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Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park

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Offline wrangler88

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Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« on: August 23, 2017, 02:44:50 PM »
Just thought I'd leave this here for anyone who is interested. I finally got out to backpack on Monday during the Solar Eclipse. Went out to Dinosaur Valley with a pack that weighed just 4.5lbs before food and water. While it was super hot, I had a great time and even got a little river swimming in. These are parts 1 and 2 of my trip.
In part 1, I'm mainly hiking and talking about the eclipse. Also shows some swimming spots after lunch.



In part 2, I hike the Denio Creek trail to campsite 2. I go over some of my gear and hang around camp and the nearby creek before dinner.



Thanks for watching to anyone interested. Can't wait to get back out west pretty soon.

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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2017, 09:29:10 PM »
That was time well spent, Wrangler88...both yours on the trail, and mine watching your video. Really enjoyed it. Thanks for sharing. You remind me of a Texas version of John Viehman, longest-serving editor of Backpacking Magazine and founder of their Anyplace Wild TV series. Calm, modest, good-natured, and in love with being, as he liked to say, "anyplace wild". And, dude, THE HAIR!!!!!  :icon_eek:

You were hanging out in my old stomping grounds. I did some work on Golden-cheeked Warbler in Dinosaur Valley State Park. And I also took my family camping on those trails and in that river for the first six or seven or eight years of my kids' lives. Even spent one August there on a solo trip for my birthday. Hot, HOT, and HOTTER!!!!!!!!! And the pre-dawn spiders along those trails. Can't count how many I knocked off my face.  :willynilly:

Thanks for the demo of the Serenity Tent. Sometime in the near future, I think I'm going to have to replace my single wall Integral Designs Silshelter. The Six Moons line intrigues me. And I'd love to hear more about your little cookset and stove. What did it take to make a pot out of the Fosters can? What's its capacity and how much does it weigh?



"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline wrangler88

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2017, 05:30:15 AM »
Thanks for the demo of the Serenity Tent. Sometime in the near future, I think I'm going to have to replace my single wall Integral Designs Silshelter. The Six Moons line intrigues me. And I'd love to hear more about your little cookset and stove. What did it take to make a pot out of the Fosters can? What's its capacity and how much does it weigh?

I'm going backpacking again on Labor Day and can't decide if I want to take the Gatewood Cape and net or my Zpacks Duplex.

That stove is a BRS. It's like $15 on Amazon and weighs .9oz. Very light. Has worked great the few times I've used it. The fosters pot is the second one I got. The first one I made myself and is just a full sized fosters can with the inside of the top cut out (left the ring around the top for strength .) I just used a dremmel to cut it out. The one with the flat bottom and ridges from the video I tried to make and it didn't turn out well. So I bought that one (was actually sent to me free) from Zelph at woodgazstoves. You can look them up online. I've got a couple of his alcohol stoves. Both work well and he's nice to deal with but is out of stuff quite a bit. It's lighter and cheaper than titanium and has stood up for a while without any dents or crushing. I believe it holds 20oz to the brim which for me going solo is more than I'd ever need. I don't boil more than 12 oz at a time.

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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2017, 05:11:34 PM »
Thanks Wrangler88, I just ordered a BRS stove. It's an ounce lighter than my current Snowpeak Titanium.
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2017, 07:57:55 PM »
Thanks Wrangler88, I just ordered a BRS stove. It's an ounce lighter than my current Snowpeak Titanium.

So I have to say that I have a BRS 3000  and really like it but there are reports of some failures in the pot supports but I think that for a one or two person stove it is a great stove.  Bigger pots seem to be a potential issue.  I have had not problems with it at all.  For $15 or so I figure you have to at least try it!
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2017, 08:24:53 PM »
My thought exactly!


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Offline backpacker56

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2018, 09:23:34 AM »
I'll chime in with belated comments.  The GUMO forum has been so dead lately, I began to wonder if my computer/internet or the forum itself was not working.  In desperation I was looking at other threads and landed here.

