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Backpacking food

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Offline Casa Grande

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Backpacking food
« Reply #30 on: August 01, 2006, 10:28:09 AM »
Quote from: "Alien"
David, why "Mountain House" only?  I think I've tried most, if not all the other brands, and they all tasted pretty good to me.  These days when I do my pre-backpacking shopping, I don't even check the brand names, I don't even bother to remember them.  And I live on freeze dried food and various bars only while out-there-somewhere-alone...


mountain house has the best taste, in my opinion.  Their food never gets wet during the freeze dried process, unlike the others, which makes the food taste very bland.  Mountain house consistantly delivers the highest quality in taste....IMHO  8)

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Offline BIBEARCH

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Backpacking food
« Reply #31 on: August 01, 2006, 11:13:53 AM »
Quote from: "David Locke"
Quote from: "Alien"
David, why "Mountain House" only?  I think I've tried most, if not all the other brands, and they all tasted pretty good to me.  These days when I do my pre-backpacking shopping, I don't even check the brand names, I don't even bother to remember them.  And I live on freeze dried food and various bars only while out-there-somewhere-alone...


mountain house has the best taste, in my opinion.  Their food never gets wet during the freeze dried process, unlike the others, which makes the food taste very bland.  Mountain house consistantly delivers the highest quality in taste....IMHO  8)


Wife and I have made numerous 7 to 10 day backpacks into the Sierra Quemada & Mesa de Anguila -- typical fare:

Mt. House (preferred) or other freeze dried dinners; usually two per day (one for each of us for evening meal);
Freeze dried fruit, nuts;
Bars of various kinds _ lighter weight, the better);
Some canned stuff for lunches, but skimp because of weight, bulk, and having to pack out the empty stinking cans (washing them if there is sufficient water available);
Crackers, cheese;
M & Ms! (must have chocolate!);
a pint of favorite alcoholic beverage to add to the evening atmosphere.

We have to punch a small hole in the freeze dried outer package to let out air and cut down on bulk because stuffing 20 meals into a bear-proof container gets tricky. Most any smelly stuff goes in the container. We don't take scented sun screen -- attracts bears, bugs, etc.

Most long backpacking trips we use the trails to access and area, then spent the entire trip exploring off-trail.
The opinion expressed above is my own and not that of the National Park Service or the Federal government.

"Government of the people, by the people, for the people . . . people hey, that's us!"? - Swami Beyondananda

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Offline bdann

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Backpacking food
« Reply #32 on: August 01, 2006, 11:25:50 AM »
After my last trip, I can now recommend the Mountain House as well, it was quite tasty.  We had chicken & rice and the chili mac, both very good.  

There's another brand I've tried, "Backpackers Pantry", or something like that.  It was gross.
WATER, It does a body good.

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Offline tjavery

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Backpacking food
« Reply #33 on: August 01, 2006, 12:26:25 PM »
Now here's a question for you experienced backpacker's: How do you heat your food? Seems like I've read most people carry a small camp stove with them. But are there non-stove alternatives?

Reason I'm asking is because in a month, my wife and I will be flying to the southwest and then hiking in Zion N.P. (gasp  :shock: please don't tell my mistress- Big Bend) I'm not sure I can take a little stove (specifically, the fuel container) on the plane, even in check-in luggage.

Does anyone make those little chemical heating packs like you can get in military MRE's? Those would be perfect.

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Offline BIBEARCH

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Backpacking food
« Reply #34 on: August 01, 2006, 12:41:23 PM »
Quote from: "tjavery"
Now here's a question for you experienced backpacker's: How do you heat your food? Seems like I've read most people carry a small camp stove with them. But are there non-stove alternatives?

Reason I'm asking is because in a month, my wife and I will be flying to the southwest and then hiking in Zion N.P. (gasp  :shock: please don't tell my mistress- Big Bend) I'm not sure I can take a little stove (specifically, the fuel container) on the plane, even in check-in luggage.


I seem to recall a thread somewhere on this chat site where that was discussed and maybe David or ShaneA can lead you there. You may be able to take the stove sans-fuel on the plane and buy some when you arrive. You'd have to find a way to dispose/give away what was left.
The opinion expressed above is my own and not that of the National Park Service or the Federal government.

"Government of the people, by the people, for the people . . . people hey, that's us!"? - Swami Beyondananda

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SHANEA

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I fold...
« Reply #35 on: August 01, 2006, 12:49:21 PM »
Quote from: "BIBEARCH"
[ShaneA can lead you there...


I fold...  Do a search maybe and find something.  I'd suggest checking with local outfitters out that way and see if they have rental units.

OR mail just the unit, sans fuel, to "someone out there" maybe the local post office will "hold" it for you and then purchase fuel on the way out there.

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Offline RichardM

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Backpacking food
« Reply #36 on: August 01, 2006, 01:21:01 PM »
Best to check with your airline for suggestions and regulations.  At a minimum you'll be buying fuel after you get there.  Mailing the stove to your motel (assuming you're staying indoors at least one night) is a good option.  I'm not sure what the airline's policy is on solid fuel stoves like the Esbit Pocket Stove from REI.com.

