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Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip

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Offline Reece

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2017, 08:40:51 AM »
Is that next to the last photo Townsend Point?


Sent from my iPhone using Big Bend Chat

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Offline Flash

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2017, 09:10:00 AM »
Is that next to the last photo Townsend Point?

That's the very tip of the Southeast and Northeast Rims or just call it the East Rim, if you like. Kind looks like a ship to me sometimes, other times it looks more like a train. Someone needs to go climb up there or just rappel down...  :eusa_whistle:

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Offline Flash

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2017, 11:28:43 PM »
Jalco, Reece, tusker, HMoD, and Mule Ears,

Thanks for the kind words. Glad you are enjoying the yarn and the photos.

In addition to help of the this forum, I really got to say that I have benefitted greatly from information shared by TWWG and ElHombre on Juniper Canyon in general and about the springs in particular.  Glad to share in turn what I am learning with the folks on these boards.

- Flash

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Offline Flash

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #18 on: February 14, 2017, 11:37:04 PM »
Sunday the 11th,  Part I

Sunrise over the Sierra del Carmen’s


The hills begin to light up


Morning clouds in the sky over the Rim


Compact little campsite on a patch of gravel


Now the fiery sunrise commences


Boiling a kettle of water on the trusty Esbit


This little gravel patch was my dining room


Local ocotillo weather station:  Approx. 50+/-2 degrees


Looking back after starting the hike to the saddle between the twin-crowned foothill on the north side of the Lower Juniper Spring canyon. There’s the tent! Later I would use the two giant daggers to the right as a marker to help find camp from up above.


Seemed like every type of Chihuahaun desert plant was present on that gravel terrace where I camped.


That low hill just left of center is why you really cannot see much of this area from the trailhead.


Looking across the canyon toward the opposite crowned foothill


Reached the first intermediate summit. Down below are some of the boulders I inspected yesterday.


Zoomed in on my tent, I notice it blends in pretty well.


The Juniper Canyon Trailhead is slightly above dead center, above the near hill and this side of the dark hills beyond.


Hey, that’s my truck out there! Can you spot it?


More resurrection plants


Higher now and looking out across the wider valley


Approaching the 2nd mini-summit. That saddle up yonder is my goal.



To be continued…
« Last Edit: February 15, 2017, 06:43:52 PM by Flash »

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Offline elhombre

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2017, 09:31:16 AM »
Great pictures of the tent out there in the middle of nowhere.  Makes me wish I was out there now!  Those old rock structures are a cool find.  Shows that the spring earned a name because it must run all the time. 
The older I get, the more I realize what freedom really means.  May God bless America

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Offline Robert

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2017, 09:59:19 AM »
Fantastic report and photos, I felt like I was out there with you.

Thanks!

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Offline Flash

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #21 on: February 15, 2017, 10:32:33 PM »
Great pictures of the tent out there in the middle of nowhere.  Makes me wish I was out there now!  Those old rock structures are a cool find.  Shows that the spring earned a name because it must run all the time.
Thanks! It feels like the big middle of nowhere indeed.  I think the Apaches, then later the Cowboys, hung out there occasionally, but don't think it was a permanent home for either. I wonder who was the land owner before the Park? Probably not Dodson, I am thinking...

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Offline Flash

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2017, 10:33:33 PM »
Fantastic report and photos, I felt like I was out there with you.

Thanks!
No problem. Hope it made the world of work a bit more bearable!  8)

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Offline Flash

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #23 on: February 15, 2017, 10:47:15 PM »
Sunday the 11th, Part II

The cholla and the ocotillos awaited me on the way to next height, so I had to skirt this mob.


The third summit reached about 10 o’clock was interesting to me because...


it had a fair-sized flat area behind the rocky outcrop with a nice sitting stone...


and a great view also!


The last stretch to gain the saddle was the roughest and steepest part by far.


I attacked it by zigzagging my way upward.


Stopping frequently to look about me


Had to think it through and revise my line of attack repeatedly. The cholla were now joined by a dagger and a sotol.


Looking left and ...


then to the right.


The left crown and ...


then the right crown.


Almost there


Finally, I reached the saddle where I found it was smoother terrain and covered with a lot of tall grass.


