Friends of Big Bend National Park
Big Bend Conservancy

Over-estimating your experience or under-estimating the terrain in a place like Big Bend can result in serious injury or death. Use the information and advice found here wisely. Climb/Hike/Camp/Drive at your own risk.

+-Calendar for sale

 2019 BigBendChat Calendar on sale now!


Howdy and planning

  • 67 Replies
  • 25770 Views
*

Offline TexasGirl

  • Black Bear
  • *
  • 460
Howdy and planning
« Reply #30 on: July 06, 2006, 11:47:22 AM »
Thanks, BDann.  By my count, you had 7-8 L of water, roughly 2 gals.  Was that for 2 days/one overnight?  

I've been walking around w/ 2 2L ozarka bottles and they fit pretty well, so I think I'll stick w/ them.  I have a small (1.8L) platypus that I'll take along, too.  BF probably has his Army canteen from Viet Nam.  It should be an interesting conglomeration of gear!

Need to stop at the lockers in Fbg and get some dried sausage... yummm.
As a matter of fact, I _do_ have an opinion on that....

*

Offline bdann

  • Creosote
  • Mountain Lion
  • *
  • 1863
Howdy and planning
« Reply #31 on: July 06, 2006, 12:50:44 PM »
Quote from: "TexasGirl"
Was that for 2 days/one overnight?  


Yep.

It was also more than I needed, I poured out well over one liter after filling my canteen up before the hike down from the South Rim.  It wasn't hot though, we got lucky.  

Always bring more than you think you need.  If you're going on an overnight hike, you'll need water to clean up, brush teeth, etc, also if your food requires  water, and then just hanging around your campsite it's nice to have some water to drink.  

You never know why you might need extra.  For example, Sunday afternoon when we arrived at our campsite on the Rim, I removed the top from my canteen, took a big drink, then set it on the ground.  Then I promptly knocked it over and spilled the rest of the water out!
WATER, It does a body good.

*

Offline TexasGirl

  • Black Bear
  • *
  • 460
Howdy and planning
« Reply #32 on: July 06, 2006, 11:37:17 PM »
"But, what would I attach my pole badges to?"

This made me think about the wooden hiking stick my dad got when he climbed Mt Fuji in 195_....hang on...1953.  He always told me, 'you hike Fuji at night, so you make it to the top in time to watch the sunrise.'  He bought the staff at the bottom, and at each way station, attendants branded the stick with an Arabic numeral and Japanese symbol for that station.  Such a neat thing to me--to have that tangible memory--he was a great one for making slides, but not much on souvenirs.  It was always in the back corner of his closet, but it's in my living room now.  

He always wanted to go to Big Bend.
As a matter of fact, I _do_ have an opinion on that....

*

Offline 10ftTall&BulletPrf

  • Black Bear
  • *
  • 205
Howdy and planning
« Reply #33 on: July 07, 2006, 08:46:53 AM »
Quote from: "TexasGirl"
This made me think about the wooden hiking stick my dad got when he climbed Mt Fuji in 195_....hang on...1953.  He always told me, 'you hike Fuji at night, so you make it to the top in time to watch the sunrise.'  He bought the staff at the bottom, and at each way station, attendants branded the stick with an Arabic numeral and Japanese symbol for that station.  Such a neat thing to me--to have that tangible memory--he was a great one for making slides, but not much on souvenirs.  It was always in the back corner of his closet, but it's in my living room now.  
He always wanted to go to Big Bend.


See, now THAT'S COOL! Kinda hard to do on titanium.

Me and my hiking stick want to go to Mt Fuji for some Branding!

Here's me and my stick...

"You may all go to work and I will go to Big Bend" - If Davy Crockett were alive today.

*

Offline jim2

  • jim2
  • Mountain Lion
  • *
  • 1098
trekking poles
« Reply #34 on: July 07, 2006, 04:28:22 PM »
i bought a pair of rei ascent trekking poles some time back . i don't go for a hike without them . they do take some getting used to ,practice before hand. richard posted an article on the proper way to tie your boots and use your poles some where on this board , it contained very useful info . perhaps he will post a link .please richard . the poles save a lot of wear on my knees .

*

Offline RichardM

  • Admin/Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Mountain Lion
  • *
  • 7618
Re: trekking poles
« Reply #35 on: July 07, 2006, 04:39:35 PM »
Quote from: "jim2"
i bought a pair of rei ascent trekking poles some time back . i don't go for a hike without them . they do take some getting used to ,practice before hand. richard posted an article on the proper way to tie your boots and use your poles some where on this board , it contained very useful info . perhaps he will post a link .please richard . the poles save a lot of wear on my knees .

Took me a while to remember where that post was.
The boot lacing website is http://www.hitthetrail.com/lacing.htm
The hiking staff info is at http://www.backpacking.net/bad-back.html#poles

*

Offline TexasGirl

  • Black Bear
  • *
  • 460
Howdy and planning
« Reply #36 on: July 07, 2006, 05:02:29 PM »
Continued thanks to everyone who is providing info and help.  What a great community!

