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Removal of Non-Native Wildlife

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Offline RichardM

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Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« on: September 10, 2018, 10:30:34 AM »
Big Bend National Park Given Go-Ahead To Remove Non-Native Wildlife
By NPT Staff on June 26th, 2018

While they realize they won't remove all exotic wildlife from the park, Big Bend National Park staff have been given permission to move ahead with a plan to remove as many feral hogs and Aoudad sheep as possible.

Staff will use by live-trapping and lethal means to reduce the populations of the two species that have moved into Big Bend from the surrounding landscape.

Aoudad have been in the park for the past three decades, and have increased significantly in recent years. Estimates suggest 200 to 400 Aoudads now inhabit the park. Aoudads are major competitors to native desert bighorn sheep. Feral hogs are present in low numbers in the park’s northern extremity, and are expected to invade the heavily vegetated, 113-mile Rio Grande corridor in coming years. Additionally, the park wishes to prevent feral hogs from invading the Chisos Mountains, a small range within the park that contains rare montane woodlands and hosts endangered, rare and isolated native species.

According to staff estimates, upwards of 75 percent of the non-native animals can be removed from the park. This in turn means that about 157,000 pounds of vegetation will be eaten each year by the two populations, "instead of the currently estimated 628,000 pounds."

“These invasive animals threaten the native plants and animals the park is mandated to protect,” said Big Bend's acting Superintendent, Tom Forsyth. “This plan provides the framework to manage them, while minimizing the effects on park visitors. This plan will aid park management as we steward these resources for future generations.”

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Offline dprather

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2018, 12:01:43 PM »
Silly as I am, I see an easy, effective, and cost-effective method for reducing hog and sheep numbers.  Some people do this for fun.  They are called hunters.

Designate hunting areas.
Develop some kind of application lottery (it is done on federal lands everywhere).  Some include fees.
Turn the hunters loose for one year.
Evaluate results. 

Leave "quit" at the car.  Embrace the trail as your friend.  Expect to enjoy yourself, and to be amazed.

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Offline badknees

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2018, 12:16:07 PM »
Quote
Staff will use by live-trapping and lethal means

1. Lethal means - Shooting aoudad
2. Live trapping - Catching feral hogs (and then probably using #1 -  lethal means)

FYI - https://articles.extension.org/pages/63661/feral-hog-transportation-regulations-in-texas
Not all those who wander are lost.
– J.R.R. Tolkien

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Offline ggowins

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2018, 12:52:04 PM »
Some of the counties here in central Texas were offering bounties for bringing in proof of a wild hog kill as a way to control them.

http://www.feralhogtaskforce.com/hays.html

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Offline iCe

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2018, 06:00:11 PM »
Some of the counties here in central Texas were offering bounties for bringing in proof of a wild hog kill as a way to control them.

http://www.feralhogtaskforce.com/hays.html


We just "choot-em" over here. I saw one on the way to work today. It was munching grass next to a pond in someone's front yard. 1st thought- dang...I wish I had my rifle. 2nd thought - I hope the owner sees me driving by before he shoots

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Offline dprather

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2018, 06:46:27 PM »
Living in Deep East Texas, I am puzzled by the FEDS here and their rules.  We are overrun with hogs.  Still, the rules for hunting on Federal land prevent using the kind of firearms that one wold most want to use for hog hunting. 

I have left literal herds of hogs pass instead of taking a risk with a black-powder (single-shot) rifle. 

If they really want to reduce hog numbers, they ought to turn us loose and let us do what we know how to do.

There are Federal tracts in East Texas that are barely touched by hunters and not used at all in other recreational ways, so the issue cannot be safety.

It is as if the FEDS want to reduce hog numbers abut are afraid to actually let hunters hunt.
Leave "quit" at the car.  Embrace the trail as your friend.  Expect to enjoy yourself, and to be amazed.

