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Oak Spring Pipeline

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Oak Spring Pipeline
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2020, 07:21:32 AM »
Old problem but a surprisingly thorough article.  Part of the answer has to be keeping the same or reducing the numbers of people allowed in the Basin and increasing efficiencies.
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
minimum 1 gallon water per person/day
no shade, no water
http://40yearsofwalking.wordpress.com/

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Offline steelfrog

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Re: Oak Spring Pipeline
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2020, 08:43:51 AM »
My guess is a catchment system will be at least part of the solution; they recently installed one at the Tipoff on South Kaibab in Grand Canyon; they've had a lot of pipeline issues there in recent years

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Offline rocketman

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Re: Oak Spring Pipeline
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2020, 04:49:52 PM »
Super Bob seems like a smart guy.
Making ice cubes FROM THE SUN!!!

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Offline Casa Grande

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Re: Oak Spring Pipeline
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2020, 06:00:16 AM »
I think I'm in the wrong business. I should have been a ditch digger.

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Offline elhombre

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Re: Oak Spring Pipeline
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2020, 12:02:04 PM »
Interesting title to the article.  Don't know what "Climate Change" has to do with it.  My take away is that the pipeline needs to be replaced due to age.  Sounds like a great move to me.  They also say they have no idea where half the water they pump through that pipeline is actually going.  Hmmmmm.  Maybe this issue should be addressed first? 

If they aren't going to increase occupancy in the Basin, it would seem that there is a ceiling to the amount of water that is needed, and that figure should already be known.  As a person whose entire house relies solely on rain water for all my needs, my experience says they simply need to increase storage.  When rains are good, I top off my tanks.  They effectively closed off the trail that goes by the existing basin water storage tank, freeing up space.  I would think they could build another tank up there at least half the size as the existing one increasing capacity to 1.5 million gallons.  THAT'S alot of water!   Not really seeing any need to go find a new source.  Also, if they are aren't going to use any more water, does that mean the septic system doesn't have to be increased?   Doesn't really matter.  The park is going to do what ever they want to do.  :great:

Heck, in the spirit of the Superintendent's answer to all problems, simply place a tax on all rooms so that the users pay for the fixes.  Just please be smart about it, and fix all the water problems before they go about rebuilding all the structures in the Basin. Thanks for posting the article.
If other countries on the planet want to see America suffer and ultimately destroyed, who are they cheering for right now?  Trump, or the leftist democrats and their media supported hate machine?

Seek out the facts for yourself.  Begin by using Startpage.com,  not google.

May God Bless America!

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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Oak Spring Pipeline
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2020, 02:27:15 PM »
As a person whose entire house relies solely on rain water for all my needs, my experience says they simply need to increase storage.  When rains are good, I top off my tanks. 

The following question is only on-topic by the thinnest of connecting threads, but how much storage do you use for your home, elhombre?  And how did you settle upon that amount? I'm getting ready to do the same thing.  The first outstanding example of this I ever saw was at the NPS' new visitor center for Great Sand Dunes NP and it has remained an inspiration to me.
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline Flash

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Re: Oak Spring Pipeline
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2020, 02:42:08 PM »
Super Bob seems to be a man with a hammer in his hand...   :eusa_think:

BTW & FWIW - There are TWO storage tanks above the cabins.  Not sure when they squeezed in the second much larger tank, maybe back in 2010 or 11? Also, there are two down at Oak Spring, so it looks like there is some flexibility to prevent disruption in case power goes down, pump failures, etc. 

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Offline elhombre

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Re: Oak Spring Pipeline
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2020, 06:26:15 PM »
Before I ran screaming out of my tax obsessed home town Austin, I paid attention to how much water we used via the water bill.  3000 gallons a month.  I didn't water outside at all, didn't conserve in the house, and had a big fat clothes washing machine that had to fill up all the way.  Knowing this number, I opted for 30,000 gallons of storage.  Three 10,000 gallon tanks.   Built my own Barndominuim for catching rainwater that my tanks and I live under.  5400 square feet of catching area.  Much smaller living area.  1 inch of rain on 1000 square feet gets a person 600 gallons of water, if you catch it all.  The math says when I get 1 inch of rain, I get 3200 gallons of water.   IF I catch it all.   Big problem in the hill country is that when storms come, they dump like crazy.  You really need to design a system to handle the big fast rains.

Lived here for 15 years.   Worst time we made it through, it didn't rain for 59 days some 7 years back.  Still had 30% left.  I still don't water outside.   But I do fill up a 4 foot x 16 foot swimming pool every summer.

It all depends on where you live,  I 35 (the Balcones Escarpment) is a dividing line where rain fall totals change dramatically, so the design needs to reflect your specific area's annual rainfall.  I strongly encourage you to make the switch to rain water.  God always provides!   :great:
If other countries on the planet want to see America suffer and ultimately destroyed, who are they cheering for right now?  Trump, or the leftist democrats and their media supported hate machine?

Seek out the facts for yourself.  Begin by using Startpage.com,  not google.

May God Bless America!

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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Oak Spring Pipeline
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2020, 06:47:43 PM »
Before I ran screaming out of my tax obsessed home town Austin, I paid attention to how much water we used via the water bill.  3000 gallons a month.  I didn't water outside at all, didn't conserve in the house, and had a big fat clothes washing machine that had to fill up all the way.  Knowing this number, I opted for 30,000 gallons of storage.  Three 10,000 gallon tanks.   Built my own Barndominuim for catching rainwater that my tanks and I live under.  5400 square feet of catching area.  Much smaller living area.  1 inch of rain on 1000 square feet gets a person 600 gallons of water, if you catch it all.  The math says when I get 1 inch of rain, I get 3200 gallons of water.   IF I catch it all.   Big problem in the hill country is that when storms come, they dump like crazy.  You really need to design a system to handle the big fast rains.

Lived here for 15 years.   Worst time we made it through, it didn't rain for 59 days some 7 years back.  Still had 30% left.  I still don't water outside.   But I do fill up a 4 foot x 16 foot swimming pool every summer.

It all depends on where you live,  I 35 (the Balcones Escarpment) is a dividing line where rain fall totals change dramatically, so the design needs to reflect your specific area's annual rainfall.  I strongly encourage you to make the switch to rain water.  God always provides!   :great:

Thanks, man. I'm east of I-35 and thinking of moving even easter.  Harvesting bounty to make it through lean is wise advice. Here's hoping everybody eventually gets on board.
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

 


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