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Rocky Mountain National Park

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Offline jeffblaylock

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #15 on: July 20, 2009, 12:10:28 AM »
Great trip report and pics so far, Jeff.  

I know what you mean about crowds and some of the strange/stupid things people do.  Seems like every trip I take at the Grand Canyon I dread the first mile or 2 of the corridor trails as they are usually clogged with tourons.  Most seem to enjoy screaming at the top of their lungs to listen for a echo.  The canyon is too open for anything like an echo to ever reverberate back.

You still using the Canon G9?  I still don't think I've mastered all the various settings on mine yet.

Make no mistake. During summer, RMNP is an "industrial" national park with huge crowds. I was amused at a bunch of tourists parked every which way along the Bear Lake road clamoring for views. "Bear," I thought. Nope. Elk. There are elk everywhere. This traffic jam nonetheless took 15 minutes to get around.

Oh well. There are certainly quieter places out there, both in the NPS system and especially out. This is not a hook for NPS critics, just a nod that, yes, there is another world beyond the NPS and its experiences are wilder. Probably the worst industrial tourist experience I had was in Yellowstone a few years ago. I left two days early because I'd had it with the people. I went to Canyonlands, in the Needles District, and had the place to myself. Ironically, I am scheduled to pass through Yellowstone later this summer ... on a Saturday. I never learn.

Yes, still shooting with a G9. Wish its wide angle lens was wider but otherwise have no complaints with it. OK, I have one other. Why the hell did they put the HI ISO setting next to 80, as opposed to, I dunno, 1600? Every now and then, I'll discover I've taken the last several shots not at ISO 80 but in fact at ISO 800, 1600, 3200 .... despite it being broad daylight. Nonetheless, this is definitely still my backpacking camera of choice, as an SLR would weigh 4 to 10 times as much with all the trappings.

Homero, I was not only wearing fleece but also wearing goose down. It got down to 36 F one morning, or about 2 to you folks south of the border (and pretty much anywhere other than this country).
« Last Edit: July 20, 2009, 12:12:15 AM by jeffblaylock »
Jeff Blaylock
Austin, Texas

"We'll be back, someday soon. We will return, someday, and when we do the gritty
splendor and the complicated grandeur of Big Bend will still be here. Waiting for us."--Ed Abbey

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Offline jeffblaylock

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #16 on: July 20, 2009, 01:11:52 AM »
BTW, this photo from RMNP, of Mills Lake in beautiful Glacier Gorge, has the luck of being the 2,000th photo I've posted to my web site.



The trip report will continue this week.
Jeff Blaylock
Austin, Texas

"We'll be back, someday soon. We will return, someday, and when we do the gritty
splendor and the complicated grandeur of Big Bend will still be here. Waiting for us."--Ed Abbey

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Offline randell

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2009, 11:42:47 AM »
Awesome photos, Jeff!  Since I have started planning my trip to Colorado I have found out that both you and muse have made recent trips.  Nice to have all this info to consider when planning my first trip to Colorado.
There's nothing like a good quest to get you intimate with a place. - Tom Clynes

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Offline dkerr24

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2009, 12:03:11 PM »
Awesome photos, Jeff!  Since I have started planning my trip to Colorado I have found out that both you and muse have made recent trips.  Nice to have all this info to consider when planning my first trip to Colorado.

Another area of Colo that you can spend an entire vacation exploring is SW Colo.  The area around Silverton/Ouray/Durango will give you the complete experience from alpine meadows to desert buttes.  And definitely bring the fleece, even in mid-summer! :)

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Offline Al

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2009, 12:46:02 PM »
Awesome photos, Jeff!  Since I have started planning my trip to Colorado I have found out that both you and muse have made recent trips.  Nice to have all this info to consider when planning my first trip to Colorado.

Another area of Colo that you can spend an entire vacation exploring is SW Colo.  The area around Silverton/Ouray/Durango will give you the complete experience from alpine meadows to desert buttes.  And definitely bring the fleece, even in mid-summer! :)

I second dkerr's opinion.

Al

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Offline dkerr24

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #20 on: July 20, 2009, 01:44:14 PM »
Sorry Jeff, no intention to stray off the topic here.

I have not visited your website in a few months; wow, you've added a lot of content!

Congratulations on photo #2000 on your site.