In the saddle looking left ...


then over to the right.


Looking back to where I had come from.


The crown top to the south looked the higher of the two, so I climbed the boulders to get on top, where I found it was like a wall about four feet wide and easy to walk on.


I began scanning this heretofore-unseen-to-my-eyes region between the Rim and the Foothills. This is the southern part of the watershed that feeds into the top of the Lower Juniper Spring canyon.


To my right is the northern part of that same watershed on the left side of the picture, then a divide roughly down the center, and to the right is a vast drainage the feeds the next canyon to the north.


From the left is the skirt of the East Rim, Toll Mountain, Casa Grande, and a bit of Lost Mine, and then Crown Mountain. In the center are three more crown-topped foothills in line with the one on which I am standing.


Note the slick rock drainage channel with a couple puddles of water in it. It then merges with a drainage from the other direction at a pouroff at the top of the Lower Juniper Spring canyon.


Looking toward the north, the ridge with the orange colored outcrop is in fact a dike. On the other side of it are the flats I had hiked to in April 2016. The infamous Overlook Campsite is on the far left end of the dike ridge. Check out the size of those red boulders (rhyolite?) along the lower slopes below the Rim.


Crown Mountain in the distance and the north crown top in the center


The crown-topped foothill on the opposite side of the Lower Juniper Spring canyon.


The Southeast Rim


Standing at the far end of the accessible part of the wall, I am viewing the opening to the Lower Juniper Spring canyon.


Looking down the Lower Juniper Spring canyon wash. My camp is in the center to the left of the wash.


More Juniper Canyon from the wall.


I have wondered if these foothills were once at the same level as the Rim and have slumped away somehow...


I’d like to explore that slickrock drainage channel across the way...


There are some pretty good-sized trees down there.


Another view up the valley


If not mistaken, that mountain may be the Point 5412.


Climbing back down the boulders to the saddle, I descended a bit on the west side to get a closer look at the distinct small trees that dotted the west side of this dual-crowned foothill.


What is this tree? I would be interested if anybody knows.


A close up of the divide between the watersheds


I am now heading back up to the saddle before descending the east side and returning to camp.



To be continued...


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Offline Jalco

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #24 on: February 16, 2017, 08:08:59 AM »
Outstanding!  That slick rock drainage does indeed beckon...

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Offline Flash

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #25 on: February 16, 2017, 10:13:10 AM »
Nothing like an engineers mind to seek out all the details on a subject.  Flash you are certainly the person to go to for info on lower Juniper canyon for sure, thanks!
You are most welcome. Looking forward to reading the tale of what Robert, Mitch, and you encountered in Wilds of Arroyo Venado!

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Offline Flash

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #26 on: February 16, 2017, 07:55:36 PM »
Sunday the 11th, Part III

On the way down from the saddle as I was returning, I came upon a distinct trail that crossed my path.


I was intrigued because it seemed to follow the contours, wrapping around the foothill and then angling up into the ravine on the north side.


I followed it for about a 1/8 mile until it turned up into the next canyon to the north. This looked like the smarter way to enter the valley beyond, rather than climbing the additional 150 feet to go over the saddle.  I marked a waypoint so I might use this route on a possible future trip.


A close up of the pouroff in the canyon


On my left is the north crown top.


To the right of it is the Southeast Rim centered in the canyon.


On the right of that is the next crown-topped foothill to the north.


Another lesser foothill was straight across the canyon from me with Crown Mountain in the background.


On the way back, I had a Narnia moment when I first laid eyes upon this rock and laughed as “The Stone Table” came to my mind. Alas, I wasn’t able to locate Aslan anywhere about.


Resuming my descent toward camp, I followed a slightly different route. Here I am following a water course downward for a short distance.


Beneath a rock outcrop with a nice hole.


Nest in a cholla


Passing beneath one of the outcroppings, I found an overhang that might have actually served as a shelter of sorts. Underneath it was a tumbled down ring of rocks, maybe 10 feet by 6 feet. Some blackening can be seen directly above the center of the ring of rocks...


Similar to the flat spot I found earlier, I imagined this location serving as a high lookout for a camp down below near the grinding holes.


Way later in the day, after driving out from Juniper Canyon, I found a couple metates on top of boulder, while walking about and stretching my legs at an interesting spot.




