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What do you carry your water in?

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Offline chrissylynn

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What do you carry your water in?
« on: August 07, 2007, 02:09:00 PM »
Still planning my first trip in October, and I'm stocking up little by little on all the gear I may or may not need.  How does one carry two gallons of water on an overnight backpacking trip?  I've seen lots of different hydration packs online, but the most I've seen is 3 liters.  Just wanted to get a few opinions before I head to REI and give them half of next months' mortgage payment for the wrong equipment.  

Also, more of a car camping question, I'm looking for a good folding portable table for food prep/cooking space for family camping trips.  Anyone have one of those coleman kitchen set-ups, or do y'all just use the picnic table for your propane stove?

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Offline RichardM

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What do you carry your water in?
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2007, 02:13:48 PM »
Hydration packs are certainly popular, but don't overlook the cheapskate option:  2-liter soda bottles.  Lightweight, can't get much cheaper, recycleable after your hike.

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Offline bdann

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What do you carry your water in?
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2007, 02:15:08 PM »
Hydration packs are really great.  Just make sure it's stored so that nothing can puncture it.  

Nalgene bottles or knock offs also work well.

I use a folding Coleman table when a picnic table isn't available or just use the tailgate of my truck.
WATER, It does a body good.

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Offline Roy

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What do you carry your water in?
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2007, 02:16:34 PM »
I usually use the tailgate on my truck.  Knew somewone who had one of these and liked it a lot;  looks a little pricey to me.
http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=7587&storeId=226&catalogId=40000000226&langId=-1

2 gallons is a lot to carry;  most people cache water if possible.  I suppose you colud just buy another 3 liter bladder and find some way to stuff it in the pack or hang it somewhere.

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Offline RichardM

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What do you carry your water in?
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2007, 02:19:36 PM »
Quote from: "RichardM"
Hydration packs are certainly popular, but don't overlook the cheapskate option:  2-liter soda bottles.  Lightweight, can't get much cheaper, recycleable after your hike.

I'm having a flashback from a South Rim dayhike years ago.  We came across a solo backpacker who was carrying a gallon jug of water in each hand.  I probably would've at least lashed them to my pack.  :? No reason one couldn't be put inside a pack.

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Offline Buck

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Gallon Method
« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2007, 02:57:16 PM »
I used the 'gallon in each hand' method for a couple of hikes, one to Dog Canyon and the other to Devil's Den, both during summer months.  I believe I counted steps and took a swig every 100 or so - guess I was paranoid about getting dehydrated as it was blazingly hot and sunny.  I had straight H2O in one jug and an electrolyte mix in the other.  I don't think I'll be doing that again.
"Hey, how 'bout a Fandango..?"

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Offline jeffblaylock

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What do you carry your water in?
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2007, 03:54:00 PM »
I use two of these guys, wrapped in my clothing to minimize chances of punctures, plus a 3 liter reservoir, which fits in a sleeve in my backpack, plus a single wide-mouth bottle. Collectively, these carry just short of two gallons. I try to slam at least one liter (but not more than 1 1/2) before leaving the trailhead, so that, in effect, I am "carrying" two gallons.

There's certainly nothing wrong with carrying bottles in your hands, except that you can't use your hands to do anything else (shoo flies, wipe sweat from brow, take photos, operate trekking pole, tighten pack straps, loosen pack straps, remove hat, take off sunglasses before sweat piles up on lens and gets into eye, pet rattlesnake, put hat back on, use limb/root/rock for handhold, etc.)

Also nothing wrong with 2-liter soda bottles, provided you clean them thoroughly. Only downside is they don't collapse as they empty, which is a nice feature of the Platypus bags.

However you do it, try not to put all your water in one container. Most of us here probably have a story about a leaky water container. You don't want to get to your campsite and discover most of your water supply has leaked all over your sleeping bag and out into the air. If there's a total loss of one bottle, at least you have some water left in another. Repair any holes quickly (duct tape holds surprisingly well, provided little pressure is placed on the bottle) and transfer water if a repair won't hold. Or, if you can't transfer it, drink up!
Jeff Blaylock
Austin, Texas

"We'll be back, someday soon. We will return, someday, and when we do the gritty
splendor and the complicated grandeur of Big Bend will still be here. Waiting for us."--Ed Abbey

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Offline chrissylynn

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What do you carry your water in?
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2007, 05:28:17 PM »
Quote from: "Roy"
I usually use the tailgate on my truck.  Knew somewone who had one of these and liked it a lot;  looks a little pricey to me.
http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=7587&storeId=226&catalogId=40000000226&langId=-1

2 gallons is a lot to carry;  most people cache water if possible.  I suppose you colud just buy another 3 liter bladder and find some way to stuff it in the pack or hang it somewhere.