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Offline Goldilocks

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #21 on: July 20, 2009, 09:02:24 PM »
Beautiful as always, Jeff.  What a wonderful trip!

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Offline Lorax

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #22 on: July 21, 2009, 10:15:32 PM »
Thanks for all the beautiful pictures.

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Offline mountaindocdanny

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #23 on: July 22, 2009, 01:14:04 PM »
Jeff,

I've enjoyed the pictures. Rocky is a great place, but to date I have not been brave enough to go during the summer. Off season has always been our time to visit. I enjoyed the picture of Cub Lake. We backpacked up there with the kids in May of last year and found it a bit more "wintery".



I'm glad you enjoyed your trip. It is a special place to my family.

-Danny

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Offline jeffblaylock

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #24 on: July 22, 2009, 10:15:47 PM »
Thanks for the comments, everyone. Danny, bet the place is a real wonderland when there's snow everywhere, as opposed to some patches. But what a patch I found!

I awoke to a chilly morning with the sun lighting up the yellow rainfly of my tent. The thermometer Iíd placed on the picnic table said it was 36 degrees. I didnít linger in camp for long on my last full day at Rocky Mountain National Park, because it was going to be a long one. The plan was get an early start and park at the Glacier Gorge trailhead, then take a shuttle to Bear Lake trailhead and hike back. However, I didnít get an early enough start, so the tiny parking lot at Glacier Gorge was already full. Fortunately, the lot at Bear Lake was not, else I would have to retreat to the Visitor Center. By the time I started hiking toward Bear Lake, it was almost 9 a.m., and the sun was high in the deep blue sky.

Todayís looping agenda would now begin with a leisurely stroll around Bear Lake (9,475′), followed by a hike up Tyndall Gorge past Nymph Lake (9,700′) to Dream Lake (9,900′) and on to Emerald Lake (10,100′), the highest alpine lake in this gorge. Backtracking to Dream Lake, Iíd take a trail which cuts over the ridge dividing Tyndall Gorge from Chaos Canyon, and on to Lake Haiyaha (10,220′), where I was likely to encounter snowdrifts. They hopefully would not prove impassible, as I would have to backtrack to Bear Lake. If I could get past Lake Haiyaha, I would hike between the Glacier Knobs into Loch Vale. In that gorge, I would visit The Loch (10,180′) and hike up a likely snow-covered slope to Timberline Falls (10,480′) and hopefully Glass Lake (10,820′) and Sky Pond (10,900′) beyond. Backtracking to The Loch, Iíd then head into Glacier Gorge to visit Mills Lake (9,940′) before passing Alberta Falls (9,400′) on my way to the Glacier Gorge (9,180′) trailhead and a shuttle back to where I parked (9,450′).



The trail around pretty Bear Lake is mostly level and mostly handicapped accessible (save one stretch on the southwest shore thatís pretty steep). Because of its proximity to a major trailhead parking area, it is probably one of the most visited lakes in the park. Walking counter-clockwise from the trailhead, the first impressive sight is the sheer north face of Hallett Peak above a tree-lined shore. Continuing around, views across the lake include Longs Peak, the highest summit in the park, and Glacier Gorge, pictured above. The Glacier Knobs are two lowish mounds of granite peeking over the trees. The bare rock slope of Thatchtop is the prominent peak in the middle of the frame. Behind it is the Continental Divide.

Back at the trailhead, I started up the trail continuing into the higher reaches of Tyndall Gorge. The first stop was a little lake situated among the trees on a bubble of rock. Nymph Lake is better seen from a rock outcrop above it on the climb toward Dream Lake, which also happens to provide a sensational view of Glacier Gorge and Longs Peak.



Down the left side of Glacier Gorge is Half Mountain, which looks like half of it is missing; Storm Peak, the snow covered top of which sits just below the highest peak in the ridge; Longs Peak; the serrated Keyboard of the Winds; and, finally, aptly named Pagoda Mountain. The gorgeís right side, as seen from this point, is dominated by Thatchtop. The twin Glacier Knobs are in the foreground. Glacier Gorge would be an eventual destination, but now it was time to turn away from this stunning view and hike up to Dream Lake, which was just up the trail and another 50 feet in elevation higher.

