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Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up

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Offline trtlrock

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Re: Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2009, 07:25:19 PM »
Great shot of the ME sunset.  I hope this setup works for you.   :crossedfingers:

I'm a bit dubious, simply because we've found that our Ridgerests & Z-Rests get punctured through quite a bit.  They always need to be checked for impaled spines & hitch-hiking glochids before sitting, folding, or rolling.  Can't really see them protecting any air mattress longer than a week or two.

Looks awful comfy though, and my hips have already pre-registered their strongly-worded   :pissed:  request for more padding on the next BB trip...
John & Tess

"...and I'll face each day with a smile, for the time that I've been given's such a little while..." - Arthur Lee

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up
« Reply #16 on: May 29, 2009, 06:33:29 AM »
Great shot of the ME sunset.  I hope this setup works for you.   :crossedfingers:

I'm a bit dubious, simply because we've found that our Ridgerests & Z-Rests get punctured through quite a bit.  They always need to be checked for impaled spines & hitch-hiking glochids before sitting, folding, or rolling.  Can't really see them protecting any air mattress longer than a week or two.

Looks awful comfy though, and my hips have already pre-registered their strongly-worded   :pissed:  request for more padding on the next BB trip...

Yeah nothing is totally puncture proof, like the spine that came right through the sole of my shoe on this last trip, but with the normal care given in preparing a sleeping or sitting site for an inflatable Thermarest this set up has been good so far. The high level of comfort is really the biggest reason my hips and shoulders started talking to me about it.  :eusa_naughty:

temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
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Offline trtlrock

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Re: Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up
« Reply #17 on: July 01, 2009, 02:59:03 PM »
So Alex -- I'm beginning to buy into your concept here. :icon_smile:

I got a short (47") NeoAir recently, and I'm wondering if you think it will mate well with the new Compack Chair? TAR doesn't seem to know or have an opinion.  :eusa_think:

Did you or can you try the Compack with your 47" ProLite & no other padding? I'm primarily interested in whether the 47" needs to be folded, or whether it will work well simply extending up & out of the 'top' sleeve of the Compack. And then maybe you can extrapolate from there keeping in mind the major differences between the NeoAir & the ProLite:

* NeoAir 2" thick, although some deflation when in the chair might be desirable. Do you think it would be necessary, or just desirable?
* NeoAir horizontal baffles should mean less flexibility in exactly where one would choose to fold it, and then there's the question of whether a (partially deflated?) NeoAir will fit into the Compack sleeve when folded.

I'm not sure I'm ready to risk the NeoAir in BiBe yet, but we're heading to the antithesis of BiBe soon (New Zealand) and I'm hoping the 47" NA + Compack will work in some fashion.

edit -- not worried about keeping NA inside Compack when sleeping, just wondering about NA in Compack for back support & comfy seating.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2009, 03:29:07 PM by trtlrock »
John & Tess

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up
« Reply #18 on: July 03, 2009, 07:10:59 AM »
So Alex -- I'm beginning to buy into your concept here. :icon_smile:

I got a short (47") NeoAir recently, and I'm wondering if you think it will mate well with the new Compack Chair? TAR doesn't seem to know or have an opinion.  :eusa_think:

Did you or can you try the Compack with your 47" ProLite & no other padding? I'm primarily interested in whether the 47" needs to be folded, or whether it will work well simply extending up & out of the 'top' sleeve of the Compack. And then maybe you can extrapolate from there keeping in mind the major differences between the NeoAir & the ProLite:

* NeoAir 2" thick, although some deflation when in the chair might be desirable. Do you think it would be necessary, or just desirable?
* NeoAir horizontal baffles should mean less flexibility in exactly where one would choose to fold it, and then there's the question of whether a (partially deflated?) NeoAir will fit into the Compack sleeve when folded.

I'm not sure I'm ready to risk the NeoAir in BiBe yet, but we're heading to the antithesis of BiBe soon (New Zealand) and I'm hoping the 47" NA + Compack will work in some fashion.


trtlrock, I think it would work fine, might have to adjust the inflation a bit.  When I use a 47" prolite in the chair I fold the extra up, in the pad pocket, under my legs.  With the NA you would have too much thickness to fold there so you would just have to let the extra stick out the top of the chair.  As to the fold I am sure you can move it slightly to make it happen between baffles.

I happen to have two 47" prolites so I put them together in the chair to show you what it might look like (it is only 2" thick instead of 2.5" but...) Front view



Back view



It looks very tall above the chair but feels just fine sitting in it. I would order a chair from REI and if it doesn't work take it back.

We are going to be in New Zealand this fall too, early Nov. not backpacking though, part business, part nontraditional tourist.  :icon_wink:
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
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Offline trtlrock

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Re: Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up
« Reply #19 on: July 03, 2009, 07:53:46 AM »
Cool -- thanks for the pics. Looks like the extended 10-14" sticking out of the top will stay rigid enough for it to work.

ps -- just PM'd you about NZ...
John & Tess

"...and I'll face each day with a smile, for the time that I've been given's such a little while..." - Arthur Lee

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up
« Reply #20 on: November 15, 2009, 08:56:32 AM »
Here is the final field testing update.