For today's question, let me know what you think about these options I've cooked up, please.

Option 1
Pinnacles trail to Toll Mtn #1, overnight.  Boot Canyon/SE Rim/NE Rim trails to SW#4, overnight.  Laguna Meadows trail down.  

Option 2
Laguna Meadows trail to a Laguna Meadows campsite or Colima #3, overnight.  Colima to Boot Canyon trail to SE & NE Rim, to SW#4, overnight.  Down BC/Pinnacles trail.

My concerns are:  my condition; my tendency to get migraines at altitude, esp. if there is a front anywhere near (within a day away); my desire to not be completely wiped at the end of the day so we can enjoy each other's company.  (what's the blushing emoticon?)
As a matter of fact, I _do_ have an opinion on that....

*

Offline Roy

  • Mountain Lion
  • *
  • 1529
Howdy and planning
« Reply #37 on: July 07, 2006, 05:14:35 PM »
Talk to your MD about this one.  Your headaches are probably a mild case of altitude sickness.  A couple of my friends that like to snow ski have been taking along a  blood pressure medication named Diovan to prevent problems when they get up in the mountains.  I live in Corpus and anything higher than a freeway overpass will sometimes cause nose bleeds, etc. :)   I doubt this is an approved use for the drug, but it seems to be a fairly common practice.

*

Offline Al

  • Dog Face Moth
  • Mountain Lion
  • *
  • 4095
Howdy and planning
« Reply #38 on: July 07, 2006, 07:39:32 PM »
Quote from: "TexasGirl"
Thanks, BDann.  By my count, you had 7-8 L of water, roughly 2 gals.  Was that for 2 days/one overnight?  

I've been walking around w/ 2 2L ozarka bottles and they fit pretty well, so I think I'll stick w/ them.  I have a small (1.8L) platypus that I'll take along, too.  BF probably has his Army canteen from Viet Nam.  It should be an interesting conglomeration of gear!

Need to stop at the lockers in Fbg and get some dried sausage... yummm.


Take a look at the water requirements for the meals you plan to cook.  Although they may seem heavy, some canned goods are actually a pretty good deal because most of the weight is water that you would otherwise have to add from your limited water supply.  

Be sure you are hydrated before getting on the trail.  If you had a few toddies for the body the night before be sure and drink plenty of water when you get up the next morning before you hit the trail.

Although not brought up, I'm a big trash bag guy.   8)   An incredibly versitile and featherlight object that can be used for everything from a poor man's pancho to carrying out your trash.  

I carry water in 1 or 2 liter Nalgene or polycarbonate (cleaned plastic soda) bottles all in the pack except for a liter to drink while hiking.  I like to put my clothing and stuff such as my sleeping bag, that I want to make double sure doesn't get wet, in trash bags.  Makes it easy to organize and load and unload the pack plus once you get to the campsite you can pull the trash bags out and have easy access to your stuff.  Trash bags provide insurance in case of water leakage, although I've never had a problem.  From a practical viewpoint if a bottle did leak the biggest problem is the water loss.  Stuff will dry quick in desert, unless it's raining in which case it doesn't hurt to use a tarp or trash bag to help capture the rain for whatever use you desire.  There is no such thing as having too much water in the desert.  Worst case scenerio you can wash your hair or take a sponge bath.

Al

*

Ray52

  • Guest
Howdy and planning
« Reply #39 on: July 07, 2006, 09:09:52 PM »
I think both planned routes will work for you.  With the conditioning you're already doing and an early start you should complete any of the legs of your hike early enough to set camp, explore the surrounding area, and have plenty of reserve energy to enjoy the rest of the evening.  I strongly reccomend SW3 for spectacular sunsets.

*

Offline RichardM

  • Admin/Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Mountain Lion
  • *
  • 7618
Howdy and planning
« Reply #40 on: July 07, 2006, 10:10:04 PM »
Quote from: "TexasGirl"
Option 1
Pinnacles trail to Toll Mtn #1, overnight.  Boot Canyon/SE Rim/NE Rim trails to SW#4, overnight.  Laguna Meadows trail down.  

Option 2
Laguna Meadows trail to a Laguna Meadows campsite or Colima #3, overnight.  Colima to Boot Canyon trail to SE & NE Rim, to SW#4, overnight.  Down BC/Pinnacles trail.

My concerns are:  my condition; my tendency to get migraines at altitude, esp. if there is a front anywhere near (within a day away); my desire to not be completely wiped at the end of the day so we can enjoy each other's company.  (what's the blushing emoticon?)

I like Option 1.  I prefer hiking up steep trails with a heavy pack rather than coming down them.  The Pinnacles can be murder on sore or weak knees when coming down.  There's a section or two where you're constantly stepping down off of steps that seem like they're three feet high (or at least they did on my first South Rim day hike when I didn't have a hiking staff).  Be sure and day-hike up Emory Peak before you saddle up and head for the Rim.  You should have plenty of time.  I'd love to catch a sunrise from up there.  The Toll Mountain campsite supposedly has a great sunset view.  The Emory Peak site is pretty exposed, so make sure there are no storms headed your way.  Great spot for a sunrise, though.

