really funny happened to SABill and me on one backpack trip way back...

We were camped along the Animas River north of Durango, CO on our way up to Chicago Basin in the Weminuche Wilderness.  We had pre-packed a breakfast consisting of Bisquick pancake mix and powdered milk.  Add water and we'd have pancake batter.

But we also had to use the water purification tabs since the Animas water isn't safe to drink w/o them (the creeks above it were, but not the Animas itself).   So, after we waited the appropriate time for the tabs to do their thing, we poured the water into our pancake mix, and to our horror, the batter turned purple!!   :icon_eek:

We thought we were going hungry that morning, but after stirring for about 20 seconds, the batter finally turned to it's normal cream color and all was well.  Talk about relief!  Evidently some initial chemical reaction between the mix and the purified water...

The pancakes tasted especially good on the trial that morning!   :D
« Last Edit: October 18, 2016, 11:30:22 AM by ds9writer »
You don't travel to see different things,
You travel to see things differently.

 


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