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Badlands, Texas

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Offline Casa Grande

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Badlands, Texas
« on: November 24, 2015, 10:08:43 PM »
Watching now on NatGeo. Pretty good but you can certainly tell the "inflated reality."

David

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Offline Dinohunter

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2015, 07:23:10 AM »
Pretty good. But if the entire purpose of the show was to talk about Glens murder, why wait until the last 5 minutes to bring it up?

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Offline Casa Grande

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2015, 07:56:40 AM »
It's a series. They have to string it out.  Otherwise it would only take 10 minutes to tell the whole thing.

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Offline Summit

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2015, 05:08:28 AM »
I watched the series with great interest.  I love Big Bend NP and have enjoyed meals at La Kiva at the end of backpacking trips and this whole incident went down just a few months before my last visit to the area (spring 2014) and I'd not heard anything about the accusation of murder nor about the trial, so I was intrigued.

The strengths:
*Excellent photography (it is Nat Geo after all, and the area makes a photographer's job easy).
 *Nice method of focusing on a handful of specific individuals in the community who knew the people well--this was probably the most important choice the producers made and for the most part I thought it worked really well. I enjoyed not having a narrator give me the info, but rather getting it from the people.

Weaknesses:
* Repetitiveness of certain images/ scenes, especially when going to commercial. Also, they had a tendency to sort of 'Hollywoodify' the area a bit it seemed to me with certain montages of men drinking shots and blood being spilled on the dessert sand.  I couldn't help but think how difficult and frustrating it would be to folks who knew Glenn to see his tragedy packaged into a slick, hyper-produced show that has the goal of attracting attention.
*The one individual that they leaned on a bit too much is the guy with the eye-patch.  Unlike the others, his relationship to Glenn and Tony was not apparent.  His role seemed to be to philosophize about life out on the edges of civilization.  At first I enjoyed the life observations made by this West TX outlaw, but by the end I started questioning if he was fed lines by the producers (the whole railroad story, for example, or his ramblings on betrayal).  He was so quintessentially West TX with his whole look and way of being that he almost seemed like a caricature.  I wish they'd explained who he was (and why throughout the four or five shows he only has the same two beer bottles on that table his feet are leaning on)!

As for the real-life incident: what a shame.  It all seems very fishy to me.  I don't buy the defense's story one bit.  That lawyer seemed so self-satisfied with how clever he was and how he was able to get Tony off.  I am disappointed, too, in the jury and how the entire case exemplifies the limits of our justice system.  I'd love to hear what locals of Terlingua think of this show and it's premise.  It very clearly attempts to get the audience to feel that Tony was in fact guilty.  Is that how most residents feel?  I wish we could hear from the jurors on their reasoning.

   

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Offline marufo

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2015, 03:41:38 PM »
That show is kind of a sensitive subject, locally. I think it has done more to create division in Terlingua than the trial did. I think it's safe to say that most folks in town opposed the show out of concern that it would present a caricature of Terlingua and sensationalize Glenn's death - a concern that the show seems to me to have proven justified. Bill Ivey refused to let the show film on his properties (Starlight, Trading Company etc.) as did the new owner of La Kiva.

I know most of the folks featured on the show and like and respect at least some of them - I just think they exercised poor judgement in participating.

BTW, the guy with the eyepatch is an actor who lives in Marfa...

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Offline Casa Grande

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2015, 09:22:14 PM »
BTW, the guy with the eyepatch is an actor who lives in Marfa...

Yeah. I knew that and you can tell, he's not very good.

But, of course it's Hollywood. It's going be sensationalistic.  However, I find the participants to show raw, genuine emotions.  I find them to be likeable and present Glen in a positive light.   My thinking is if you don't want to participate then don't, but don't vilify those who do.  Second, if you're concerned about how they "present" the Terlingua community, then why not participate and show them the real deal? It doesn't make sense to me.

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Offline Zopilote

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2015, 07:36:12 AM »
Don't foreget it'a a reality show.  The "real deal" might not be what hollywood wants.

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Offline Demon Deacon

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2015, 07:41:47 AM »

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Offline Summit

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2015, 08:16:08 AM »
Thanks, Demon Deacon, for posting that link.  Very well written piece that made me want to meet Ty.

I can respect and understand the hesitation among Terlinguans to not want to be involved in a production created and controlled by outsiders.  If you choose to participate, yes, you can do your part to "present" yourself and your place in the light you choose, but the ultimate arbiter of what goes in and what gets cut and how it is put together is someone else.  The subjects made the show what it was, IMO, and I really admire just how open some of them were with what must be a very personal experience.  I am sure they were remunerated for their time, so there is that, but that doesn't diminish my admiration much. 