Dream Lake does indeed to appear as if in a dream. Judging from all the hikers hanging out on its rocky shore, it appears that many like to dream about such places.
Sitting in this deep chasm, Dream Lake runs about a quarter mile long on a nearly east-west line. The mighty Hallett Peakís sheer north face towers over its dark waters. The lake hugs the jagged cliffs of Flattop Mountain, a relatively easily climbed peak, thanks to its sloping north face. I knew Iíd return to Dream Lakeís shores, so I left them momentarily to find the even more beautiful Emerald Lake.



This alpine gem sits in a dramatic amphitheater of sheer rock faces and steep talus slopes tumbling down from the craggy ramparts of Flattop Mountain and the imposing cliffs of Hallett Peak. Lingering snow filled and criss-crossed the gullies as if painted in place, and green trees reached toward a deep blue sky. This was as close as I would get to Hallett Peak, which had been a frequently seen mountain during this brief trip. It didnít quite get me close enough to see a long waterfall tumbling down the hillside, hidden in the picture above by the scree slope.

The trail ended here. Any further exploration required a walk across snow-covered talus, so, after about 10 minutes of looking at the scenery, I retreated back to Dream Lake. The round-trip from Dream to Emerald Lake and back had taken less than 35 minutes, and barely 90 minutes from the Bear Lake trailhead. From the east side of Dream Lake, I took a steeply rising trail, crossed a brief snow patch, and quickly gained more than 300 feet to a saddle ridge separating Tyndall Gorge from Chaos Canyon. The ridge offered good views back down toward Nymph and Bear Lakes, and up to Glacier Gorge. The trail returned quickly to the forest, and soon it met a spur trail headed to Lake Haiyaha.

I took this trail to the snow-covered jumble of rocks and downed trees at the lakeís outlet. As this was not a priority lake, I did not take the time to clamber over the rocks to get a better view. Instead, I descended from this high canyon through the forest, past an unnamed pond, heading steadily downward between the Glacier Knobs into Loch Vale, a 2-mile long gorge between Thatchtop, Taylor and Otis Peaks. The trail quickly gains elevation, switchbacking up the side of the western Glacier Knob until it reaches The Loch, one of the most popular hiking destinations in the park.



The trail winds along The Lochís northern shore, providing access to a series of rock outcrops and shelves above, and entering, the lake. From any of them, views of Thatchtop and on up the gorge to Taylor Peak and its namesake glacier inspire the soul. I lingered for about 45 minutes on one set of rocks jutting out into the lake, providing an excellent view of the north face of Thatchtop and the snowfields kissing the water.

The journey higher up Loch Vale crossed alternatively muddy and snowy patches. The higher I climbed, the snowier it got. I was very happy with my gaiter purchase a few days earlier, as they saved my feet from the snow. The final 300 yards or so to Timberline Falls required a traverse of a steep, slushy snowfield that proved to be quite treacherous. As the sun blazed down, it weakened the snow pack, and meltwater rushing beneath it eroded it unseen from below. I postholed only a couple of times, but both caused me to lose my balance. It took me about 20 minutes to cross the snowfield and reach the falls, still cloaked in winterís chill.



The best view of the falls required a tricky boulder hop across an ice-cold stream, which I declined to do. I also passed on the climb up one snow-covered side ó brief though it would be ó to reach the higher lakes, which I presumed were snow-bound. So, after spending about 15 minutes at the falls, I turned back and saw the true steepness of that snowfield I had just crossed.



It took me almost half an hour to get back across this obstacle. The footing had become more treacherous in a very short time, in part because the person crossing in front of me, visible in the lower center of the photo, slid on her behind most of the way down, smoothing out the previous hikersí bootprints. So I found myself creating new footholds. At one point, I slid downhill about 20 yards, self arresting before reaching the bottom of the snowfield. There was no danger here; it just forced me to climb back up to get off the slope.

Back on terra firma, wet and muddy as it was, I headed back down to The Loch. Timberline Falls appears as a vertical ribbon of water just below an oval gray patch between the tops of the trees and the lowest point of the headwall. Taylor Glacier is the prominent snowfield up and to the right of the falls.



Clouds had begun building, though the wind pattern suggested a storm was not coming. Nonetheless, I did not stay long to admire the views as I still had another lake to visit and another 4.3 miles to hike.