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Offline Al

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Backpacking food
« Reply #37 on: August 01, 2006, 01:42:50 PM »
You can bring a propane or butane stove but not the gas and buy propane or butane once you land.  White gas stoves are out because even if you pour out the gas there will still be some flammable vapor in the tank.  I would check with the airline, but this is a pretty good rule of thumb.

Al

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Offline tjavery

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Backpacking food
« Reply #38 on: August 01, 2006, 01:49:33 PM »
Quote from: "RichardM"
...I'm not sure what the airline's policy is on solid fuel stoves like the Esbit Pocket Stove from REI.com.


Thanks for the link, Richard. That's a neat little stove. However, I did read this on the site:

Flammable item - must be sent via surface (ground) shipping. Sorry, no air shipping. Can not be sent to Alaska, Hawaii, APO, FPO or international addresses.. Imported.

I think perhaps it's safe to say that it won't be allowed on the plane  :cry:

Thanks for the other suggestions, y'all. However, my situation is further complicated because I'm flying into Las Vegas early Sunday morning, and then immediately driving to Zion. The hiking/camping starts the instant my feet hit the ground in the park  :D

I wonder if a miliary surplus store would have those chemical heating packs, or if I could just buy MREs from them? I guess my ultimate goal here is to have hot food when camping out and bring in minimum gear.

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Offline TexasGirl

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Backpacking food
« Reply #39 on: August 01, 2006, 01:53:11 PM »
You can, however, mail the Esbit tabs to your destination.  That's the stove I got for our trip last week, and it burns very hot.  We used less than a tab per meal.  Sweetie the old-Army guy was all-around impressed with the little contraption.  :D
As a matter of fact, I _do_ have an opinion on that....

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Offline Bobcat

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Backpacking food
« Reply #40 on: August 01, 2006, 02:48:40 PM »
Quote from: "BIBEARCH"
Quote from: "David Locke"
Quote from: "Alien"
David, why "Mountain House" only?  I think I've tried most, if not all the other brands, and they all tasted pretty good to me.  These days when I do my pre-backpacking shopping, I don't even check the brand names, I don't even bother to remember them.  And I live on freeze dried food and various bars only while out-there-somewhere-alone...


mountain house has the best taste, in my opinion.  Their food never gets wet during the freeze dried process, unlike the others, which makes the food taste very bland.  Mountain house consistantly delivers the highest quality in taste....IMHO  8)


Wife and I have made numerous 7 to 10 day backpacks into the Sierra Quemada & Mesa de Anguila -- typical fare:

Mt. House (preferred) or other freeze dried dinners; usually two per day (one for each of us for evening meal);
Freeze dried fruit, nuts;
Bars of various kinds _ lighter weight, the better);
Some canned stuff for lunches, but skimp because of weight, bulk, and having to pack out the empty stinking cans (washing them if there is sufficient water available);
Crackers, cheese;
M & Ms! (must have chocolate!);
a pint of favorite alcoholic beverage to add to the evening atmosphere.

We have to punch a small hole in the freeze dried outer package to let out air and cut down on bulk because stuffing 20 meals into a bear-proof container gets tricky. Most any smelly stuff goes in the container. We don't take scented sun screen -- attracts bears, bugs, etc.

Most long backpacking trips we use the trails to access and area, then spent the entire trip exploring off-trail.


Gotta remember, Tom, that if you don't packout your cans, they will take on an archaeological significance in the future :roll:
Location Location Location

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SHANEA

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Looking For....
« Reply #41 on: August 01, 2006, 05:05:43 PM »
Quote from: "Robert"
I bought it at H-E-B. Not sure if it was Jack Links or not.


Still looking for the cooked ground meat in a foil container that does not require fridgeration.  Jack Links used to make it, but they don't anymore.  I checked at HEB and could not find anything like that.  Does anyone know what it is?

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Offline Casa Grande

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Backpacking food
« Reply #42 on: August 01, 2006, 05:38:54 PM »
another way to heat your food is by using a Heater pack.....

Heater Packs

these come with some of the MRE kits now and it's the same technology that the "heater meals" come with.  It's a dry brick that is activated in a very small amount of water. You stick this block in a bag or box, add water and in about 5 minutes you've got a really hot oven that steams pretty hot. Pretty cool method without using fuel or a stove, but kinda pricey.  I've used it once before while backpacking the Rim a few years ago and it works great!  I don't anymore because it's expensive and I've got a tiny little stove that works very well :)

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Offline Al

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Backpacking food
« Reply #43 on: August 01, 2006, 05:48:34 PM »
Look over where the chili and canned meats are.  I recall seeing some products in foil/cardboard packaging.  If fact I bought some chili in a box the other day.  It's irradiated to strerilize instead of heated.

Al

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Offline tjavery

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Backpacking food
« Reply #44 on: August 02, 2006, 07:55:08 AM »
Quote from: "David Locke"
another way to heat your food is by using a Heater pack.....

Heater Packs


That's perfect. Thanks!

 


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