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Heading for the south rim May 31st

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Offline RichardM

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Re: Infectious...
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2007, 08:57:37 AM »
Quote from: "SHANEA"
Quote from: "RichardM"
Quote from: "bbbrain"
my mistake.  my brochure "chisos mountains trail map" says feb 1 to july 15

Well, head on over to the Big Bend Bookstore and buy a new one!  Or maybe spring for the Trip Planner package.   :ranger:

Way to go RichardM  =D>  \:D/  you are as bad as I am in getting people to help stimulate the economy and part with their hard earned money!

Of course, it's possible that the bookstore is still selling the "old" maps and hasn't printed new ones with the revised dates.  I also wonder if the SW-1 campsite has been removed from the new maps (if they exist yet).

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Offline jeffblaylock

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Heading for the south rim May 31st
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2007, 09:55:05 AM »
Quote from: "Burn Ban"
in the summer time i'd rather bring it back down with me than desperately need it and not have it


I've never brought any water back down from the Rim. If you feel like you have to ration your water, then you didn't take enough, and that feeling will subtract from your enjoyment of the rim. Getting up for the hike down with a few ounces of water left over is not a fun way to wake up.

I always take a hydration system with me so that I can drink whenever I feel a little thirsty without having to stop hiking. This helps even at the end, when there's only a little water left, until that moment it runs dry about two miles from the trailhead.
Jeff Blaylock
Austin, Texas

"We'll be back, someday soon. We will return, someday, and when we do the gritty
splendor and the complicated grandeur of Big Bend will still be here. Waiting for us."--Ed Abbey

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Offline Casa Grande

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Heading for the south rim May 31st
« Reply #17 on: May 24, 2007, 10:38:55 AM »
Quote from: "jeffblaylock"
Quote from: "Burn Ban"
in the summer time i'd rather bring it back down with me than desperately need it and not have it


I've never brought any water back down from the Rim. If you feel like you have to ration your water, then you didn't take enough, and that feeling will subtract from your enjoyment of the rim. Getting up for the hike down with a few ounces of water left over is not a fun way to wake up.

I always take a hydration system with me so that I can drink whenever I feel a little thirsty without having to stop hiking. This helps even at the end, when there's only a little water left, until that moment it runs dry about two miles from the trailhead.


i'm usually an overpacker and that does include water as well.  I usually have a surplus of water when I hike.  THere is nothing more terrifying than no water and several miles from your destination.  I also make sure I have my water in different bladders or containers.  Having all your eggs in one basket is not a good plan either.  I've been down that road also.  Never again.

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SHANEA

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« Reply #18 on: May 24, 2007, 12:34:59 PM »
Quote from: "Casa Grande"
Quote from: "jeffblaylock"
Quote from: "Burn Ban"
in the summer time i'd rather bring it back down with me than desperately need it and not have it


I've never brought any water back down from the Rim. If you feel like you have to ration your water, then you didn't take enough, and that feeling will subtract from your enjoyment of the rim. Getting up for the hike down with a few ounces of water left over is not a fun way to wake up.

I always take a hydration system with me so that I can drink whenever I feel a little thirsty without having to stop hiking. This helps even at the end, when there's only a little water left, until that moment it runs dry about two miles from the trailhead.


i'm usually an overpacker and that does include water as well.  I usually have a surplus of water when I hike.  THere is nothing more terrifying than no water and several miles from your destination.  I also make sure I have my water in different bladders or containers.  Having all your eggs in one basket is not a good plan either.  I've been down that road also.  Never again.


Kinda like the astronauts running out of oxygen just a few miles from touch down, aw, just hold your breath!

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Offline BIBE FNG

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Heading for the south rim May 31st
« Reply #19 on: May 24, 2007, 01:28:07 PM »
It's virtually impossible to gauge how thirsty you may be and how much water will quench that thirst.  I guess that's why the rule of thumb is a gallon per day plus however much more you can carry.

Last November, I brought 2 gallons on our South Rim overnighter.  I ended up leaving an unopened gallon in the bear box as I knew I had enough to l last until the basin.