SW4 is great in that it's a short walk to fantastic sunrise and sunset viewpoints.  Of course, your view from the site itself is of just trees.  Don't pass up the opportunity to stand or sit on the South Rim at night and look out over the desert bathed in the moon and star light.  Take along your sleeping pad and you might need more than the blushing emoticon.  :oops:  :D  :oops:

Coming down the Laguna Meadows trail will be a lot gentler on your knees, but make sure your boots fit and are laced properly or your toes might not be so happy.

*

Offline TheWildWestGuy

  • Golden Eagle
  • Mountain Lion
  • *
  • 1342
Howdy and planning
« Reply #41 on: July 07, 2006, 10:12:07 PM »
I think the Laguna Meadows route/option would be a good 1st night's campsite if you get a late start (like 1-3pm) but its only ~2 hours hike from the Basin so if you start early (before 11) I would go on up the Pinnacles Trail to Colima #1 or the Rim on the 1st night.  If you camp at Laguna Meadows try to get LW1 campsite its about 1/2 mile off the main trail and has great views of Emory Peak, Laguna Meadows and the very distinct treeline between the desert plants and the forests.  Really depends on what time you get on the trail in the morning and how much in-camp time you want..TWWG

*

Offline Al

  • Dog Face Moth
  • Mountain Lion
  • *
  • 4095
Alto Relex
« Reply #42 on: July 07, 2006, 10:22:42 PM »
Here are some pictures from the two day hikes I recommend from the primative campgrounds at Alto Relex.  

Coming in there is one streambed that will probably cause pause before attempting on Ore Road from the North.  We've made it without a problem with a 2 wheel drive S-10 and small Toyota trucks.  Just hit it at an angle and keep moving.  Bring a shovel just in case.

http://groups.msn.com/bigbendphotos/telephonecanyon.msnw?Page=1

The Big Bend Sunset is from zone camping around Elephant Tusk which is a bit south of Pine Canyon. Pine Canyon is a great primative campsite to enjoy a Big Bend Sunset and view of the del Carmens.  Your Ranger will easily get you there in my experience.  

Al

*

Offline TexasGirl

  • Black Bear
  • *
  • 460
Howdy and planning
« Reply #43 on: July 07, 2006, 11:34:44 PM »
Quote
Take a look at the water requirements for the meals you plan to cook. Although they may seem heavy, some canned goods are actually a pretty good deal because most of the weight is water that you would otherwise have to add from your limited water supply. Be sure you are hydrated before getting on the trail. If you had a few toddies for the body the night before


Yeah, we've talked about this and I think we're going w/ cans, dried sausage, clif bars & so forth.  He has a tiny stove that uses solid-fuel pellets (haven't seen it but it sounds more sophisticated than the esbit stove REI sells).  No toddies for me, but thanks for the reminder to "tank up."

Quote
Your headaches are probably a mild case of altitude sickness.

When I helped chaperone my son's school trip to the big bend a few yrs ago, we spent our first full day hiking over the ridge & down into Ft Davis then to the observatory.  At the obsv, I got a terrible headache on the top of my head, which I have since figured out will turn into a migraine, and they happen here at 400 ft elev when a front is coming in, low pressure systems mostly.  Makes sense that lower pressure up high would do the same thing.  Anyway...I might try to squeeze in appt w/ neuro before we go but always have meds w/ me.  Thank you, Roy, for your very thoughtful reply.  

Quote
murder on sore or weak knees when coming down

that was part of my thinking...other part was that I'd be better off fresh and most enthusiastic doing what seems the hardest part of the route.

Quote
Take along your sleeping pad and you might need more

Aw, shucks, Richard, now I _am_ blushing.  Great idea!  Hope we don't cause anyone else to need the  :shock: emoticon!!  

I learned that boot-lacing trick but just with one "stop" a year or so ago.  Works like a charm to keep my toes wiggly and ankles happy.  

Ray, thanks for the word on SW3, and TWWG, thanks for the LW1 suggestion.  

Thank you thank you thank you all for sharing my enthusiasm and helping me plan!
As a matter of fact, I _do_ have an opinion on that....

*

Offline TexasGirl

  • Black Bear
  • *
  • 460
Howdy and planning
« Reply #44 on: July 07, 2006, 11:39:15 PM »
Quote
Me and my hiking stick want to go to Mt Fuji for some Branding!


Field trip for BBC gang to Mt Fuji?  Your hiking staff looks like it's well on it's way to being a prize for someone's living room...in several decades!
As a matter of fact, I _do_ have an opinion on that....

 


©COPYRIGHT NOTICE

All photographs and content posted by members are to be considered copyrighted by their respective owners and may not be used for any purposes, commercial or otherwise, without permission.

+-Calendar For Sale

 2019 BigBendChat Calendar on sale now!

Powered by EzPortal

Facebook Comments