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International Park, revisited

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Offline RichardM

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #30 on: June 16, 2010, 10:01:37 PM »

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Offline homerboy2u

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #31 on: June 17, 2010, 04:48:37 PM »
Stay thirsty, my friends.

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Offline RichardM

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #32 on: June 17, 2010, 04:55:38 PM »

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Offline homerboy2u

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #33 on: June 17, 2010, 06:06:14 PM »
Another article:
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=127874281

Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz!!!!!
I didn't say it was a good article! :icon_cool:

 It was never meant at you.........only to the ones with lack of action. :icon_cool:
Stay thirsty, my friends.

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Offline RichardM

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #34 on: July 27, 2010, 10:07:13 PM »
Another article online at http://www.iloveparks.com/
Quote
Obama and Calderon announce plan to recognize Big Bend Rio Bravo

July 28, 2010.  Earlier this year on May 19 when they met in the White House, President Barack Obama and President Felipe Calder?n reaffirmed the strategic partnership between the United States and Mexico and underscored their commitment to improve the lives of all citizens in both our countries, building upon our deep ties, and working with mutual respect and mutual responsibility across a broad arc of issues.

. . .

This historic step represents the first time in nearly 66 years that the Presidents of both countries have publicly supported the original plan to establish a international protected area on the border of the US and Mexico.  The last time was on October 24, 1944 when President Franklin D. Roosevelt wrote a letter to His Excellency General Manual Avila Camacho, President of the United Mexican States stating that "I do not believe that this undertaking in the Big Bend (referring to the establishment of Big Bend National Park on June 12, 1944) will be complete until the entire park area in this region on both sides of the Rio Grande forms one great international park."

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Offline homerboy2u

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #35 on: July 27, 2010, 10:43:24 PM »
Well i'm glad you beat me to the punch. I was going to post from the email i recieved from Rick Lobello, i am still going but, before we get our hopes too high read the full article here:



Quote from: From Rick Lobello's Article:
Sierra del Carmen white-tail , Chisos Basin, Big Bend National Park by Rick LoBello
Obama and Calderon announce plan to recognize Big Bend Rio Bravo    Map of area

July 28, 2010.  Earlier this year on May 19 when they met in the White House, President Barack Obama and President Felipe Calder?n reaffirmed the strategic partnership between the United States and Mexico and underscored their commitment to improve the lives of all citizens in both our countries, building upon our deep ties, and working with mutual respect and mutual responsibility across a broad arc of issues.

The Presidents discussed a wide range of bilateral, hemispheric, and global issues that affect our two countries and reaffirmed the shared values that guide our approaches to economic competitiveness, environmental conservation, clean energy, climate change, nuclear non proliferation, and the safety, social and economic well-being, and security of our citizens.   

In noting the long history of bilateral cooperation in the conservation of natural and cultural resources they recognized that Big Bend National Park and Rio Grande Wild and Scenic River in the United States and the Protected Areas of Maderas del Carmen, Ca?on de Santa Elena, Ocampo, and R?o Bravo del Norte in Mexico together comprise one of the largest and most significant ecological complexes in North America.  In doing so, they recognized that increased cooperation in these protected areas would restrict development and enhance security in the region and within this fragile desert ecosystem.
 
To preserve this region of extraordinary biological diversity, they expressed their support for the United States Department of Interior and the Secretariat of Environment and Natural Resources of the United Mexican States to work through appropriate national processes to recognize and designate Big Bend Rio Bravo as a natural area of binational interest.  The Presidents underscored their commitment to manage the region in a way that enhances security and protects these areas for wildlife preservation, ecosystem restoration, climate change adaptation, wildland fire management, and invasive species control.
 
This historic step represents the first time in nearly 66 years that the Presidents of both countries have publically supported the original plan to establish a international protected area on the border of the US and Mexico.  The last time was on October 24, 1944 when President Franklin D. Roosevelt wrote a letter to His Excellency General Manual Avila Camacho, Presient of the United Mexican States stating that "I do not believe that this undertaking in the Big Bend (referring to the establishment of Big Bend National Park on June 12, 1944) will be complete until the entire park area in this region on both sides of the Rio Grande forms one great international park." 
 
President Camacho responded a month later on November 30 to President Roosevelt's letter stating that he agreed with Roosevelt and how he had instructed the Department of Foreign Relations and that of Agriculture and Formento to pursue as actively as is suitable studies that would lead to the creation of the Mexican Section of the said Park. 
 
Next Steps
 
Negotiations between the two countries at this time are being held behind closed doors.    Stay tuned for more information on important next steps that will need to be taken to see this dream finally come true.  In the meantime contact your representative in Congress in both the House of Representatives and the Senate with phone calls and emails supporting this effort.

