Big Bend Chat

Big Bend National Park Q&A => Hiking the Mountains => Topic started by: aircrftmec on February 12, 2012, 07:29:10 PM

Title: snakes
Post by: aircrftmec on February 12, 2012, 07:29:10 PM
We are heading to Terlingua over spring break to do some off road riding and hiking I noticed the the temps should be in the low 80's during the day and 45 at night. With that being said and winter ending do you think that snakes will be out in full force? Should we be extra cautious this time of year?

TIA
Title: Re: snakes
Post by: The Scorpion on February 12, 2012, 08:49:05 PM
I would not say full force, but im sure they will be out. I have encountered most all of the snakes I have seen right around sunset out on the road to soak up some last minute heat.
Title: Re: snakes
Post by: Voni on February 13, 2012, 07:33:47 AM
Actually, with our mild winter, you should always be aware that snakes could be around.

Below about 60 degrees they don't move very fast . . .
but they still can be around, though usually they'll sense you and get out of the way.

Voni
  sMiling
Title: Re: snakes
Post by: steelfrog on February 13, 2012, 02:41:16 PM
A TP&W guy told me they estimate that due to the drought the snake population is down 80% from levels 2 years ago.  Anyone think this is credible?
Title: Re: snakes
Post by: aircrftmec on February 13, 2012, 06:04:57 PM
A TP&W guy told me they estimate that due to the drought the snake population is down 80% from levels 2 years ago.  Anyone think this is credible?

80% sounds rather high that is a lot of dead snakes :(
Title: Re: snakes
Post by: Juan Cuatro Lados on February 13, 2012, 06:11:07 PM
80% might be underestimating the loss except for places near water,
it's been mighty dry for a long time.
A couple of times have seen black-tailed rattlers moving around in temps in
the 40's.
Also BTW, don't depend on those temperatures (80's and 40's), it
could easily hit 100 in the desert during spring break. 
Hope you enjoy your trip.
Title: Re: snakes
Post by: stingrey on February 14, 2012, 06:57:54 AM
One of the best things you can also do to add another margin of sanity to the whole question is to become familiar with the venomous vs. non-venomous snakes. There ARE snakes in the area, but to know which of the local snakes could cut your visit short (i.e. rattlesnakes, copperhead) may help you put your mind at ease a bit.