Yeah, I saw that table, not enough space, especially for that price.  We usually travel with 2 or 3 families and I cook for a crowd.  As for the tailgate, well, I travel by minivan unfortunately due to the 3 kiddos in carseats, so no tailgating for a while yet.  (no, they are NOT coming to BIBE, it's a girls-only trip)

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Offline chrissylynn

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What do you carry your water in?
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2007, 05:34:12 PM »
Quote from: "RichardM"
Quote from: "RichardM"
Hydration packs are certainly popular, but don't overlook the cheapskate option:  2-liter soda bottles.  Lightweight, can't get much cheaper, recycleable after your hike.

I'm having a flashback from a South Rim dayhike years ago.  We came across a solo backpacker who was carrying a gallon jug of water in each hand.  I probably would've at least lashed them to my pack.  :? No reason one couldn't be put inside a pack.


Hey, great idea, and right in my price range!   No, I won't be carrying them in my hands.  I don't have a good enough sense of balance or arm strength!   :)

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Offline 01ACRViper

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What do you carry your water in?
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2007, 10:31:32 PM »
i use the knock off nalgenes from Academy. $2.86 for one. the only problem with them is the lid, and a replacement lid from REI is $3.50, so you're  better off getting a new one anyways :lol:

What do you carry your water in?
« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2007, 10:40:26 PM »
Although they are pricey to purchase, I've found that they last a long time, and are extremely durable.

You can get MSR Dromedary bags in a 10L, 6L and 3L size.

You can also attach a MSR hose that has a bite valve on the end

They do not weigh much, and will be much more durable than any of the other alternatives described above.

I usually  like to keep a pint plastic water bottle in my front shirt pocket for ease of access, and to help me measure my water usage.

Good luck!
"No, that did not happen to me.  You have me confused with someone else."

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Online presidio

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What do you carry your water in?
« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2007, 08:17:20 AM »
Quote from: "Boot Canyon 1 Cougar"
You can get MSR Dromedary bags in a 10L, 6L and 3L size.

You can also attach a MSR hose that has a bite valve on the end

They do not weigh much,


But, they still add weight and bulk over simpler methods, plus cost and maintenance requirements. Besides, it is refreshing to actually stop once in a while and take the pack OFF your back while you get a drink.
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<  presidio  >
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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

What do you carry your water in?
« Reply #12 on: August 08, 2007, 12:16:08 PM »
Presidio,

You are absolutely right.  The plastic soda bottles weigh "next to nothing," and the MSR 10L, with hose & bite valve, weighs 10.3 ounces.

I once had the cap pop off of an plastic soda bottle when placed under extreme pressure.  However, usally, the plastic soda bottle is pretty durable.

And the Dromedary Bag can also leak, if the flip up nozzle on the cap "flips up." So I place a piece of "baggie" inside the screw cap of the Dromedary Bag, in case the flip nozzle on the cap flips up.

The Dromedary Bag will pretty much mold to the area it is placed in, unlike the plastic soda bottle.

If I'm going to be in an unforgiving environment, where a loss of water can mean the difference between the two obvious outcomes, I go with the more expensive, slightly heavier and more complicated solution.  But, if water is abundant, I'm quick to save the 10.3 ounces, and leave the Dromedary Bag at home.

And you are so right--taking that pack off when you get a drink sure does make for a better trek, recharge energy, and  improve one's perpective.
"No, that did not happen to me.  You have me confused with someone else."

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Offline Buck

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One alternative to hauling all that water...
« Reply #13 on: August 08, 2007, 01:42:59 PM »
...is just substituting something else in its place.  This was a fun haul in my pack (wrapped up in the middle of my sleeping bag for safe keeping).  It was a bit heavier than 10.3oz, though.  

"Hey, how 'bout a Fandango..?"

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Offline Hayduke

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What do you carry your water in?
« Reply #14 on: August 08, 2007, 07:05:32 PM »
A fellow on one of my trips once placed his pack down for a break. It was loaded to the gills with water, all in Platypuses. Unfortunately he didn't balance his pack very well and it wound up falling into a cactus. Water spewed from his pack as if you had hit it with buckshot. It would have been comical had it not been so serious!

Fortunately I had a few spare drommy bags and we were able to save a good part of his supply.

Because of their tough exterior I've carried drommies for several years now, with an extra 1-quart nalgene for my immediate drinking supply. My only gripe against drommies is that its hard to tell how much water is in a partially filled one.

 


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