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Offline Imre

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2018, 08:45:53 PM »
I believe that anytime the federal government wants to reduce exotic invaders, whether auodad or feral hogs, there is tremendous pushback from PETA and like minded organizations.
For every complex problem there is a solution that is simple, obvious, and wrong.
- H.L. Mencken

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Offline ggowins

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2018, 09:41:37 PM »
I'm a lifetime member of PETA.   People Eating Tasty Animals

We have a group of Axis deer in the area.  I think they know they are safe in our neighborhood, because we aren't allowed to hunt.  But on the other side of the fence is an 1800 acre ranch that is hunted on year round. 

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Offline iCe

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2018, 09:44:48 PM »
I'm a lifetime member of PETA.   People Eating Tasty Animals

We have a group of Axis deer in the area.  I think they know they are safe in our neighborhood, because we aren't allowed to hunt.  But on the other side of the fence is an 1800 acre ranch that is hunted on year round.


Bow hunting is quiet (so are suppressors but that's a whole new expense level). Axis is very tasty.

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Offline ggowins

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2018, 10:00:01 PM »
Bow hunting is quiet (so are suppressors but that's a whole new expense level). Axis is very tasty.

Believe me, I've been tempted every time a moonless night comes around.  But with my luck the deer wouldn't drop immediately and run off to die on the back porch of a neighbor's house with little kids.  HOA would probably frown on that.   :icon_biggrin:

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Online presidio

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2018, 11:10:38 PM »
Silly as I am, I see an easy, effective, and cost-effective method for reducing hog and sheep numbers.  Some people do this for fun.  They are called hunters.

Designate hunting areas.
Develop some kind of application lottery (it is done on federal lands everywhere).  Some include fees.
Turn the hunters loose for one year.
Evaluate results.

Ain't gonna happen in an NPS area. That would mean letting the public perform a public service with little to no supervision. Can't let that occur.

The NPS would use the excuse that hunters couldn't possibly be trusted to only take out the exotics.

The NPS and sycophant support groups have nightmares about dire horrors anytime proposals advocate letting the public use guns in a park, for any reason. The fact that these events never, ever come to pass is irrelevant.

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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline Hang10er

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2018, 06:59:39 AM »
I think the State of Texas has been very effective in offering hunts to control both native and non-native wildlife.  If you look online, the "lottery" is open right now to apply and hunt on State owned lands (State Parks, Wildlife Management Areas, etc.).  It serves a multitude of purposes.  As you probably know, hunting, especially deer hunting, is a very big business in Texas and that translates to expensive.  I grew up hunting but basically had to give it up because I don't have a "connection" with someone who has a good, reasonable lease.  I just can't justify paying the money when I have college and other family expenses.

The program generates revenue.  The application fees are reasonable but you can see how many people applied last year and for every category, every location there are TONS of people applying.  Those fees add up. If you get chosen to hunt, you have to purchase a hunting license.  The money generated by hunters buying licenses raises more money for conservation and protection of our State's wildlife than anything PETA or other animal loving groups raise!  You also have to pay a fee when you get picked and any applicable camping fees if you chose to camp at the location.

If you browse the selections you can enter to hunt native animals like White tail deer, turkey, alligator, etc.  Most of the hunts allow you to not only bag what you entered the drawing for but also any "exotics" you may come across.  They also have hunts for hogs and other invasive species. 

I thinks the NPS could adopt a similar program and get a handle on the problem now before it grows worse.  The only down side I see is that the State of Texas will often close the parks to visitors on dates they have hunts. 

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Offline rocketman

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2018, 07:19:39 PM »
I'm with Presidio on this one. No way the NPS will sponsor or allow private citizens with guns, gleefully shooting them at whatever they want while swilling cheap beer and leaving trash all over the place.
Making ice cubes FROM THE SUN!!!

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Offline iCe

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2018, 07:22:53 PM »
Unless it finally changed, Grand Teton NP has Elk Hunts every year. I think it's the only NP that allows hunting.

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Online presidio

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Re: Removal of Non-Native Wildlife
« Reply #14 on: September 11, 2018, 08:19:15 PM »
Unless it finally changed, Grand Teton NP has Elk Hunts every year. I think it's the only NP that allows hunting.

I haven't looked, but I'm fairly certain one or more Alaska parks allow at least subsistence hunting by indigenous groups.

If so, that is a bit different than the kind of hunting most are familiar with.
_____________
<  presidio  >
_____________
Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

 


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