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Big Bend Conservancy

Over-estimating your experience or under-estimating the terrain in a place like Big Bend can result in serious injury or death. Use the information and advice found here wisely. Climb/Hike/Camp/Drive at your own risk.

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What's in your pack?

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Offline KDann

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Re: What's in your pack?
« Reply #30 on: June 28, 2006, 08:48:39 PM »
Quote from: "SHANEA"
Quote from: "bdann"

heh....no way.


I don't know, those pics of you and your brother up there looked really heavy.  Thought you might try to cram some more in there.   :lol:

Sherpa Service - I tell you BIBE needs a sherpa service.  There are probably a lot, ok a few, that would like to have sherpas carry all of their equipment to the rim and setup camp for them, that way they could take a leisurly climb up with just bare essentials.  The BIBE Sherpas will carry your backpacks, water, food, etc.  Setup your tents, cook you dinner/breakfast/etc.  I'll import the Sherpas from Nepal for this and give them work during the downtime of the year over there.  Then, when the Everest expeditions need them, we'll send them back.  Share-A-Sherpa...
Sounds like an idea to me.  Shoot, a little climb like this they could run up it with 80lbs on their back!  I'll start a trend, do this at BIBE, Guadalupe, etc.


I've pretty much got my backpack packed now...it's acutally pretty light. I'm sure it's lighter than the last time we went to the southrim...or I hope.   :shock:

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Offline RichardM

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Re: What's in your pack?
« Reply #31 on: June 28, 2006, 10:02:30 PM »
Quote from: "KDann"
Quote from: "SHANEA"
Quote from: "bdann"

heh....no way.

I don't know, those pics of you and your brother up there looked really heavy.  Thought you might try to cram some more in there.   :lol:

I've pretty much got my backpack packed now...it's acutally pretty light. I'm sure it's lighter than the last time we went to the southrim...or I hope.   :shock:

Yeah, but have you got all of your water packed yet?  Figure 8 pounds per gallon with at least 1.5 gallons per day....

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Offline bdann

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What's in your pack?
« Reply #32 on: June 28, 2006, 10:14:00 PM »
i've got six liters, which I believe is just over 1.5 gallons.  pack doesn't feel too heavy, though I suppose the final verdict on that won't come until about an hour into hour hike.   :lol:

(Kenny is sitting here next to me, he just picked up his pack and exclaimed "this is heavy!") :wink:
WATER, It does a body good.

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Offline TheWildWestGuy

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What's in your pack?
« Reply #33 on: June 29, 2006, 09:40:17 PM »
I always plan my backpacking trips to camp near water if possible, "near" being anywhere from 300 yards to 3 miles.  Like David L. I carry a "First Need" water filtration system,  bulky but very effective and back-flushable in the field.  I usually wrap my sweat-rag around the intake to keep it clean as a pre-filter and have drunk out of the Rio Grande and lots of algae-choked springs without ever any ill effect.  It's an expensive system but much better than carrying more water than I need to get me to my destination plus a little reserve just in case.   Other than that I generally pack heavy with lots of canned goods and liquid pain-killer to help me sleep at night.  I would rather carry a heavy pack and go in-style than eat any dehydrated (Mtn House) food.  I usually freeze a water bottle and rap a nice cooked steak in tin foil, put it next to the water bottle, and rap both in a towel for the first nights dinner.  Nothing beats a great steak and cold ice-water for dinner in the backcountry.
For cooking I use a Optimus 1-2-3 liquid fuel stove which is so old it should be in a museum but its been faithful and flawless for many years as is worth the extra weight.  Besides I need a good workout..  TWWG

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Offline Al

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Words of Wisdom
« Reply #34 on: June 29, 2006, 10:57:33 PM »
TheWildWestGuy,

You have the right attitude for sure!  A little extra weight = extra enjoyment down the trail.  I am no longer one to talk too big, I'm too out of shape, but in my younger days we were into the art of heavy weight backpacking.  You don't want to go to all the good time, trouble and effort to hike your ass out in the middle of nowhere, which was your goal, and be miserable.  Been there. Done that.

