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There Will Be Blood

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SHANEA

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There Will Be Blood
« on: June 20, 2007, 12:46:01 PM »
Movie that was filmed around Marfa is scheduled for release later this year.

See the clip @

See the information on the movie @ http://martha.fischer.cinematical.com/2007/06/16/the-first-teaser-for-there-will-be-blood-is-online/
 
http://imdb.com/title/tt0469494/

http://www.alpineavalanche.com/articles/2006/06/01/news/news03.txt

NOTE:  This is old news from back in 2006...
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Extras needed for movie

Pre-production continues on the movie "There will be blood," which will be shot on a ranch south of Marfa this summer.

As many as 300 local extras will be needed, according to Kristan Berona, extras casting director for the film. Open casting calls have been held, with more to come, including one at Alpine's Bread and Breakfast this Sunday, June 4, at noon.

Berona is interested in talking to anyone who wants to work as an extra. The pay is hourly with lots of overtime expected. No acting experience is necessary and persons who are cast should be able to commit to several weeks work. Berona can be reached at the extras hotline at 432/729-1801 or at any open casting call.

The movie, starring academy award winner Daniel Day-Lewis ("Gangs of New York"), is based on Upton Sinclair's novel "Oil!" The novel, written in 1927, was described by one reviewer as "big and brawling" and did for California's oil industry what Sinclair's "The Jungle" did for Chicago's meat packing factories. The plot follows the clash between an oil developer and his son.

The screenplay for the film was written by director Paul Thomas Anderson ("Boogie Nights," "Magnolia"). Cast and crew are expected to be in the Big Bend through July.

No Country for Old Men

A second movie is also in pre-production in the area. "No Country for Old Men," based on Cormac McCarthy' latest novel, is slated for shooting at locations in Texas and New Mexico in upcoming months.

Tommy Lee Jones will star in the movie. Joel Coen who wrote "Fargo" and "Oh Brother Where Art Thou" will direct.

According to the movie's website, "Violence and mayhem ensue after a hunter stumbles upon some dead bodies, a stash of heroin and more than $2 million in cash near the Rio Grande."

Further information on casting and shooting locations is due to be released in the near future by Paramount Pictures, producer of the movie.

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SHANEA

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Why Marfa?
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2007, 05:56:54 PM »
This is an excerpt from a much longer article concerning the new legislation on creating incentive to film movies in Texas..

See the complete article @ http://www.star-telegram.com/movies/story/176496.html

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Reel 'em in
Bring the cameras, but don't mess with Texas
By CARY DARLING
Star-Telegram staff writer
......
Why Marfa?

The two most high-profile Texas-shot movies set to open this fall have something unique in common: Both were partly filmed in the West Texas town of Marfa.

November brings the release of the Coen brothers' thriller No Country for Old Men, based on the Cormac McCarthy novel and starring Tommy Lee Jones and Javier Bardem. Although most of the shooting of this Texas-set film took place in Albuquerque, the Coens apparently insisted on using Marfa for one of the most elaborate set-pieces in the movie.

The same month, we'll also see There Will Be Blood, the latest from Paul Thomas Anderson (Boogie Nights, Punch-Drunk Love), starring Daniel Day-Lewis. It too, was shot in New Mexico and Marfa.

Why the sudden burst of popularity for this middle-of-nowhere town, population approximately 2,000?

"With both of those films, the filmmakers really loved Marfa," says Texas Film Commissioner Bob Hudgins, who notes that both pictures were shot in 2006, before the new incentive law was passed. "They had visited there previously, and fought the battle to make the films there."

According to Hudgins, Marfa was an especially good match for There Will Be Blood (based loosely on Upton Sinclair's novel Oil!), because Anderson needed a mostly empty town with a railroad running through. "Marfa has the perfect layout for this town that they needed to create in the movie," Hudgins says.

-- Christopher Kelly
cdarling@star-telegram.com
Cary Darling is the Star-Telegram pop culture critic, 817-390-7571


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Offline Mariaalicia

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Re: There Will Be Blood
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2007, 11:58:33 PM »
There Will Be Blood

Art-house darling Paul Thomas Anderson (Boogie Nights, Magnolia) delivers his much-anticipated adaptation of Upton Sinclair's novel Oil!, starring Daniel Day-Lewis as a maniacal oil magnate. The film, which was partly shot in Marfa, has perhaps the most mesmerizing trailer playing in theaters right now. Dec. 25



Hmmmmm. I see what you mean by mesmerizing.  I can hardly wait to see this film.  Just saw 3:10 to Yuma, a worthy movie, not quite like Clint Eastwoods "Unforgiven" but almost as good.  The ending is.....not telling you...Ha ha....watching this movie is like riding a horse as fast as it will go.   

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WayneR

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Re: There Will Be Blood
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2007, 09:24:27 AM »
I was surfing channels several weeks ago and a Western movie caught my interest starring Tommy Lee Jones.  Turned out the movie was The three Burials of M. Estrada.  What kept my interest was several scenes at BIBE, namely Castolon and Santa Elena Canyon.  There were probably more- I watched just the last 30 minutes or so...

The movie credits listed BIBE and BBRSP as shooting locations.

 

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Offline westtex

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Re: There Will Be Blood
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2007, 01:39:04 PM »
Don't forget about No Country for Old Men based on Cormic McCarthy's book.  You can see Chinati Peak in the trailer.

resist much, obey little

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SHANEA

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Re: There Will Be Blood
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2007, 10:10:37 AM »
Bottom Line: Daniel Day-Lewis stuns in Paul Thomas Anderson's saga of a soul-dead oil man.
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There Will Be Blood
Bottom Line: Daniel Day-Lewis stuns in Paul Thomas Anderson's saga of a soul-dead oil man.
By John DeFore
Oct 1, 2007

Daniel Day-Lewis plays a prospector who seemingly exists to do nothing but find and sell oil.