Cooler weather (plus the fact I don't sweat much) helped, to be sure.

Like I said, it's difficult to exactly pin-point.  Just think about what you might need - then double that.

And Burn, I do like a shower at the end of a long hike, but not that variety.   :oops:

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Offline bdann

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Heading for the south rim May 31st
« Reply #20 on: May 24, 2007, 02:10:31 PM »
I've only run out of water while hiking in Big Bend once.  It was my first trip to the park.  My brother and I ended up walking all the way back to the Basin from Boot Canyon #4 to refill, then turned around and went right back to our camp in Boot Canyon.   Fun stuff!  Of course back then I didn't know there was a spring in Boot Canyon.   :oops:

My research for that first trip consisted of getting a roadmap, and then finding the park on said roadmap.
WATER, It does a body good.

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Offline stingrey

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Heading for the south rim May 31st
« Reply #21 on: May 24, 2007, 05:15:03 PM »
Sometimes that's the best way to do it though! Just go without plans!
Get busy living, or get busy dying.

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Offline stingrey

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Heading for the south rim May 31st
« Reply #22 on: May 24, 2007, 09:09:58 PM »
Btw, some of the best stuff you can do before going is make sure you are up for a hike to begin with. Comfy shoes/insoles that you've actually used on a longer trail so as to not be surprised with hurting feet when all is said and done, a good amount of water (my 3 liter CamelBak is going to be enough for me, 3.78 liters is a gallon... BUT I'll still take another liter container worth of water just in case), and a good amount of niceties.

Going to be out at night possibly? Take a flashlight with NEW batteries! Maybe take a 2nd light or bulb, and take spare batteries if you think you'll need 'em! Going to be out when bugs will be about? Take some bug repellant! DEFINITELY spring for some hiking socks rather than your two or three year old crop cut Nike socks that you've played basketball in for some time now... I can't tell you how happy you'll be after the hike to not have blisters on your toes...

All in all, be prepared. Local store selling $.99 ponchos and you think you're going during the rainy season/afternoon? Get a couple of those in case. You might not need 'em, but the weight of these things is negligible considering... I personally always hike with a knife, but keep in mind state laws and such. It isn't that I disregard the law, it is that I am out there and I'm fully aware that I am NOT on top of the food chain out there. By the way, I'd never willingly hurt an animal unless it was actively attacking me.

Be sure to be nourished enough to be comfortable, too. Water is great, but you will be burning a ton of calories walking that far. Take something to eat! Make time to eat it. MOST of all, in MY opinion, be absolutely certain to take the best camera you have and know how to use it! You will be pleasantly surprised at all of what you see. You may or may not care to take pictures, but you should make an effort to take some to show other people who otherwise wouldn't visit and/or support the parks to build their interest.

It helps to actively listen to stuff going on around you, too. More often than not I will hear something before I ever see it. Yes, I'll see things without hearing them, and plants don't necessarily make noise, but I've spotted javelina, rabbits, birds, and small reptiles by hearing them first. Yeah, some people could care less about seeing these things... But if you are there in the park, what are you doing walking blindly by the things that make up the park which some people might never see otherwise?

Last but not least, know your route. KNOW that you are on a trail or where your trail ended if you are temporarily off of your trail for whatever reason... In a couple of situations where the trail crosses a creek, you might have trouble picking up on where to go next... Be CERTAIN to know where you came from before you start poking about to find a new trail. In most cases this isn't a problem for the South Rim trail, but at least once I've doubled back because I wanted to be sure that I was on a trail.

Being said, the way dad and I went last time was basically starting out on the left side, completing the loop in a clockwise direction from the lodge... I don't know what that means as I don't have a map in front of me, but that way is the most gentle so they say. Easier climb, coming downhill faster on the way back... Relatively equal as far as I'm concerned in effort going either way, but it depends on how hot it is, how you are at climbing a steady hill versus coming down a hill, etc. I prefer going up... Coming down steep hurts my knees sometimes.