Rick LoBello, rickllobello@cs.com
July 28, 2010

 However...... :eusa_think: in his email......
Quote from: Rick Lobello wrote on his email:
I was able to get most of the information from whitehouse.gov. For some reason the Department of the Interior did not put out their own press release. The buck Sierra del Carmen white-tailed deer image was taken on my last trip to the park earlier this month on July 11-12.

 I for one really hope these wheels are turning, still nothing official as of now. Maybe too much hush hush for the time being.... :eusa_pray:
Stay thirsty, my friends.

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Offline Al

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #36 on: July 27, 2010, 10:52:50 PM »
Homero, let's look at this as the glass is half full.  The international park/natural area is still under consideration and to the extent it makes the news, it's a good thing.  Hope springs eternal!

Al

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Offline RichardM

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #37 on: July 28, 2010, 01:17:57 AM »
I for one am pleasantly surprised it's being discussed at all, given the current political climate involved with the border issue.

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Offline homerboy2u

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There is still hope left.
« Reply #38 on: July 28, 2010, 10:48:07 AM »
I was thinking, maybe it would be good idea to bring the newest members of the board up to speed, what this whole idea represents to those of us accused as hopeless romantics.

 This is the video of what the area represents on the Mexican side.... Pristine...Spectacu lar and Captivating.

 This is a .PDF file on El Carmen Project and this is a very interesting article by The NY Times on the issue. All interesting reads.
Stay thirsty, my friends.

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Offline perterra

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #39 on: July 28, 2010, 05:51:30 PM »
I didnt realize there were elk on the Mexican side? Escaped from some where or planted?

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Offline presidio

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #40 on: August 01, 2010, 03:01:03 PM »
I didnt realize there were elk on the Mexican side? Escaped from some where or planted?

How about just being indigenous? Elk are not exclusive to any particular place and are widely found in suitable environments....nat urally.
_____________
<  presidio  >
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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline perterra

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #41 on: August 01, 2010, 03:30:18 PM »
How about just being indigenous? Elk are not exclusive to any particular place and are widely found in suitable environments....nat urally.


Okay I guess, I was just under the impression the only elk indigenous to the southwest regions was Merrymans and it is thought they went extinct in the early 1900's. Thats where my confusion came from. We have elk just south of Dallas as well, in their case they escaped from a breeding operation.

I assumed the ones in the video were Rocky Mountain elk, I guess I was in error. What subspecies inhabit the border along Texas?

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Offline perterra

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #42 on: August 17, 2010, 09:30:33 AM »
I guess I'll answer my own question, it appears from a little reading that elk herds in the border region are part of a herd from North Dakota released into the Guadalupe mountains in the 20's.

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Offline presidio

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #43 on: August 17, 2010, 10:36:16 AM »
See attached article; I think it is safe to say"there are no Elk in Mexico"
http://www.lsonews.com/index2.php?option=com_content&do_pdf=1&id=145

I'm not sure what you think that article states about elk in Mexico. It does not discuss that possibility at all, and is solely concerned with Texas.

However, this article http://www.jstor.org/pss/3784478 is a bit more definitive and it would appear there is no record of elk in Mexico.
_____________
<  presidio  >
_____________
Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline homerboy2u

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Re: International Park, revisited
« Reply #44 on: August 17, 2010, 11:42:18 AM »
I guess I'll answer my own question, it appears from a little reading that elk herds in the border region are part of a herd from North Dakota released into the Guadalupe mountains in the 20's.

 Contrary to the initial comments and given this discussion  applies to the International Park Initiative. Elks have inhabited Mexico for the past 20,000 years, according to the evidence depicted in  petroglyph's on different granite walls of, in this case in the Sierra del Burro Range,Sierra Madre Valle Colombia, Sierra Maderas del Carmen. This is pertaining to the State of Coahuila (Mexico) alone.

 Now, there are more references other than just what i am saying here.
My strongest argument would be to read the Book THE CALL OF THE MOUNTAINS,
EL BURRO, EL CARMEN AND CHISOS
(scroll down until you see the book cover)....EL LLAMADO DE LAS MONTA?AS by Patricio Roblesgil.


ISBN   968639785X, 9789686397857

 In it, you will see many photographs of Wapiti , as they are called in Mexico, the story behind the wapiti in the Burro Range, how they were hunted down in to extintion back in the 1920's and it's reintroduction by ranch owners in the previous mountain areas mentioned to it's current success rate.

 Cemex has a continuous operation breeding ground for the Carmen Mountain Wapiti in the Rancho Pilares area, it's preparations,infrastructure investments, Frustrations in other breeding programs and how those missteps were avoided in the implementation of this program. So many facts,pictures and plans for the near and long term future.

 An excellent read..
Stay thirsty, my friends.

 


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