Big Bend Chat

Big Bend Community => The Marathon Board => Topic started by: Moose on September 05, 2019, 05:39:43 PM

Title: Pinto Canyon Road trip planning (north to south)
Post by: Moose on September 05, 2019, 05:39:43 PM

trying to plan my second trip to Big Bend area later this year.   I am wanting to drive Pinto Canyon road from Marfa to Ruidoso.
I have 4x4 with sufficient clearance, full size spare, directions covered and all that jazz

My questions concern while I'm in the area....

1.  is everything private property except for the actual road?  If I wanted to walk off the road a couple of hundred yards to see a rock or a view,  is that ok?
2.  is it legal to pull over and eat a sandwich and take pictures?  (I know this is not a highway but a dirt road and narrow in places)
3.  would it be legal to fly a drone (I know drones are illegal to take-off, operate or land inside BBNP)  this road is not inside park boundaries.

might be stupid questions but just wanting to be legal and respectful as a visitor.

rowdy

Title: Re: Pinto Canyon Road trip planning (north to south)
Post by: The Scorpion on September 05, 2019, 06:14:53 PM
I have done Pinto Canyon once, only encountered 1 other vehicle and saw no one else. clearance was not an issue and didnt need 4x4 it was a pretty decent dirt/gravel/rocky road
Stopping for pics and having lunch wont be an issue just dont block the road if you want to walk around for more then a few minutes.
There is an old abandon truck somewhere on the northern part, its seriously right off the road, just not much around it to make it interesting, but a lone abandon truck with nothing for miles makes a good pic as well.

Im not certain, but believe all the property surrounding the road is private land, just dont cross any fences or barriers, I cant recall the frequency of Private Property signs I saw, but I know a few are back there.
Wont have an issue with the drone, land owners might not like it, but nothing they can do legally.

If you are lucky you wont see anyone else.
Title: Re: Pinto Canyon Road trip planning (north to south)
Post by: jim2 on September 05, 2019, 06:38:53 PM
The land is private on both sides of the road, don't trespass. I've been told by a local that the folks from Pinto Canyon Ranch are very strict about trespassers. You can park, very little traffic, take pictures, eat, just don't leave the road. 
Title: Re: Pinto Canyon Road trip planning (north to south)
Post by: Moose on September 05, 2019, 09:04:26 PM
The land is private on both sides of the road, don't trespass. I've been told by a local that the folks from Pinto Canyon Ranch are very strict about trespassers. You can park, very little traffic, take pictures, eat, just don't leave the road. 


this is what I figured.  thanks.   do not want to disrespect or get in trouble.    I'm sure any picture opportunity from the actual road will be just as great.  looking forward to this drive.

rowdy
Title: Re: Pinto Canyon Road trip planning (north to south)
Post by: miatarchy04 on September 06, 2019, 09:46:16 AM
If you are interested in the background and history of Pinto Canyon, check out the book: In the Shadow of the Chinatis http://www.bigbendchat.com/portal/forum/big-bend-book-reviews/in-the-shadow-of-the-chinatis/
Title: Re: Pinto Canyon Road trip planning (north to south)
Post by: Flash on September 06, 2019, 07:10:55 PM
If you are interested in the background and history of Pinto Canyon, check out the book: In the Shadow of the Chinatis http://www.bigbendchat.com/portal/forum/big-bend-book-reviews/in-the-shadow-of-the-chinatis/
Looks like an interesting read! Does it mention the Means family?
Title: Re: Pinto Canyon Road trip planning (north to south)
Post by: miatarchy04 on September 07, 2019, 09:17:01 AM
If you are interested in the background and history of Pinto Canyon, check out the book: In the Shadow of the Chinatis http://www.bigbendchat.com/portal/forum/big-bend-book-reviews/in-the-shadow-of-the-chinatis/
Looks like an interesting read! Does it mention the Means family?
Nope. But if you're interested in that topic you should find a copy of Pancho Villa Days in Pilares by Joyce Means. Much of this book consists of stories the author learned from her uncle Evans Means who lived in western Presidio county for many decades. Try and find a copy of the "revised edition" because it is 200% larger than the first ed. Unfortunately this book is scarce and expensive. There's a copy for sale on ebay now for $160 (with postage) "or best offer."
Title: Re: Pinto Canyon Road trip planning (north to south)
Post by: Flash on September 07, 2019, 10:56:01 AM
If you are interested in the background and history of Pinto Canyon, check out the book: In the Shadow of the Chinatis http://www.bigbendchat.com/portal/forum/big-bend-book-reviews/in-the-shadow-of-the-chinatis/
Looks like an interesting read! Does it mention the Means family?
Nope. But if you're interested in that topic you should find a copy of Pancho Villa Days in Pilares by Joyce Means. Much of this book consists of stories the author learned from her uncle Evans Means who lived in western Presidio county for many decades. Try and find a copy of the "revised edition" because it is 200% larger than the first ed. Unfortunately this book is scarce and expensive. There's a copy for sale on ebay now for $160 (with postage) "or best offer."
So many great books! Your post reminded me of reading about Evans Means (and Chico Cano and Captain Matlack) in Chapter 7 of More Tales of the Big Bend by Elton Miles. This is a fascinating tale set in the Sierra Vieja.
Title: Re: Pinto Canyon Road trip planning (north to south)
Post by: Jonathan Sadow on November 08, 2019, 09:47:05 PM
If you are interested in the background and history of Pinto Canyon, check out the book: In the Shadow of the Chinatis http://www.bigbendchat.com/portal/forum/big-bend-book-reviews/in-the-shadow-of-the-chinatis/
Looks like an interesting read! Does it mention the Means family?
Nope. But if you're interested in that topic you should find a copy of Pancho Villa Days in Pilares by Joyce Means. Much of this book consists of stories the author learned from her uncle Evans Means who lived in western Presidio county for many decades. Try and find a copy of the "revised edition" because it is 200% larger than the first ed. Unfortunately this book is scarce and expensive. There's a copy for sale on ebay now for $160 (with postage) "or best offer."

While searching for this book, I came across this:

Obituary - Joyce Means (https://vhtx.news/2019/09/20/joyce-means/)

Amazon has a couple of copies available for $200 each.  I wouldn't be surprised if there were a copy in the Sul Ross State library, however.