Again, good advice.   =D>

Al

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SHANEA

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Re: Words of Wisdom
« Reply #35 on: June 29, 2006, 11:02:02 PM »
Quote from: "Al"
A little extra weight = extra enjoyment down the trail....Al


So I guess you won't need my sherpa service. 8)

On the contrary, I prefer light and mobile, the lighter the better.  VERY LIGHT AND VERY MOBILE.  I've gone so far as to cut out the little tags on all the clothes, etc.  Every 1/100 of an ounce matters. 8)

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Offline Al

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Fuel savings!
« Reply #36 on: June 29, 2006, 11:06:38 PM »
Have Aliens taken over Shane or what????

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Offline Al

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Around Elephant Tusk
« Reply #37 on: June 29, 2006, 11:47:58 PM »
Quote from: "TheWildWestGuy"
I always plan my backpacking trips to camp near water if possible, "near" being anywhere from 300 yards to 3 miles.  Like David L. I carry a "First Need" water filtration system,  bulky but very effective and back-flushable in the field.  I usually wrap my sweat-rag around the intake to keep it clean as a pre-filter and have drunk out of the Rio Grande and lots of algae-choked springs without ever any ill effect.  It's an expensive system but much better than carrying more water than I need to get me to my destination plus a little reserve just in case.   Other than that I generally pack heavy with lots of canned goods and liquid pain-killer to help me sleep at night.  I would rather carry a heavy pack and go in-style than eat any dehydrated (Mtn House) food.  I usually freeze a water bottle and rap a nice cooked steak in tin foil, put it next to the water bottle, and rap both in a towel for the first nights dinner.  Nothing beats a great steak and cold ice-water for dinner in the backcountry.
For cooking I use a Optimus 1-2-3 liquid fuel stove which is so old it should be in a museum but its been faithful and flawless for many years as is worth the extra weight.  Besides I need a good workout..  TWWG


A really nice area to zone camp is around Elephant Tusk.  Zone camping is great if you want to get away from it all.  Set your camp a hill or two away from the trail and you will be alone.  Big Bend is one of the few National Parks where you can truely be alone and contemplate your navel, as desired.

Get a permit to zone camp around Elephant Tusk and decide where you want to go in.  We've done both ways: from the north and the east.  There are springs on the topo maps that are pretty darned reliable, at least in December/January.  One year we were zone camping there and water was running down in streams, like Colorado or New Mexico, which is the exeption and not the rule.  

Anyway, we've always found water. A water purification pump is God sent.  If you don't have one at least bring iodine tablets.  Planning is essential.  If you are relying on springs, you must make finding water your goal and NOT getting somewhere else unless you know there is water where you're going and you can get there pretty early the next day.  We have never been short of water around Elephant tusk, but also we made finding water our first priority, a good night's sleep, waiting for the sun to rise over the horizon and eating sausage egg potato with salsa burritoes for breakfast.  

I probably shouldn't mention the turkey pan with heavy duty tin foil lining, raised off the ground, we use in the evening to burn the charcoal and Duralog we haul in, in order to have a perfectly legal back country campfire.  In the winter there is nothing like having a small source of warmth and the smudge of Duralog wafting into one's nose.  

We haul it in and haul it back out.

As TWWG points out, by camping where you can get water, you can save weight and bring other desirable stuff that is otherwise far far away while on the trail.  

Al

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Offline Al

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Re: What's in your pack?
« Reply #38 on: June 30, 2006, 12:20:19 AM »
Quote from: "RichardM"
Quote from: "KDann"
Quote from: "SHANEA"
Quote from: "bdann"

heh....no way.

I don't know, those pics of you and your brother up there looked really heavy.  Thought you might try to cram some more in there.   :lol:

I've pretty much got my backpack packed now...it's acutally pretty light. I'm sure it's lighter than the last time we went to the southrim...or I hope.   :shock:

Yeah, but have you got all of your water packed yet?  Figure 8 pounds per gallon with at least 1.5 gallons per day....


That would be 8.34 lb/gal, which is more than 5 oz heavier than a pound.  Water is heavy stuff . . . but absolutely necessary. Better too much than not enough.  Worse case you can drink it and lighten your load!

