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Headed for the Bend (Sept. 11-15, 2015)

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Offline Jonathan Sadow

  • Coyote
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  • 194
Re: Headed for the Bend (Sept. 11-15, 2015)
« Reply #45 on: October 02, 2015, 11:28:01 PM »
Saturday September 12, 2015 - Cattail Falls - Part I

[...]
I see leaves like these in other wet parts of the Chisos. What tree is this?


[...]
Cattail Falls. More of those leaves...


Unfortunately, you don't have anything in these photos to show the scale of the trees' or their leaves' sizes (other than Cattail Falls and the Chisos Mountains, I guess...), but I think these are examples of Ungnadia speciosa, the Mexican Buckeye or Monilla.  Wauer and Fleming in their classic Naturalist's Big Bend state that it

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... occurs in the cooler canyons within the lower elevations....  In summer, it produces large, three-lobed pods that contain dark, brown poisonous berries.

If you look at the upper right edge of the lower picture, you'll see what appears to be a seed pod that matches that description.  Be glad that you didn't decide to snack on them!

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Offline Flash

  • Mountain Lion
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  • 2007
Re: Headed for the Bend (Sept. 11-15, 2015)
« Reply #46 on: October 04, 2015, 05:51:53 PM »
Unfortunately, you don't have anything in these photos to show the scale of the trees' or their leaves' sizes (other than Cattail Falls and the Chisos Mountains, I guess...), but I think these are examples of Ungnadia speciosa, the Mexican Buckeye or Monilla.  Wauer and Fleming in their classic Naturalist's Big Bend state that it

Quote
... occurs in the cooler canyons within the lower elevations....  In summer, it produces large, three-lobed pods that contain dark, brown poisonous berries.

If you look at the upper right edge of the lower picture, you'll see what appears to be a seed pod that matches that description.  Be glad that you didn't decide to snack on them!

Jonathan, I think you are correct that they are Mexican Buckeye. Saw plenty in Maple Canyon growing beneath the maple trees. I often wonder after the fact about what I am seeing in my photos and I overlooked that tell tale seed pod. What puzzles me is the literature seems to refer to the Mexican Buckeye as a shrub or small tree, but I have seen rather large trees in the High Chisos from above down in canyons below with similar pecan-like leaves. They often look to be 20 to 30 feet tall.

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Offline House Made of Dawn

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  • Golden Eagle
  • Mountain Lion
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  • Backpacking since '78, Big Bend since '95.
Re: Headed for the Bend (Sept. 11-15, 2015)
« Reply #47 on: November 09, 2018, 12:12:07 PM »
Mexican Buckeye, for sure. Flash, I just found this TR while doing some research. Fantastic! You have inspired me. As the saying goes, "if I see far, it is only because I stand on the shoulders of giants." Thanks for the lift, man.
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

 


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