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Over-estimating your experience or under-estimating the terrain in a place like Big Bend can result in serious injury or death. Use the information and advice found here wisely. Climb/Hike/Camp/Drive at your own risk.

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Camp Stoves

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Offline presidio

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #30 on: April 26, 2008, 10:48:00 PM »
:icon_eek: This one is the exact one that went up in flames on me....I must have either really botched it or it was defective.....knowi ng how green I was on that trip, I more than likely botched it...I might have gotten fuel on the side and when lit...poof.

It sounds like you may not have had the tank lid on quite tight enough. What may have happened was it was snug enough for you to not notice and when you pumped it up it held pressure well enough to get the stove started but was also venting around the cap. Fine vapor....poof...and the thing is jetting flames. The other possibility would be a defective generator...the thing in the burner stem that occasionally needs replacing. While the stove may have been new, you could have gotten one with a bad part that made it through the final assembly process.

If you used it since then and have had no other problems, I would suspect a loose cap.
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--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline Peach

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #31 on: April 26, 2008, 11:23:04 PM »
:icon_eek: This one is the exact one that went up in flames on me....I must have either really botched it or it was defective.....knowi ng how green I was on that trip, I more than likely botched it...I might have gotten fuel on the side and when lit...poof.

It sounds like you may not have had the tank lid on quite tight enough. What may have happened was it was snug enough for you to not notice and when you pumped it up it held pressure well enough to get the stove started but was also venting around the cap. Fine vapor....poof...and the thing is jetting flames. The other possibility would be a defective generator...the thing in the burner stem that occasionally needs replacing. While the stove may have been new, you could have gotten one with a bad part that made it through the final assembly process.

If you used it since then and have had no other problems, I would suspect a loose cap.

I haven't used it since then.  It's still on the shelf in my shed.  I may get it out and try again just to see....again watch for flames  :icon_eek:

I really am curious as to what happened that made it burst into flames....

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Offline Peach

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #32 on: April 26, 2008, 11:25:47 PM »
Well, I'm home with my new stove...MSR Whisperlite!  Going to try it out tomorrow out on the driveway....if you see smoke and flames off in the distance towards Brenham, I've blown up another stove...


 :rolling:
Congrats Peach! :eusa_clap:
It's a proven classic and should last you a lifetime. :icon_smile:

I'll keep an eye out for the smoke and flames.
As will those ever curious neighbors of yours.  :icon_wink:

But ahhhh...my neighbors need the entertainment! :icon_lol:

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Offline bdann

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #33 on: April 26, 2008, 11:26:56 PM »
I like this one. Not the lightest, or the best for doing anything but boiling water, but.........it works well, and I think it is cool!


I'm a Jetboil fan myself.  I'm a coffee drinker, and I can make an excellent cup with my Jetboil and the French press attachment.  And like badknees said, it's cool!!!  It all fits together so perfectly into a nice neat package, and it boils water FAST.
WATER, It does a body good.

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Offline Peach

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #34 on: April 27, 2008, 12:16:39 AM »
I like this one. Not the lightest, or the best for doing anything but boiling water, but.........it works well, and I think it is cool!


I'm a Jetboil fan myself.  I'm a coffee drinker, and I can make an excellent cup with my Jetboil and the French press attachment.  And like badknees said, it's cool!!!  It all fits together so perfectly into a nice neat package, and it boils water FAST.

Now the coffee really got my attention.  I'll have to check that out. 

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Offline bdann

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #35 on: April 27, 2008, 12:44:37 AM »
I like this one. Not the lightest, or the best for doing anything but boiling water, but.........it works well, and I think it is cool!


I'm a Jetboil fan myself.  I'm a coffee drinker, and I can make an excellent cup with my Jetboil and the French press attachment.  And like badknees said, it's cool!!!  It all fits together so perfectly into a nice neat package, and it boils water FAST.

Now the coffee really got my attention.  I'll have to check that out. 

They have all kinds of overpriced accessories... http://www.jetboil.com/Products/Accessories - but I just had to have the coffee press, and it really works well. 