Al

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SHANEA

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Re: Around Elephant Tusk
« Reply #39 on: June 30, 2006, 12:33:45 AM »
Quote from: "Al"
I probably shouldn't mention the turkey pan with heavy duty tin foil lining, raised off the ground, we use in the evening to burn the charcoal and Duralog we haul in, in order to have a perfectly legal back country campfire.  In the winter there is nothing like having a small source of warmth and the smudge of Duralog wafting into one's nose.  

We haul it in and haul it back out.


I guess I'm missing something and certainly am not trying to start anything, but I don't understand how that is a perfectly legal back country campfire

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1. GROUNDFIRES AND WOODFIRES ARE PROHIBITED.
Use only gas stoves or charcoal within a BBQ grill. Pack out all evidence of use.
Note: charcoal fires are only allowed at backcountry roadside campsites and not allowed in the High Chisos or zone camping areas.


http://www.nps.gov/bibe/backcountry/bc_regs.htm

I always thought that ground/wood fires were not permitted because of (1) fire danger (2) it adds to the "haze" in BIBE which has gotten very bad (3) not everyone would pack out their embers, etc - some would bury it - some would leave it and charcoal lasts a very long time.  

Quote
Fire
Fire danger is always an important safety consideration in Big Bend. Wood or ground fires are not permitted in the park, and you must exercise caution in the use of gas stoves, charcoal grills, and cigarettes. Big Bend has experienced drought conditions in the past several years and some restrictions may apply to the use of these heat sources. Check with a ranger for the latest information about fire safety in the park.


http://www.nps.gov/bibe/visit/safety.htm

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Offline Al

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Interesting
« Reply #40 on: June 30, 2006, 07:41:15 AM »
Must be a brand new permit condition.  Our permits have always prohibited ground and woods fires, but have never contained the prohibition on concerning the High Chisos and zone camping.  Oh, well times change.

Al

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Offline Al

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Long last Post
« Reply #41 on: June 30, 2006, 07:43:45 PM »
If this is going to be the last post in this group for so long, I might as well clean it up since the prior post was before I had my Wheaties this morning.

Must be a brand new permit condition.

Our permits have always prohibited ground and wood fires, but have never contained the referenced prohibition concerning the High Chisos and zone camping. Oh well, times change and not always for the better.  

As best I can tell from this board we are among few hikers, with the exception of TWWG, into the art of heavy weight backpacking.   \:D/

Al

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Offline TheWildWestGuy

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What's in your pack?
« Reply #42 on: June 30, 2006, 09:05:21 PM »
A duralog and turkey pan are a little to much for the TWWG to carry,  I usually have stuff strapped to the back of my pack as it is.  I prefer to have what I call a "Chisos Mtn Campfire"  which is a small candle or two in a rock cradle protected from the wind with a nice big flat rock in the back to reflect the light.   Most often I build this rock cradle to protect my liquid fuel stove (a 1st generation Optimus) from blowing out in the wind.  After dinner it doubles as a nice place to light candles and enjoy the soft light of the candles when the alpenglow from the peaks has faded into darkness and the moon has not yet risen on the horizon.  This is normally around 9 pm depending on season and I enjoy an hour or so of "campfire time" before I blow everything out and hit the sack.   On calm clear nights you can even read by the light of this "campfire"... TWWG

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Offline Al

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Hiking with friends
« Reply #43 on: June 30, 2006, 09:21:22 PM »
We cheat and hike in groups of three or four.  One carries, or I should say, used to carry, the charcoal; one the turkey pan, foil and something else; and another part of a Duralog, not a whole one.  One needs something to start the charcoal if nothing else. Use the foil to bank the fire at the end of the evening and to enclose the ashes and unburned charcoal for transport.  

Back in the old days it used to worked like a champ. :o

Al

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Offline TexasGirl

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What's in your pack?
« Reply #44 on: July 09, 2006, 04:40:20 PM »
No...ahem...trowels in any of your packs?  Call me nosy, naive, what have you....
As a matter of fact, I _do_ have an opinion on that....

 


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