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NY Times article on GUMO

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Offline Keepa

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Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #15 on: July 20, 2018, 01:19:30 PM »

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Offline RichardM

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Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #16 on: July 20, 2018, 02:51:33 PM »
Sweet!

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Offline Casa Grande

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Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2018, 09:26:44 PM »
Fake news.  It's 485 miles from Austin, not 500. 

Sent from my Note 8 using Big Bend Chat mobile app


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Offline presidio

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Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2018, 10:28:35 PM »
Fake news.  It's 485 miles from Austin, not 500. 

No, it's just whether you go through Van Horn, or decide to tour Orla on the way in.  :s_laugh:

Most probably have never been through Orla.
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<  presidio  >
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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline Al

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Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #19 on: July 21, 2018, 12:44:13 AM »
I have a fond memory of driving 652 to the park back in the CB radio days.  Heard Guy 1 saying:  "Why are all these people waving at me?  I pulled over to see if I had a low tire and didn't see any problem." 

Guy 2 says, "They're just being friendly." 

Guy 1 says, "Oh."  Guy 1 apparently wasn't from around here.

Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #20 on: July 22, 2018, 10:07:11 PM »
I used to enjoy taking the Orla cutoff, but can't stomach driving 285 any more. Wasn't there a liquor store or something on the state line there, where 652 hits 180?

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Offline presidio

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Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #21 on: July 23, 2018, 12:03:22 AM »
Wasn't there a liquor store or something on the state line there, where 652 hits 180?

There was. It was just south of the state line and almost certainly existed due to some arcane NM liquor law at the time that made it profitable, as there would be no reason at all for it to be there otherwise. It probably was skirting a silly NM licensing issue that severely limited the ability to open a store back in the 70s.

Still, it's doubtful it was a going enterprise as it was 15 miles from  Whites City, 19 miles from Bertha Glover's store at Pine Spring and 32 miles from Carlsbad.

It was a long round trip for a 6 pack and very few people in the area, even now.
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<  presidio  >
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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline wrangler88

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Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #22 on: July 23, 2018, 06:55:54 AM »
I used to enjoy taking the Orla cutoff, but can't stomach driving 285 any more. Wasn't there a liquor store or something on the state line there, where 652 hits 180?

285 is miserable. I drove it once and either came through early enough or times were slower and it was fine. Then after the next 2 or 3 frustrating drives I decided I'll never go that way again. Sometimes, if not pressed for time, I'll drive to Van Horn and take 54. It's a nice drive to me. Just longer. The past 2 trips, I've turned off I20 at Big Spring and drove through Andrews, southern New Mexico, and come down through Carlsbad. Its shorter and a fairly stress free drive.

Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #23 on: July 25, 2018, 07:46:57 PM »
Yeah, straight up 54 is very pleasant. Newly surfaced, and the last 2-3 trips i've seen literally one vehicle per trip on that stretch, until the 62/180 intersection.

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Offline wrangler88

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Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #24 on: July 25, 2018, 10:41:53 PM »
Yeah, straight up 54 is very pleasant. Newly surfaced, and the last 2-3 trips i've seen literally one vehicle per trip on that stretch, until the 62/180 intersection.

I've had the exact same experience. It's just farther of a drive for me.

I'd love to own some land on 54. Some of those ranches seem really neat to me. I'd really love to buy one of the few properties near Pine Springs also. That would be a dream fulfilled!

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Offline presidio

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Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #25 on: July 25, 2018, 11:06:13 PM »
I'd love to own some land on 54. Some of those ranches seem really neat to me. I'd really love to buy one of the few properties near Pine Springs also. That would be a dream fulfilled!

Sometimes, you just have to do it to make it happen.
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<  presidio  >
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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline wrangler88

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Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #26 on: July 26, 2018, 08:07:03 PM »
I'd love to own some land on 54. Some of those ranches seem really neat to me. I'd really love to buy one of the few properties near Pine Springs also. That would be a dream fulfilled!