Fuel, burner, and cooking vessel all in one simple unit, takes about the same amount of space in your pack as a 34oz water bottle.
WATER, It does a body good.

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #36 on: April 27, 2008, 07:43:54 AM »
I've got/had 6 or 7 stoves and used maybe a half a dozen more (it's taken over 30 years of backpacking to accumulate them).  There are a few key traits that any stove I carry must have (pretty much in order of importance)

1. as light as possible for the features (see below)

2. it must be able to simmer, while not a crazy back country gourmet, I do like a good hot meal and many times that might require some slow/low cooking.  This knocks out jet boils, alcohol stoves, esbit tabs, MSR XGKs (of which I own one for snow melting when winter camping) and other boil only models.

3. ease of assembly and maintenence (because it is going to happen, think in the dark with cold hands)

4. availability of fuel

5. ability to hold a 2 quart pot (maybe even 3 qt. at times) as I always go with 2 and sometimes more people and we only take one stove.

For nearly 30 years the winner was the Svea 123 without pump, solid, stable, few parts, easy to prime once you mastered it, 16 oz. plus additional 4 oz. fuel bottle for trips longer than 2 days

My favorite liquid/multi-fuel stove, hands down, is the Brunton/Optimus Nova (now replaced by the ultimate stove the Vapor that does butane too http://www.brunton.com/product.php?id=428   ), extremely well designed, especially the quick connection to the fuel bottle, stable, great simmer, bomb proof.  20 oz. with fuel bottle and wind screen.  I have hiked with too many people with MSR Whisperlights/Dragonflys/XGKs/Simmerlights who have had to fight with them, loose parts, broken plastic pump parts, you couldn't give me one.   :pissed:

For absolute ease and light weight (in temperatures over 20 degrees) I use a Brunton Crux (now replaced by the Flex) canister stove 3 oz. plus 4 oz. in fuel empty canister weight.  It uses any brand screw on canister so it is easier to find them.  One 8 oz canister will go 3-5 days for two people depending on how much cooking is going on.

I do own a MSR Windpro canister stove for larger pots or winter use as you can invert the canister and get liquid feed from it in cold conditions (It's OK but I still think it could work better) 9 oz. plus the 4 oz of the empty canister.

The difficulty has become in flying to a hiking destination.  The liquid fuel stoves can now be deemed not legal to take on planes even when completely dry and aired out.  I have had to mail them ahead to Big Bend for example but the fuel (either unleaded or coleman is easy to find).  The canister stoves are no trouble to fly with but sometimes finding canisters can be difficult once you land.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2008, 01:35:29 PM by mule ears »
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
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Offline randell

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #37 on: May 12, 2008, 09:31:50 PM »
Doesn't get more lightweight than a Super Cat. Pretty easy to use, just pour a little fuel in and light. Of course, it's pretty much just good for boiling water. Denatured alcohol is the fuel of choice and very easy to find.
http://jwbasecamp.com/Articles/SuperCat/index.html

I spent some time drilling 30 holes in a 3oz tuna can and it boiled water in 10 minutes using denatured alcohol.



Then I decided to try an empty 14 oz black bean can I found in the recycle bin.  I didn't drill in this one, I just punched a random number of holes in it with a church-key bottle opener.  It took 75% less time to finish and it boiled water in 4 minutes flat. 






I think this will be my stove the next time I fly to camp since I can't take a stove or fuel on the plane.  I can just take a can and stop by the hardware store for alcohol on the way to camp.
There's nothing like a good quest to get you intimate with a place. - Tom Clynes

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Offline badknees

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #38 on: May 12, 2008, 09:49:00 PM »
Doesn't get more lightweight than a Super Cat. Pretty easy to use, just pour a little fuel in and light. Of course, it's pretty much just good for boiling water. Denatured alcohol is the fuel of choice and very easy to find.
http://jwbasecamp.com/Articles/SuperCat/index.html

I spent some time drilling 30 holes in a 3oz tuna can and it boiled water in 10 minutes using denatured alcohol.