Questions: has Tony moved away?  Are the new La Kiva owners changing the spirit of the place drastically?

Lastly, at the end of the last episode the Defending attorney implied that the worker who came in at 4am and then again later (and eventually made the 911 call) may have run over Glen's body unknowingly, but it was unclear if that was a major factor that swayed the jurors.  That seemed crazy to me.  Wouldn't the medical examiner be able to confirm or refute that possibility based on the autopsy report? 

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Offline Zopilote

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2015, 12:27:07 PM »
Just one more comment on these types of show.  At least untile next year.
  About ten yrs ago they filmed some locals in a documetary called Gohst Town 24 Hours.  That short set the bar prety high for future pprojects.  It won an emmy.  If you check it out, notice that during the inteview with Kerry at La Kiva, there  is a cucaracha runnig around on the back wall.  Now that's reality!  Or is it ?  Maybe the cackroach was  from  Marfa..    Safe and Happy New Year to all.

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Offline Summit

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2015, 03:42:40 PM »
I'd mistakenly thought the show was over.  I guess there are 8 total episodes and I'd only seen 5.  The point I'd made about lack of plausibility about the defense attorney's implication that the cook accidentally ran over a knocked out Glen was addressed in this week's episode--as I'd thought, it seems very dubious and it's unclear why that lack of reasoning/ evidence didn't sway the jury. 

Also interesting was Rhonda's reaction in the courthouse parking lot--she did NOT want anyone from Terlingua to see her talking to the cameras at that particular moment.  Interesting. 

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Kinsa

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2016, 10:26:04 PM »
I just binge-watched all 8 episodes.  (I'm home today, sick.  Ugh.)

My knowledge of the Big Bend area is very limited and rather new.  This show told quite a story.  I do feel that the show gave a good impression of who Glenn Felts was, as well as show a bit about attitude of the community.  I did notice some prominent landmarks were missing from the show (ie, the Starlight Theater).  I will be entering the community soon as a neophyte with little prior knowledge of "how things used to be", but I can only hope that the community can heal from this tragedy and move forward.  I'd be interested in learning more about how the community has changed and about the rift that the filming of this series caused among the locals, if anyone is willing to expound.

It was worth spending a sick day watching all 8 episodes. 

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Offline Casa Grande

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2016, 10:43:10 PM »
I thought it was a good show, save for the Hollywood creative license, and I thought they did a good job showcasing Terlingua in a good light.  I think the hostility created by those who were offended at the mere thought of having their little community magnified by Hollywood was a bit presumptuous and overreactive.

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Offline Jonathan Sadow

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2016, 02:28:33 AM »
I just binge-watched all 8 episodes.  (I'm home today, sick.  Ugh.)

My knowledge of the Big Bend area is very limited and rather new.  This show told quite a story.  I do feel that the show gave a good impression of who Glenn Felts was, as well as show a bit about attitude of the community.  I did notice some prominent landmarks were missing from the show (ie, the Starlight Theater).  I will be entering the community soon as a neophyte with little prior knowledge of "how things used to be", but I can only hope that the community can heal from this tragedy and move forward.  I'd be interested in learning more about how the community has changed and about the rift that the filming of this series caused among the locals, if anyone is willing to expound.

It was worth spending a sick day watching all 8 episodes.

I can shed a little bit of light on this.  The reason you didn't see the Starlight was because the owner didn't want to participate in the show and wouldn't allow the producers to film there.  For people familiar with the town and especially its social scene, that was a big absence, as you noted.  There was a general divide in the town concerning the show.  Some were like the Starlight owner and thought it would make them look like a bunch of weirdos, and so they didn't want to have anything to do with it.  Others (the ones who appeared on the show, obviously) participated in the hope that they could influence the message projected by the show.  Overall, I liked the show, although it seemed a bit padded to me.  NatGeoTV probably asked for eight episodes, so the producers edited eight episodes out of their material.

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Offline presidio

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Re: Badlands, Texas
« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2016, 09:28:42 AM »
I can only hope that the community can heal from this tragedy

Some were like the Starlight owner and thought it would make them look like a bunch of weirdos, and so they didn't want to have anything to do with it.  Others (the ones who appeared on the show, obviously) participated in the hope that they could influence the message projected by the show.  Overall, I liked the show, although it seemed a bit padded to me.

The other "tragedy" is the unprecedented and ongoing descent of National Geographic from a respected source of journalism into the cheap thrills of seedy "reality" tv, and turning a 60 minute story into 8 hours of considerable droning repetition to incorporate as much commercial space as possible. Click bait TV.
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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

 


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