I continue to be blown away by wrangler88's videos.  I don't know anything about video-making, but I know good stuff when I see it.  The basic quality of the raw footage is great, but the real genius is in planning the shots and assembling the clips together with great dissolves, in a way that advances the storyline.  Unlike many youtube videos that take 10 minutes to give 2 minutes' worth of information, wrangler88's videos contain no "dead wood", yet flow naturally and are not choppy or hurried.  Some filmmakers use too many short clips that jerk the viewer's attention around and leave one feeling out of breath and disoriented.  Wrangler88 knows how to let a clip run just the right length before the dissolve, and how to buffer segments that contain a lot of verbal information by interspersed clips of scenery, hiking, or wildlife.  Bravo!

Following is a link to a stove review on the BRS-3000.  This is a great site, run by a very knowledgeable guy, and there are several follow-up articles.
https://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com/2017/02/the-brs-3000t-worlds-lightest-stove.html

By the way, the Starbuck's instant coffee: since no comment was given, would I be correct in assuming it was a dud?

« Last Edit: March 12, 2018, 09:31:25 AM by backpacker56 »
"Ah, sure, I'm a gnawed old bone now, but say, don't you guys think the spirit's gone!"

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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2018, 01:01:29 PM »
Completely agree with your analysis of Wranglerís videos. Iím always impressed by them. Always look forward to them. Watching one is like hiking alongside a great trail companion.

Speaking of the BRS-3000t stove, I bought one last year and had pretty much the same experience as the tester in the link you shared: pot supports overheated and deformed. This was WITH a windscreen. My homemade titanium windscreen fits extremely snugly around my pot and stove, so that even with the exhaust holes and a low flame output, the heat at the pot bottom is fairly intense. Iíd heard of the potential deformation flaw, so fortunately I tested the stove BEFORE taking it into the field. I was able to bend the supports back but by then Iíd lost confidence in the stove. So Iíve stuck with my Snowpeak Litemax titanium stove (1.9oz). Itís an ultralight workhorse.


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"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2018, 04:46:56 PM »
Some of the pot support deformation on that stove also appear related to when it was made, earlier ones better than later.  I have one that I use with a wind screen and have had no problems

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temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

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Offline backpacker56

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2018, 06:29:17 PM »
At one time I was hankering for a Monatauk Gnat a.k.a. Fire Maple FMS-116T, which also appears in the review of the BRS-3000t.  At 48 grams, the Gnat is heavier than the 25-gram BRS, but the increase of 23 grams is insignificant to me.  I would rather have the Gnat.  It weighs a little more, and costs more, but I think it is the better stove. 

I didn't spring for the Gnat because I already had an MSR Superfly, which filled the niche of compact sit-on-top-of-canister for me, and besides, I was disappointed with the Superfly's performance in cooler weather due to the nature of canister fuels.  So I bought a Primus Express Spider, which can drink liquid fuel from an inverted canister, and so doesn't mind cool weather.  I've since come to appreciate that the sit-on-top stoves will perform okay, sort-of, if you always keep the canister warm.  This is what high-altitude climbers do, although they struggle with the low power of these stoves.  So the Gnat begins to interest me again.

Another interesting thing from the Adventures in Stoving site: If I bought the Gnat, I could trade out its base for the base off my MRS Superfly and create a Frankenstove called the SuperGnat.  Thus you'd have the lighter weight and more compact shape of the Gnat, coupled with a base that accepts either threaded or unthreaded canisters.  Pretty cool idea.  The SuperGnat would weigh about 84 grams, but that keeps it in the same league as other respectable stoves in the same category.  Read more about it:
https://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com/search?q=msr+superfly
"Ah, sure, I'm a gnawed old bone now, but say, don't you guys think the spirit's gone!"

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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2018, 12:35:35 AM »
At one time I was hankering for a Monatauk Gnat a.k.a. Fire Maple FMS-116T, which also appears in the review of the BRS-3000t.  At 48 grams, the Gnat is heavier than the 25-gram BRS, but the increase of 23 grams is insignificant to me.  I would rather have the Gnat.  It weighs a little more, and costs more, but I think it is the better stove. 