Then I decided to try an empty 14 oz black bean can I found in the recycle bin.  I didn't drill in this one, I just punched a random number of holes in it with a church-key bottle opener.  It took 75% less time to finish and it boiled water in 4 minutes flat. 






I think this will be my stove the next time I fly to camp since I can't take a stove or fuel on the plane.  I can just take a can and stop by the hardware store for alcohol on the way to camp.

Looks good in the garage, how about in the wind?
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Offline randell

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #39 on: May 12, 2008, 10:38:10 PM »
That's what windscreens are for.
There's nothing like a good quest to get you intimate with a place. - Tom Clynes

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Offline Al

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #40 on: May 12, 2008, 10:57:28 PM »
I like that!  How do you know how much alcohol to start out with?

Al

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Offline EdB

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #41 on: May 12, 2008, 11:21:03 PM »
I think this will be my stove the next time I fly to camp since I can't take a stove or fuel on the plane.  I can just take a can and stop by the hardware store for alcohol on the way to camp.

Nice job on the stove Randell. The 'no fuel on a plane thing' was one of the reasons I went with an alcohol stove. I haven't had any problems with taking denatured alcohol on a plane.

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Offline Al

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #42 on: May 13, 2008, 12:00:56 AM »
But what about the increased cost of food, particularly in third world countries (although we are feeling the squeeze here too) as a direct result of ethanol use as fuel.  What is the highest and best use of ethanol?  I have my opinion and it does not involve denaturing. i.e., adulterating, it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denatured_alcohol.

We should be using fossil fuels instead of ethanol while the getting is good.  No doubt the big picture will change even more than recently but should one feel guilty now?  Hell no.  Use it or lose it as they say.

Sorry if this appears a bit ironical (as they say in east Texas) . . .  but it's a bit slow around here,
Al

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Offline Peach

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #43 on: May 13, 2008, 12:36:05 AM »
Doesn't get more lightweight than a Super Cat. Pretty easy to use, just pour a little fuel in and light. Of course, it's pretty much just good for boiling water. Denatured alcohol is the fuel of choice and very easy to find.
http://jwbasecamp.com/Articles/SuperCat/index.html

I spent some time drilling 30 holes in a 3oz tuna can and it boiled water in 10 minutes using denatured alcohol.



Then I decided to try an empty 14 oz black bean can I found in the recycle bin.  I didn't drill in this one, I just punched a random number of holes in it with a church-key bottle opener.  It took 75% less time to finish and it boiled water in 4 minutes flat. 






I think this will be my stove the next time I fly to camp since I can't take a stove or fuel on the plane.  I can just take a can and stop by the hardware store for alcohol on the way to camp.

I'm going to try the second one this weekend...lightweig ht and easy idea...

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Offline randell

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Re: Camp Stoves
« Reply #44 on: May 13, 2008, 08:48:12 AM »
I like that!  How do you know how much alcohol to start out with?

Al

A few ounces will burn for 12 minutes.  If you need more burn time, you can use two cans and switch burners so the hot one can cool off and you can refill it.  I'm sure there are folks who need something more, but all I need is to boil water.



But what about the increased cost of food, particularly in third world countries (although we are feeling the squeeze here too) as a direct result of ethanol use as fuel.  What is the highest and best use of ethanol?  I have my opinion and it does not involve denaturing. i.e., adulterating, it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denatured_alcohol.

We should be using fossil fuels instead of ethanol while the getting is good.  No doubt the big picture will change even more than recently but should one feel guilty now?  Hell no.  Use it or lose it as they say.

Sorry if this appears a bit ironical (as they say in east Texas) . . .  but it's a bit slow around here,
Al

If I could use gasoline, I would, especially since it is even easier to find.  However, it is more difficult to transport, it stinks, and it is much more volatile and dangerous to burn in an open container.
There's nothing like a good quest to get you intimate with a place. - Tom Clynes

 


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