Near where I had entered the Loch, a trail split off to the southeast into Glacier Gorge, a 3.5-mile U-shaped valley repeatedly carved by glaciers and home to nine lakes. I would only make it to the first one, as the second one is little more than a bog and itís another 2.5 miles to the third one. The trail crosses the creek on a footbridge, then climbs a little over 100 feet passed pretty but inconspicuous Glacier Falls to one of Rocky Mountain National Parkís jewels.



Featured as photo No. 2,000, Mills Lake offers incredible views of the peaks lining this impressive valley. Another solo hiker and I shared the rock shelf overlooking the lake and this view, and I ate another protein bar while we chatted. At first, the mosquitoes were aggressive, but they quickly left the scene as the winds picked up, the temperatures cooled, and the sun vanished behind some dark clouds. A storm seemed to be coming, so I left this splendid lake after only about 20 minutes of rest.

The storm never came. It evidently did not have enough energy to get over the Continental Divide, but it remained cloudy and breezy for the rest of the afternoon. It took me about an hour to hike down from Mills Lake, hang a right on the Loch Vale Trail, scoot around the eastern Glacier Knob, and descend another 400 feet or so to Alberta Falls, one of the parkís most visited features.



Glacier Creek thunders over a rocky ledge, falling about 25 feet in a frothy spray, then tumbles around a jumble of soaked boulders. The sun briefly broke through the clouds and created a rainbow in the spray, but my photos of it had too busy of a background. A social trail up the right side leads to the brink of the falls. Thatís Half Mountain peering above the pines.

After about 15 minutes of enjoying the waterfall, I started down the trail toward the Glacier Gorge trailhead, which was about three quarters of a mile away, to catch a shuttle bus back to Bear Lake. Within 15 minutes, I reached a junction. The trail to the right led to Glacier Gorge in about 0.4 mile. The trail to the left led to Bear Lake in 0.6 miles. So much for the shuttle plan. In 12 minutes, after gaining a little over 200 feet, I was back at Bear Lake, and quickly returned to my rental car. I covered about 13.5 miles, and now it was time for a good meal.

I drove back into Estes Park and ate at the Wapiti Restaurant & Pub, where I sat on the outdoor patio with a great view of the clouds lit pink and orange by the setting sun. I had the wapiti (thatís elk) tenderloin, baked potato, salad, and a couple of Staggering Elk Lagers. It was an elk-themed evening.

Returning to my campsite for one final night, I arranged what was left of the wood into a pyre, having soaked the duff and kindling with lighter fluid first, knowing I would not be up late. The obnoxious kids on a nearby loop were gone, but the tent pad next door was now home to a family with two kids who were constantly being shushed by their mother. I tried to ignore them, but it became difficult when the older kid ó probably around 5 ó stumbled, falling face first into their fire ring. Her burns were minor, but she was quite scared. Later, as my fire suddenly lost its energy, I added some additional lighter fluid. The guy next door lectured me about that, to which I pointed out that I wasnít the one whose kid was allowed to fall into the campfire. That was the end of that conversation.

The beautiful stars of the last couple of nights were gone, shrouded by the clouds. Much later, they returned, with planet Jupiter being especially dazzling in an otherwise empty stretch of sky (Capricorn). It wasnít as cold as the previous night, but it was still in the 40s, and that was fine by me.
« Last Edit: July 22, 2009, 10:55:33 PM by jeffblaylock »
Jeff Blaylock
Austin, Texas

"We'll be back, someday soon. We will return, someday, and when we do the gritty
splendor and the complicated grandeur of Big Bend will still be here. Waiting for us."--Ed Abbey

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Offline mountaindocdanny

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2009, 09:50:57 PM »
Jeff,

I loved the pictures of the Bear Lake area. This is one of my favorite places for overnight snowshoe trips. Over the years I've taken four overnight snowshoes into the area. In winter there is self registration and empty backcountry. During the day there will be some other folks out, but at night it empties. I've posted a few pics of some the lakes in the winter. I apologize for the low quality scans.



Dream Lake



Mills Lake



The Loch

Last fall my wife and I tried to get a walk up permit for this area, but had to head up to Spruce Lake instead (just west of your great photograph of Fern Lake). Here's a pic of Fern Falls with the much less dramatic flow of the fall.



Keep the pics coming Jeff. They sure offer a welcome respite from a Texas summer.