To be continued...

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Online House Made of Dawn

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #27 on: February 16, 2017, 08:11:09 PM »
Flash, the things you find on your hikes just flabbergast me. I wish I could take your eyes with me on a hike. I'm thinking that nest was made by a Verdin (Auriparas flaviceps). 

And I love the thermometer - who among us doesn't carry one of those?  Ye shall know us by our signs......
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline Flash

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #28 on: February 16, 2017, 11:48:49 PM »
Monday the 12th

Sunrise over Casa Grande at Basin Site #3


Parked on Dagger Flat Auto Trail


Setting out for Leopold Tinaja following a ridge that would take me to the head of the canyon.


As I hiked along the ridge, I noticed in the shallow valley to my right there were giant daggers all along the length of it.


On the left was another valley I had followed the first time I visited the tinaja. The Chisos are in the distance beyond the buttes.


This is a prime example of an ideally situated Dagger Couch. I tested more than one. They are not prickly and are safe to sit on, especially in the shade.


Shade from giant daggers is good stuff. Just keep a respectful distance.


About noon, I reached the edge of the canyon that holds the tinaja.


After another rest in the shade of giant dagger, I began slowly working my way along the rim around toward the head of the canyon.


As I understand it, Leopold Tinaja is that basin at the foot of the cliff that is known to have held water in the past. Both times I have visited, however, there was no water. Perhaps it is a timing thing.


The ancient rickety ladder was found to be still leaning against the canyon wall. The bee hole is above and to the left of the top of the ladder. Pretty sure the orange streaks are from cinnabar leaching out of the limestone layers.


That vegetation choked side canyon is probably the greenest spot in the area.


Coming around the side canyon, I saw a lot of healthy looking trees down there. My thoughts were that part must stay wetter after a rain. Also, this may be where the uprights for the ladder had been obtained.


Looking across at the streaks and the ladder


Reaching finally the head of the main canyon and looking down, I had an amazing discovery. About 15 feet down the pour off, was a hanging tinaja! Water!


Zooming in from same spot. Yeah, that’s water.


Coming around so I was right above, I could see it was approximately 5’ long x 3’ wide x 12” deep. Maybe THIS is Leopold Tinaja, I wondered to myself,


Putting on my gloves, I carefully worked my way down to the level of the hanging pool of water. The sharp-edged limestone afforded me safe grip and sure footholds, as I carefully lowered myself down, one step or hand hold at a time, to the shelf below.


Looking back at the way I had come down to the shelf. My pack got left uo toward the top.


Water to gather if you are game enough...


Once there, the shelf was extensive enough that I walked over several yards along the cliff face to the right.


Here I am looking back to the left at cliff.


Climbing back up, I sat down for some lunch in the shade next to a dagger. The breeze here felt great, being right at the head of the canyon. This was the best spot on an otherwise fairly warm day.


Another Dagger Couch in the shade


One of several holes of a badger colony, I am presuming.


This lechuguilla plant looked like an artichoke that had been torn apart and eaten. What kind of animal does that?


The daggers having multiple trunks amazed me. Sometimes there would be an empty spot on one side where you could sit down in the shade as if in a big chair.


Driving down Ross Maxwell, I spotted the Window with Casa Grande peeking through and catching the evening sun.


Cattail Canyon was looking mysterious in the evening sun.


The Blue Creek Ranch bear boxes are for water only.


Number 429 had been here checking the water, but who is checking the checkers?


I spotted the old stone water tank base. I know! Let’s install a windmill and a storage tank for use by hikers! No bear boxes needed!


Sunset at Sotol Vista


Super moon rising in the east



To be continued...
« Last Edit: February 17, 2017, 12:36:47 PM by Flash »

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Offline Flash

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Re: Flash December 9-13, 2016 Trip
« Reply #29 on: February 17, 2017, 09:51:36 AM »

I'm thinking that nest was made by a Verdin (Auriparas flaviceps). 

Thanks for the identification on the bird nest. The bird was there initially, but it flitted off as I negotiated a loose slope while rounding the end of a rocky outcrop so I could pass below it. My footing was precarious at best as I snapped the picture.  ;)

 


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