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Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again

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Offline Jalco

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #240 on: January 13, 2018, 05:40:48 AM »
that is a winding river. wow

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Offline Talusman

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #241 on: January 13, 2018, 08:42:49 AM »
House,
I saw Lance's post before I went to bed last night and it made me think of something you said in yours earlier (which he quoted). I do think there have been many humans here before us, and many have walked the same areas. Where I disagree though is I believe there are still areas on this planet that no man or woman may have actually stepped in exactly the same place. Time and erosion changes the earth and you may have very well placed your foot upon the earth in a spot no one has before you. Sure, on a busy street, common trail, hallway at work, or along the Rio Grande where many people needed the water, there may have been thousands of foot steps placed right where you place yours. But there are places in my opinion that you, or others, may have set your foot in just a place, or angle, on newly washed up rock, for the very first time. That's my belief. Now, where I am certain is this point, your trip was a very first and unique trip, never to be replicated in human history. Sure, one can try and follow your topo map and try and trace your exact footprints. Thousands could try it. But no one will ever walk that trip life you did. See the stars at that moment in time on any night from that angle from that place. Hear a coyote in the night at that exact time where you were. Think about your wife and kids and your life while you placed a foot step in one certain area. Or have a guy like ME there at a time when you really needed it. It's yours alone. All of it, combined, makes it the first in the history of the world and it will never be repeated in the same way. I think that is one of the reasons we all go out there, to have these unique moments in time and place. I think that is why many of us love this board, as reading these posts can partially take us there to enjoy some of it each time anyone shares. And there is one more thing you really should do.

Humbleness is a wonderful thing. It is easier to brag and compliment one who has it, much harder to those who boast. But you really should take the praise those here have thrown at you. I know when I tell my wife before we go out she looks beautiful, and she makes that pffft sound, she has not accepted my sincere compliment. But where I stand in front of her, hold her shoulders, look her in the eye, and tell her again she looks beautiful, and she sees it in my eye and sincerely says thank you dear, she has accepted the compliment that is sincere. Many here have looked you in the literal eye and said, amazing, well done, one of the best ever, and they mean it. I hope you'll take the time to see it as it is and say, thank you, and sincerely accept it. AS you have stated, many could go out and do this trip, and do it better. But......., no one has sir. Again, well done.
"To Think is easy. To Act is difficult. To Act as one Thinks is the most difficult!"

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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #242 on: January 13, 2018, 09:29:39 AM »
But you really should take the praise those here have thrown at you. I know when I tell my wife before we go out she looks beautiful, and she makes that pffft sound, she has not accepted my sincere compliment. But where I stand in front of her, hold her shoulders, look her in the eye, and tell her again she looks beautiful, and she sees it in my eye and sincerely says thank you dear, she has accepted the compliment that is sincere. Many here have looked you in the literal eye and said, amazing, well done, one of the best ever, and they mean it. I hope you'll take the time to see it as it is and say, thank you, and sincerely accept it. AS you have stated, many could go out and do this trip, and do it better. But......., no one has sir. Again, well done.

Okay...I'm crying "uncle!"  Not as a joke, but sincerely. I hear you all. I get it.  It was a heck of a trip.

Now, where I am certain is this point, your trip was a very first and unique trip, never to be replicated in human history. Sure, one can try and follow your topo map and try and trace your exact footprints. Thousands could try it. But no one will ever walk that trip life you did. See the stars at that moment in time on any night from that angle from that place. Hear a coyote in the night at that exact time where you were. Think about your wife and kids and your life while you placed a foot step in one certain area. Or have a guy like ME there at a time when you really needed it. It's yours alone. All of it, combined, makes it the first in the history of the world and it will never be repeated in the same way. I think that is one of the reasons we all go out there, to have these unique moments in time and place. I think that is why many of us love this board, as reading these posts can partially take us there to enjoy some of it each time anyone shares.

That's beautifully put, Talusman.

Thank you, everyone, for the compliments, for the respect, and for the understanding. For committing the time to read and really engage with the story of my trip and all the thoughts and feelings it provoked in me, however personal and idiosyncratic they may be. I will tell you - quite frankly - that I write these trip reports mainly for myself: they're a kind of therapy. What I didn't anticipate is how much I'd be educated, enlightened and touched by the responses here. They mean a lot to me.  I'll second (again) Badknees' earlier post: this board is an amazing virtual place featuring amazing real people. I'm grateful.
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline iCe

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Offline catz

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #244 on: January 13, 2018, 11:20:09 AM »
Quote
I might need to force myself to eat more food just to keep my brain functioning in top form. And that might mean making the other adjustments you suggest.

 

The sad truth is that I usually arrive at the trailhead with several tens of thousands excess calories stored in a secret container carried somewhere between my sternum and my....brass. I count on those calories to augment what I carry in my backpack.

I was told by someone who should know that your body first eats your muscle and the fat later.
Wake me when it's time to go.

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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #245 on: January 13, 2018, 11:37:46 AM »
Quote
I might need to force myself to eat more food just to keep my brain functioning in top form. And that might mean making the other adjustments you suggest.