I didn't spring for the Gnat because I already had an MSR Superfly, which filled the niche of compact sit-on-top-of-canister for me, and besides, I was disappointed with the Superfly's performance in cooler weather due to the nature of canister fuels.  So I bought a Primus Express Spider, which can drink liquid fuel from an inverted canister, and so doesn't mind cool weather.  I've since come to appreciate that the sit-on-top stoves will perform okay, sort-of, if you always keep the canister warm.  This is what high-altitude climbers do, although they struggle with the low power of these stoves.  So the Gnat begins to interest me again.

Another interesting thing from the Adventures in Stoving site: If I bought the Gnat, I could trade out its base for the base off my MRS Superfly and create a Frankenstove called the SuperGnat.  Thus you'd have the lighter weight and more compact shape of the Gnat, coupled with a base that accepts either threaded or unthreaded canisters.  Pretty cool idea.  The SuperGnat would weigh about 84 grams, but that keeps it in the same league as other respectable stoves in the same category.  Read more about it:
https://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com/search?q=msr+superfly

 :great:  It might be time for another knock-down, drag-out, survival-of-the-fittest stove thread. Lots of good ideas and strong opinions on BBC. May the best stove win.
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline wrangler88

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2018, 08:25:10 AM »
Wow guys, thanks for the kind words. I see a ton of room for improvement in my videos. I actually bought some new equipment for my videos. (New external microphone with wind screen for better audio in the windy West, rechargeable led light, new tripod, etc) Hopefully I'll get a chance to use it all soon. But I've been working constantly since my OML trip. I do have plans for a week long GUMO trip later this year.

As far as the stove, my BRS experience has been up and down. It is very light. But when I stayed at the McKittrick Ridge Campsite about half way through boiling my water I could hear it dieing out. And it eventually quit before reaching a boil. I went ahead and added the water to my dehydrated beans just in case I couldn't get it back going. (So I had warm but not hot bean burritos that night.) I was able to take the stove and tap it on a log to clear whatever debris was in there. It has worked fine ever since.

Concerning the melting stove, I've always heard to not use a windscreen with a canister stove because the canister can overheat. That's the only kind of stove I don't use a screen with. I mostly use my canister stoves out West where they're required. I'd much rather use an esbit or alcohol stove. But I do really enjoy the speed and  convenience of the canister stoves.

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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2018, 03:52:54 PM »

Concerning the melting stove, I've always heard to not use a windscreen with a canister stove because the canister can overheat. That's the only kind of stove I don't use a screen with. I mostly use my canister stoves out West where they're required. I'd much rather use an esbit or alcohol stove. But I do really enjoy the speed and  convenience of the canister stoves.

Overheating a canister stove by improperly using a windscreen can, of course, be fatal. When I custom-made my ultralight titanium windscreen for my Vargo TiBot and Snowpeak Litemax stove, I went through a few iterations before I felt confident the design was safe. The windscreen fits very snugly around the TiBot pot, almost like a sleeve. It travels wrapped around the pot and when itís needed, I simply slide it downward to deploy it and protect the stove. I used a regular office-style hole-punch to create the necessary exhaust holes up high. When deployed, the bottom of the windscreen sits a little over two inches off the ground and an inch or so below the stoveís burners. Ambient air is drawn into the gap at the bottom, is heated by the stove, rises rapidly above the fuel canister and along the sides of the TiBot, exiting at the exhaust holes. The canister never gets more than barely, barely warm, even on long boils. Iíve tested it under table top conditions with a thermometer, and I can monitor it in the field by placing my finger underneath the windscreen and onto the fuel canister. Works great for one person who never boils more 750ml of water at a time. Iíve found that the canister will start to heat up if I try to boil more than that at one time. I donít do that!

That said, I like alcohol stoves, too!



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Offline wrangler88

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2018, 08:30:21 PM »
By the way, the Starbuck's instant coffee: since no comment was given, would I be correct in assuming it was a dud?

Sorry I missed this part. I actually like the instant coffee alright. It's good enough that it's worth not having to bring a French press and go through the mess of making normal coffee. Not bad at all.

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Sub 5lb Backpacking at Dinosaur Valley State Park
« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2018, 09:31:36 PM »
Wind screens can be used on upright canister stoves with proper ventilation and always will improve fuel efficiency.  Here is my take on stoves and you can see I am also a fan of Jim's work at Adventures in Stoving. 
https://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/2010/08/31/stoves-through-the-years/

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temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

 


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