-Danny

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Offline woodrow

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #26 on: July 24, 2009, 06:38:49 PM »
You should write a book Dude !!  I love reading about your adventures !!

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Offline jeffblaylock

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #27 on: July 24, 2009, 10:30:28 PM »
You should write a book Dude !!  I love reading about your adventures !!

Thanks Woodrow! One last chapter in this adventure:

My last day in Colorado began as a brilliantly sunny, breezy morning. I packed up my campsite ó packing my big rolling duffel bag in the process ó and left the Moraine Park campground for the last time. My immediate goal was driving Trail Ridge Road, the scenic highway which crosses the park, much of it above treeline. I had driven the road as far as Many Parks Curve earlier in the visit and had made it as far west as the Continental Divide in 1998. This would be my first time to go all the way to Grand Lake.

There were lots of cars parked alongside the road approaching the Forest Canyon overlook, and for great reasons. A half dozen photogenic elk were grazing on the tundra with snow-capped peaks as an impressive backdrop. I opted not to park on the tundra and instead pulled into the viewpoint parking lot, then hiked down the hill to the elk. Using othersí cars as screens, I was able to get some terrific photos of these magnificent creatures. Another pair of elk were grazing above the road, and I was able to get some photos of them through the stream of cars crawling by the crowds. The wind was quite chilly, and the walk back to my car was longer that it had first seemed. The pretty mountain views kept my mind off the chill.



A short trail leads from the parking area to a series of viewing platforms along the tundra, providing sweeping views of Forest Canyon and the mountains lining it, from Longs Peak to Terrah Tomah Mountain. Marmots were playing on the sun-warmed rocks scattered across the tundra, chasing each other and wrestling to the delight of the assembled human spectators.



From Forest Canyon overlook, Trail Ridge Road continues to climb in long, looping switchbacks until it reaches Rock Cut at 12,090 feet. A trailhead from this parking area provides access to the tundra, which I hoped would have lots of wildflowers. As it stood, there were a few. I was either too early in the season or too late. I got particularly good photo of the mountains behind some yellow blooms. The trail heads more or less straight uphill to a high point along Trail Ridge offering nearly 360-degree views of the surrounding tundra and high peaks. Interesting rock formations line the trail. The wind was gusting at the top.



Back in the car, I headed over the roadís highpoint (12,183 feet) and down to the Alpine Visitor Center near Fall River Pass (11,796 feet). I parked underneath a snowbank several feet above the carís top. The snack shop inside had just brewed some ice tea, so I got me a big glass while I wandered the gift shop, getting myself a cap. The back deck offered great views of the snow-covered north side of Trail Ridge. Across the road, a viewpoint offers splendid views of the Gore Range.



The aptly named Mount Cumulus is identifiable by the large unbroken snowfield covering its summit, visible just to the right of center, directly under the clouds. To the right, the peaks Howard Mountain and Mount Cirrus appear as the horns of a saddle on the right edge of the frame. To the left of Mount Cumulus (going leftward) are Mount Nimbus, Mount Stratus, and Baker Mountain near the photoís left edge. Trail Ridge Road quickly descends from this point and travels down the tree-lined canyon beneath these peaks.

I drove down to the Continental Divide and stopped at the Lake Irene picnic area. A short stroll from there takes one to the shoreline of pretty little Lake Irene. Surrounded as it is by tall pines, the trail does not offer much in the way of views. The trail ends at a viewpoint which can be skipped.

The road continued its rapid descent, and thatís when my heart was practically broken. Most of the pine trees along the Colorado Riverís headwaters were dead, victims of a boring beetle epidemic. The Timber Creek campground was completely devastated. A construction crew was clearing out all the dead trees, leaving a handful of sickly pines to stand above the torn up ground. It looked like a strip mall construction site. Where trees stood, they were brown and dead. Road construction slowed my progress, giving me ample opportunities to observe the destruction.

Conditions were better near Grand Lake. I drove around the lake to reach the West Portal, trailhead to the popular Adams Falls. There were several school buses parked among the dozens of vehicles there. This hike would have lots of company, and, indeed, the area around the falls was packed. Fortunately, I was able to find a viewpoint, in the direct spray of the falls, from which to take a person-free photo.