On my last trip to Utah the 2 pads and new silnylon chair worked perfectly. This picture is of a camp on solid sandstone, no sand or other material to help. My partner had an 1.5" Thermarest Prolite 4 (17 oz. for the 47" model, 14.5 oz. for my two pads together) and complained a bit about sore hips and shoulders (he is 6 years younger than me by the way). I just deflated my pad a little to give hip and shoulder relief but still had the closed cell padding underneath that to give a bit of additional comfort. I slept like a baby for 5 nights.



Of course the chair is invaluable to enjoying long evenings in camp and the long views from camp.  :icon_biggrin:



The lightweight chair held up well on the abrasive sandstone surfaces (no signs of wear) but I did mostly have it on a groundsheet. I did cut off that middle strap, no need for it that I can see, at least the way I use it.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2009, 12:00:28 PM by mule ears »
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

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Offline PacingTheCage

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Re: Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up
« Reply #21 on: February 03, 2010, 03:55:49 PM »
I must confess.  I am amazed that you are not using a tent. I've gone "tentless" in other places but I'm a little scared, no downright scared, of doing that in the Bend.  You know, rattle snakes, tarantulas, scorpions, etc.  But, I've never been there either so I'm sure I my imagination is having a lot of influence. I'd like to lose the weight of the tent though. 

Great info on the sleeping pads.  I'm 54, 6'3" and my knees, shoulders, and hips are always talking to me.  And I prefer to sleep on my side too.

I'm heading out to BB for my first trip in 7 days!

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Offline randell

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Re: Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up
« Reply #22 on: February 03, 2010, 04:58:41 PM »
I must confess.  I am amazed that you are not using a tent. I've gone "tentless" in other places but I'm a little scared, no downright scared, of doing that in the Bend.  You know, rattle snakes, tarantulas, scorpions, etc.  But, I've never been there either so I'm sure I my imagination is having a lot of influence. I'd like to lose the weight of the tent though. 

Great info on the sleeping pads.  I'm 54, 6'3" and my knees, shoulders, and hips are always talking to me.  And I prefer to sleep on my side too.

I'm heading out to BB for my first trip in 7 days!

If you are going in the winter there are not rattlesnakes and not really any insects.  I slept on the ground in January last year in the park and did not hear or see anything at night.  I mean nothing.  Not even a bug singing. 
There's nothing like a good quest to get you intimate with a place. - Tom Clynes

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Offline Robert

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Re: Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up
« Reply #23 on: February 03, 2010, 05:06:42 PM »
Quote
You know, rattle snakes, tarantulas, scorpions, etc.

Most of us do our backpacking in the winter months when the weather is milder. With the shorter days and cold nights the "critters" are not as active as in the spring and summer. That goes for the insects and rodents as well.

Randall is right, the nights in the park are usually very quiet.
« Last Edit: February 03, 2010, 05:09:28 PM by Robert »

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Offline CactusFlower

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Re: Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up
« Reply #24 on: February 03, 2010, 07:30:47 PM »
We usually don't use a tent in BiBe but bring a tarp in case of rain.  Last Fall, at Pinnacles, we learned we should have one tarp per person because it rained and we were a little squished.  Lesson learned!  My mom read somewhere that laying a rope around your sleeping bag will keep snakes away because other snakes will think the rope is a snake and not cross it.  Not sure I believed it, but it brought her piece of mind.  :-)  We are doing Banta in about a month and have discussed taking tent poles and rain fly for the group.

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Offline txhiker

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Re: Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up
« Reply #25 on: February 04, 2010, 01:17:27 AM »
Here is my setup which I do suggest. OR nighthavent

It weighs just over 2 pounds and is for 2 people. It doesn't have a floor and uses your hiking poles. It is covered all around to protect from insects and has several vents. I have slept tentless a few times but I stopped because in the cold, a tent makes the indoor temperature warmer, so you can get away with a lighter sleeping bag. In all other seasons there are mosquito's (even in Big Bend) so I don't dare to go without something to protect me from the vampires. And then you don't have to worry about the rain.
As far as padding, I just got a Pacific Outdoors Ether Thermo 6

which is lighter than a Thermarest prolite 4 and gives more cushing since it is 2.5 inches tall.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2010, 01:02:01 PM by RichardM »
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Offline mule ears

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Re: Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up
« Reply #26 on: February 04, 2010, 07:33:13 AM »
I must confess.&nbsp; I am amazed that you are not using a tent. I've gone "tentless" in other places but I'm a little scared, no downright scared, of doing that in the Bend.&nbsp; You know, rattle snakes, tarantulas, scorpions, etc.&nbsp; But, I've never been there either so I'm sure I my imagination is having a lot of influence. I'd like to lose the weight of the tent though.&nbsp;


I'm heading out to BB for my first trip in 7 days!

This is the definitive thread on  sleeping without a tent from the early days of the board, some good stuff here.

Like the rest say, in the winter all those cold blooded critters are just not around.

Have a great first trip to the Bend and make sure to give us a report and pictures for Homero!
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

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Offline PacingTheCage

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Re: Maybe the perfect lightweight sleeping pad set up
« Reply #27 on: February 04, 2010, 09:54:54 AM »
Many thanks!

 


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