Sometimes, you just have to do it to make it happen.

I hear you. Just have to get my wife excited about moving out there. She likes the area. Just doesn't want to live there full time.

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Offline presidio

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Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #27 on: July 26, 2018, 09:18:54 PM »
I'd love to own some land on 54. Some of those ranches seem really neat to me. I'd really love to buy one of the few properties near Pine Springs also. That would be a dream fulfilled!

Sometimes, you just have to do it to make it happen.

I hear you. Just have to get my wife excited about moving out there. She likes the area. Just doesn't want to live there full time.

An equally troublesome prospect would be finding someone willing to carve out 10 or 20 acres for you from their 50,000 acre ranch.  However, searching the tax records and cold-writing those in attractive areas could produce results. You never know what someone will or won't do until you ask.
_____________
<  presidio  >
_____________
Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline sleepy

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Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #28 on: July 30, 2018, 05:24:48 PM »
Headed to gumo this weekend for a quick high country ramble with a buddy who's never been.  I'll scout for bears. 
It's never too late to be what you might have been-Geroge Elliot

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Offline dprather

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Re: NY Times article on GUMO
« Reply #29 on: July 30, 2018, 11:15:02 PM »
How many bears are in GUMO?

There are a few present.  They tend to be very shy around people, and visitor sightings are very rare, but they have been photographed by game cameras.  There's never been a bear attack on a human in the park's history.
From a Borderlands Study - It is opined that there is little chance of a returning robust population of black bears in the Guadalupe Mountains.


"Black bears historically inhabited the Davis, Del Norte, Glass,
Santiago, Chinati, Guadalupe, Chisos, and Vieja mountain ranges.
Since that time, black bears in West Texas have all but disappeared
and receded into neighboring mountain ranges in northern Mexico.
However, black bears have been staging a comeback since the
1990s and now have a breeding population in Big Bend National
Park (BBNP).
To better understand if, how, when and where black bears will
return to their historic habitats, we used computer models to evaluate
recolonization scenarios for the Trans-Pecos region.
Using telemetry data from black bears in the BBNP and Black
Gap Wildlife Management area, we used ecological niche modeling
to create a habitat suitability map by identifying habitats
(e.g., elevation, vegetation types) similar to those used by our
radioed bears.
Because suitable habitat occurred in isolated patches (upper elevations
of prominent mountain ranges), we identifed potential
corridors connecting the suitable habitats. We used circuit theory
to analyze resistance and predict the most likely routes that black
bears would move between suitable habitat patches. The most important
corridor identifed for black bears runs from the mountains
in Mexico into the Big Bend. Since Mexico is the source population
for our Texas black bears, this connection is critical to their persistence.
We also identifed corridors linking black bears in Black
Gap Wildlife Management Area, Big Bend National Park and the
Davis Mountains. Based on our analysis and high resistance values,
dispersal between Guadalupe Mountains State Park (the northern
most suitable black bear habitat in the Trans-Pecos) and the Davis
Mountains is unlikely.
We then assessed dispersal scenarios based on black bear population
dynamics. Based on our model, one of the most critical
elements was the presence of female black bears and their ability
to disperse. Although black bears may occur in various mountain
ranges across the Trans-Pecos, most of those sightings have been of
males that typically disperse at much larger distances than females.
Populations are not viable without sustaining reproduction, which
obviously requires litter-producing females.
The importance of female black bears in population recovery
can be best demonstrated with the population in BBNP. In BBNP,
genetic analysis revealed that the recolonization of black bears to
the Chisos Mountains in the 1990s could be tied back to a single
pioneering female black bear. That matriarchal female produced
several litters of cubs (including other females) and was the basis
of the population growth that occurred there."

Interesting Read - Thank You!

Shall we call her Eve?
Leave "quit" at the car.  Embrace the trail as your friend.  Expect to enjoy yourself, and to be amazed.

 


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