The falls thunder down a narrow chute in the rocks before taking a hard right turn to continue down a narrow gorge. This is the upper portion of the falls, before it makes that turn. The jagged edge of black rock on the left side of the frame is actually in the foreground; thereís a crowded viewing platform on top of it. About 20 feet below the bottom of the frame, the falls make that hard right turn, passing invisibly underneath where I was standing. The hike was pleasant, but I was officially hungry, and so I left Rocky Mountain National Park behind to return to civilization.

In the town of Grand Lake, I parked along the main square and sought out a place for lunch. As luck would have it, none appeared to be situated on the lake itself. I ended up at Max & Tís Bar and Grill, where I sat at the outside bar and chatted with Max. I had a beef au jus sandwich and fries which were quite tasty. I also stopped for ice cream at the crowded Grand Lake Chocolates, which has a mural of some rather creepy looking children painted on the wall. I sat on a bench on the townís boardwalk to study the road atlas. I decided to head for Mount Evans on the highest paved road in North America. I was getting a late start, so I was risking getting caught in some bad weather.



The 14-mile Mount Evans Highway is a white-knuckler. The curves are sharp, blind, and exposed. It reminded me of all those mountain roads I drove in the San Juans back in 2003, except that this one was paved, and had more cars on it. At the top, a parking area sits at 14,130 feet beneath an observatory and the stone ruins of an old restaurant and souvenir shop. Rain was streaming down from some of the clouds. Or, snow actually.



I climbed up a portion of the trail to the summit, until it reached a steep icy stretch. My hiking boots were already packed, and I was already slipping on the level parts, and it was already starting to snow. So I turned back, and admired the view across a sea of mountains and clouds.



The drive down was pretty much as white-knuckling as the way up the mountain, particularly the stretch between the summit and Summit Lake. Along the way, I spied a mountain goat using a roadway marker to scratch his head. The stretch of road around the lake area had buckled, creating a series of speed bumps and cracks. The lake itself sits in a steep-sided head of Chicago Basin to the northeast of a line of a peaks, creating an environment more like the Arctic Circle than the Rocky Mountains. A short trail heads across the permafrost to the lakeís edge, situated at 12,830 feet of elevation.

Much of the lake was still frozen over. Its mirror-still waters reflected the snowy ridge between Mount Evans and Mount Spalding. At several times in its history, this basin sat beneath 1,000-foot deep glacier.



Continuing the drive back down the mountain, I stopped briefly at Echo Lake and watched another family of ducks swimming in its cold waters. The summit of Mount Evans was shrouded by clouds. From there, I drove east toward Denver on a highway following a ridge of mountains northeast of Mount Evans, stopping briefly at a picnic area overlooking the forested canyon beneath Warrior Mountain.

The side-trip to Mount Evans got me into Denver after the traffic had died down. My Australian-accented GPS guided me to the hotel a few miles from the airport. I ate at the restaurant there, enjoying a buffalo filet mignon and an ice cold Fat Tire. Before dinner, I got to watch the sun set behind the Rockies from my hotel room.



The next morning, I headed to the airport, which was surprisingly far away from my "airport" hotel. The baffling signage required me to ask for directions to the security line, which snaked across the terminal floor. Someone was walking on its fabric roof, which is arrayed to look like the mountains. Favorite sight in the (long) security line: a bedraggled woman carrying on a bulging Hefty bag and a roll of paper towels. I sat in a window seat on the right side of a practically deserted plane back to Austin. Out the window, I looked over the Front Range of the Rockies, seeing the mountains one last time Ö until next time.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2009, 11:13:45 PM by RichardM »
Jeff Blaylock
Austin, Texas

"We'll be back, someday soon. We will return, someday, and when we do the gritty
splendor and the complicated grandeur of Big Bend will still be here. Waiting for us."--Ed Abbey

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Offline Al

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #28 on: July 24, 2009, 10:59:13 PM »
Wonderful trip, report and pictures!  Thanks, Jeff.

Al

PS Woodrow, Jeff's writing a book.  An autobiography which is Jeff's website.

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Offline trtlrock

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Re: Rocky Mountain National Park
« Reply #29 on: July 25, 2009, 01:09:59 PM »
Great stuff - thanks.
John & Tess

"...and I'll face each day with a smile, for the time that I've been given's such a little while..." - Arthur Lee

 


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