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LIVING IN TERLINGUA

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Offline CactusFlower

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Re: LIVING IN TERLINGUA
« Reply #30 on: January 19, 2010, 08:34:50 PM »
I actually think moving is a great idea but the timing might not be best for your family.  14 is a hard age.  She might come to appreciate Terlinqua but she also may resent you for years to come.  What does she say when you talk to her about it?  You have given this quite a bit of thought.  What about renting one of those places for 3 months this summer with the whole family?  You'll learn a lot from talking to locals about your self-sustainable ideas and also see how your family does during what could be considered the hardest (hottest!) months.  That might help to inform your decision.

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Offline jeffblaylock

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Re: LIVING IN TERLINGUA
« Reply #31 on: January 19, 2010, 10:55:03 PM »
Mother Crow, perhaps you'll find some inspiration in another Crow (if you haven't found her already). She is a serious thru-hiker during the temperate months and a hermit off the grid in the Northwest during the winter. Of course, she has abundant water -- something a hermit pad in Terlingua does not. But, there's plenty of advice in her blog:

As the Crow Flies
Jeff Blaylock
Austin, Texas

"We'll be back, someday soon. We will return, someday, and when we do the gritty
splendor and the complicated grandeur of Big Bend will still be here. Waiting for us."--Ed Abbey

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Offline Quatro

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Re: LIVING IN TERLINGUA
« Reply #32 on: January 19, 2010, 10:59:26 PM »
I admire your willingness to think (and maybe live) outside the box.  

"Food ... I want to make this move as a living lesson in self-sustainability.  So I will learn my lessons the hard way by trial and error.  In a perfect scenario, we'll be able to provide most of our food at home."

I couldn't help thinking of the book Into the Wild when I read this statement. I doubt the creeks will rise for long enough in Terlinqua to cause any problems.  But if you find any abandoned buses, you might want to avoid them.  

It sounds as if your story might make a good blog.  I wouldn't call it "The Oasis of my Soul".  But if you can make it even half as good as that blog, you've got a winner. Regardless, please keep us posted.


When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro - HST

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Offline ogt

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Re: LIVING IN TERLINGUA
« Reply #33 on: January 30, 2010, 09:37:38 PM »
I personally believe an individual or 2 people can make it on very little if they are interested in living primatively. Most of us dont know how to do that.  It would take lots of research and preperation but these kinds of people can be the leaders in showing us how it can be done and getting back to the way we were made to live. In my opinion of course.

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Offline Mama Crow

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Re: LIVING IN TERLINGUA
« Reply #34 on: February 15, 2010, 10:37:04 PM »
Thank y'all for the positive comments, and small votes of confidence.

I have to keep reminding myself that I do not need anyone's permission, per se, and also to not take negative opinions personally.

But, alas, I am a girl.

I asked for feedback, and that is exactly what I got ... so it's really all good!

 :eusa_dance:


"The world breaks everyone and, afterward, some are strong at the broken places." - Ernest Hemingway

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Offline xanadurealm

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Re: LIVING IN TERLINGUA
« Reply #35 on: April 16, 2010, 06:05:34 AM »

 What I see, as to living in Terlingua, is the harsh weather.  The winter doesn't bother me but the summer temps without a/c is really harsh.  Try turning off your a/c for about a week.  In fact why not try it during the hottest week of the year.  Most folks get their chores done in the morning then take refuge somewhere during the hottest part of the day.  That is what I would be preparing to learn how to do.

It appears lots of folks are able to learn to handle it somehow.  It also appears to me that men are able to tolerate it better than women because many of them have jobs like construction where they work without the benefit of a/c.  With the limited water supply, you just can't take a shower anytime you want.

I have heard from visitors that some drive into town for the benefit of the a/c at the local businesses.

The second thing that I see is the wear and tear on vehicle and tires, not to mention the cost of gasoline to get from point a to point b.  You can't afford to run out of gas, have a flat without a spare tire, you must be able to do your own car repairs or have your car towed somewhere to get it fixed if you can't start it.

Just some food for thought.  Xana

 


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