AUSTIN -- Both an epic and a miniature, Paul Thomas Anderson's "There Will Be Blood" uses the fewest possible brush strokes, spread across a vast canvas, to paint a portrait of greed at the beginning of the American century. Built around another powerhouse performance by Daniel Day-Lewis, it's a certain awards contender and will be a strong draw for serious moviegoers.

Partially shot in Marfa, Texas, and stretching across three decades -- just enough time for an infant to rise up and defy his father -- it begs comparison to another Marfa production, "Giant." "Blood" has none of that film's melodramatic sprawl, though. Instead, it pares allegory-friendly material down to the elementals. It shows not the birth of the American oil business but the origin of a certain kind of oil man -- self-made, hands-on, destined for great wealth but doomed to not enjoy it -- then pits this capitalistic force of nature against its Bible-thumping mirror image, hinting at the culture-shaping sibling rivalry between the influence of God and of Mammon in America.

Day-Lewis plays Daniel Plainview, a prospector introduced in a wordless sequence showing his progression from heavy-bearded miner to civilized man with prospects: In the entire first reel, the only dialogue we hear is a muttered "there she is" as Plainview finds his buried treasure. The soundtrack is dominated by wilding clouds of strings that bestow on petroleum the mysterious power of Stanley Kubrick's famous obelisk.

That music, by Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood, is captivating and sometimes intense, greatly contributing to the sense that tectonic forces lie beneath the drama.
The film then makes up for lost time as Plainview addresses a gathering of country landowners in hopes of talking his way onto their property. In Day-Lewis' hands, the spiel becomes a John Huston-ish seduction, a velvet rumble about how qualified he is to suck oil from their dirt and transmute it to wealth for them and their children. When his listeners hesitate before taking the bait, Plainview refuses them a second chance, moving briskly to the next-best prospect. Eventually, he lands a territory with vast, empire-building potential, and the film settles down there, watching him struggle to exploit the discovery.

The film isn't as bloody as its title suggests, but from the start it makes the most of what violence it contains. The dangers of digging for oil are starkly depicted, and at one point -- during a hair-raising sequence in which a just-struck gusher catches fire -- Plainview's young adopted son takes a fall that costs him his hearing.

That loss and a more mysterious family matter are all we see of Plainview's personal life; he seemingly exists to do nothing but find and sell oil. An obstacle arrives in the person of Paul Dano's Eli Sunday, a self-styled man of God hoping to funnel as much as possible of his congregation's impending wealth into glorifying the Almighty. Barely old enough to shave, Sunday spellbinds listeners with frenzied exorcisms and threatens to steer his flock away from the man who needs their land.

Director Anderson's critics might not know what to do with this picture, which has none of the attention-grabbing flourishes of earlier films -- no hailstorms of frogs or deus ex machina pianos here. The closest it gets to self-conscious showiness is its closing scene, a confrontation as memorably strange as the fireworks-popping, "Jessie's Girl"-belting drug deal in "Boogie Nights." Its setting is as visually spare (a highlight of Jack Fisk's brilliant production design) as the other was decadent and cluttered, and eventually the scene makes good on the title's promise -- but only after offering a virtuoso humiliation to mirror one Plainview suffers earlier in the story.

Even here, though, what could be mere showboating serves as the last step on the path "Blood" started out on: drawing us slowly and with steadily increasing horror into the bitter worldview of a man whose name suggests he sees the world for what it is.

THERE WILL BE BLOOD
Paramount Vantage
Ghoulardi Film Co./Paramount Vantage/Miramax Films/Scott Rudin Prods.
Credits:
Director-screenwriter: Paul Thomas Anderson
Based on the novel by: Upton Sinclair
Producers: Paul Thomas Anderson, Daniel Lupi, Joanne Sellar
Executive producers: Scott Rudin, Eric Schlosser
Director of photography: Robert Elswit
Production designer: Jack Fisk
Music: Jonny Greenwood
Costume designer: Mark Bridges
Editors: Tatiana S. Riegel, Dylan Tichenor
Cast:
Daniel Plainview: Daniel Day-Lewis
Eli Sunday: Paul Dano
H.W.: Dillion Freasier
Fletcher Hamilton: Ciaran Hinds
Running time -- 158 minutes
MPAA rating: R

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Daniel Day-Lewis plays a prospector who seemingly exists to do nothing but find and sell oil.

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Offline Roger, Roger

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Re: There Will Be Blood
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2007, 08:26:39 AM »
Don't forget about No Country for Old Men based on Cormic McCarthy's book.  You can see Chinati Peak in the trailer.



I read the book last week.  Fantastic.  I can't wait for the movie.

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SHANEA

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Offline Casa Grande

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Re: There Will Be Blood
« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2008, 08:05:57 AM »
HOT OFF THE PRESS:

NOMINATED FOR BEST PICTURE!  Gotta lotta nominations:

http://www.oscar.com/

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Offline homerboy2u

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Re: There Will Be Blood
« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2008, 08:40:48 AM »
I have got to go and  see this movie...it looks as though it has an aura of Old West Modern Day Oil Adventure Saga.....Goodie !!
Stay thirsty, my friends.

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Offline Roy

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Re: There Will Be Blood
« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2008, 09:21:18 AM »
Saw some clips from it on Charlie Rose;  he was interviewing Lewis.  Photography was exceptional,;  I've also heard it's one the critics will love but maybe not the audience.

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SHANEA

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