That brings up a question to anyone who made it through this whole thing and cares to answer... The wife and I are very serious about heading out at 3am to try and make sunrise on South Rim... We think that'll give us adequate time to get someplace nice to see the sun rise, but we're going to start out going right and then we'll hit the extended part of the rim after the sun is up and then we'll possibly do some of Emory Peak if we have enough juice left still... Any reason to reconsider our plans, whether it be the early departure time or otherwise? Be aware that we each will be carrying a fully juiced Surefire light of one form or another with a backup and some extra batteries (more than enough runtime for two nights if needed), but we will not take overnight gear. Any insight from anyone on this plan?
Get busy living, or get busy dying.

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Offline RichardM

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Heading for the south rim May 31st
« Reply #23 on: May 24, 2007, 10:52:53 PM »
Quote from: "stingrey"
The wife and I are very serious about heading out at 3am to try and make sunrise on South Rim... We think that'll give us adequate time to get someplace nice to see the sun rise, but we're going to start out going right and then we'll hit the extended part of the rim after the sun is up and then we'll possibly do some of Emory Peak if we have enough juice left still... Any reason to reconsider our plans, whether it be the early departure time or otherwise? Be aware that we each will be carrying a fully juiced Surefire light of one form or another with a backup and some extra batteries (more than enough runtime for two nights if needed), but we will not take overnight gear. Any insight from anyone on this plan?

Pick a night/morning when the moon will be up and you can probably get by without ever turning on your flashlights, at least on the open sections of the trail.  Keep in mind that other folks will be sleeping not too far from the trail, so keep your beams low.  I've always thought it'd be super cool to watch the sunrise from Emory Peak.  Otherwise, you could head out to the Southeast Rim via the Boot Canyon trail and find a good spot.

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Offline stingrey

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Heading for the south rim May 31st
« Reply #24 on: May 25, 2007, 05:02:11 AM »
That is definitely some good advice! We will keep our beams on low unless otherwise required... Emory Peak, huh? Maybe we'll start out on the left side after all then! We'd be making that little branch right around then if we did, just that I figured that would be an easier trek when the sun was already up! :)

I will consider that. On the walking without a light, though, I don't want us to step on a longer reptile on the way, so though we might turn 'em off for a bit, not sure we'll be brave enough to go without! Either way, though, I believe the moon will be most full when we arrive in the park, and we do plan on doing this morning hike towards the beginning of the week. Glad to know that I was thinking the right way on this one! As long as the weather is agreeable, looks like we'll be out bright and early!
Get busy living, or get busy dying.

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Offline badknees

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Heading for the south rim May 31st
« Reply #25 on: May 26, 2007, 12:35:30 PM »
I have never run out of water on a trip to the South Rim. I find that an early start up the LM trail takes about 1/2 L to the Blue Creek overlook, and maybe another 1/2 to make the Rim. From that point on, the amount of water I really seem to need is based on whether or not I want a cup of tea. I usually come back thru Upper Boot canyon and the Pinnacles Trail, and the only place I seem to build any thirst again is on the climb between the cabin and the Emory trail cutoff. Once I make it to the Pinnacle Trail apex, I usually dump any remaining water I have. I usually hike the remaining downhill to the basin without a drink.

All that being said, I don't drink tons of water, and I also start hikes to the Rim early while the LM trail is still in shadow. I like to travel with a light daypack on this kind of hike. Food, water, GPS, camera, portable tripod, flash, extra batteries etc.

Now.... put a heavy pack on me and make me hike in the desert and I probably couldn't carry enough water !!!!!
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SHANEA

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Guzzle...
« Reply #26 on: May 26, 2007, 12:55:02 PM »
Quote from: "badknees"
All that being said, I don't drink tons of water,


On the other hand, I guzzle water and will take whatever you don't need.  I try not to drink liquor too much the night before and as soon as I get up in the morning I start guzzling water to "load up" like a camel.  Hey, I guess that's why they call it a "camel back".    :roll:

 


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