 

The sad truth is that I usually arrive at the trailhead with several tens of thousands excess calories stored in a secret container carried somewhere between my sternum and my....brass. I count on those calories to augment what I carry in my backpack.

I was told by someone who should know that your body first eats your muscle and the fat later.

That may be spot-on. I need to look into it. I can tell you one thing: my biceps never recovered from last year's trip. My thighs bounced back - maybe because of all the physical therapy on my legs - but my arms are spindly little things now. I need to work on that.
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline TexasAggieHiker

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #246 on: January 13, 2018, 05:09:24 PM »
Finally got to finish this epic trip report.  I find it humorous you consider the trip a "failure".  Yes, you didn't accomplish what you had originally set out to do, but what you did was nothing short of amazing.  You ran the length of the park on the river.  A trip in itself that anyone would consider a lifetime achievement.  But you saw it as a means to get to the eastern edge of the park.  I'm planning on running Santa Elena in my kayak this summer.  But now I want nothing more than to throw off the shackles of everyday life and run the river as far as I can.  I thank you for that.

I take great joy in reading your reports.  We have similar stories and interest.  I have a degree in wildlife ecology.  Wildlife biologist is one of several hats I've worn over my career.  My first job was working with the BCVI, GCWA, and BHCO.  I'm jealous of the Aplomado sighting!  We have similar interest in history and astronomy.  I see myself in your trips.

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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #247 on: January 13, 2018, 10:10:36 PM »
I see myself in your trips.

Lordy, I'm not surprised: we're practically doppelgangers!

Black-capped Vireo is probably my favorite bird in the entire world. There are a few other contenders sprinkled across the globe, but BCVI always draws me back home.  I've also done a bit of work on the Golden-cheeked Warbler over the years. It's gratifying to see both those species bouncing back so well.  The Aplomado sighting was wholly unexpected. Really makes me want to go back there and snoop around. If there's one, there's probably at least one more.

I'm planning on running Santa Elena in my kayak this summer.  But now I want nothing more than to throw off the shackles of everyday life and run the river as far as I can.  I thank you for that.

 :great:  The very best kind of compliment.  Thank you!

"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline Cookie

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #248 on: January 15, 2018, 10:37:36 AM »
I was told by someone who should know that your body first eats your muscle and the fat later.

I'm going to have to disagree with that, the body will use fat first. The physiology of muscle is for movement (whether it be hiking, breathing, digesting or birthing a baby) Fat is designed to be a back up energy source when none is available(Ketosis), maintain body temperature and protects vital organs. Fat serves the role of an efficient energy store because it can hold a lot of energy per gram. They body also needs protein as well to help rebuild muscle. If the protein is not provided the muscles can't repair themselves. Carbs don't rebuild muscles (just fuel them) so if you consume only carbs it will have an negative effect on your muscles.

 Ketosis is the state that your body enters into when it starts converting stored fat into Ketones to use as fuel for your cells. If you eat plenty of carbohydrates, you will never enter into Ketosis. Instead, your body will simply use all that glucose as a fuel. When the body runs out of calories for fuels, it turns to stored fat for fuel. The "Keto" diet is very popular right now (think "healthier" Adkins)
Signs of Ketosis:
Bad Breath. ...
Weight Loss. ...
Increased Ketones in the Blood. ...
Increased Ketones in the Breath or Urine. ...
Appetite Suppression. ...
Increased Focus and Energy. ...
Short-Term Fatigue. ...
Short-Term Decreases in Performance
Digestive issues
Insomnia

From what I've read most doctors say it's not bad for your body to go into Ketosis (unlike diabetic ketoacidosis). I would rather provide myself enough calories for the activity I'm doing. I've "bonked" twice on hikes and don't plan to do it again.
Just some food for thought, so to speak.
~Cookie

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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #249 on: January 15, 2018, 12:45:05 PM »
Thanks for the excellent info, Cookie.  That's how I've always seen it, too. Metabolic progression being carbs, then fat, then protein. During my 2016 cross-park hike, I lost 14lbs over the course of 14 days. Most of the loss was fat, but I think I lost some muscle, too. You may remember the photo of that urine-filled ziploc I took after several days of being trapped in my tent in a storm up on the Sue Peaks ridge without food and with very little water. My urine was dark orange, verging on reddish. I had gone full catabolic and was probably eating my own muscle by that time.

This year's hike was MUCH better. I never ran out of food and always drank plenty of water. My urine ran clear all the time and I never felt thirsty. But, as elhombre interestingly pointed out in his earlier post, my daily calorie budget was probably way too low. The more I think about it, the more I'm convinced that elhombre is probably right: the stupid campsite decisions I made in the storm after crossing over the ridge from Telephone Canyon into Ersnt Basin were probably the result of something very near to bonking. I'd become food-stupid. In good conditions, I could probably have gotten by on my daily calorie budget, but I went through 48 hours or so of really bad conditions.....bad enough that I didn't take time to stop and eat much of anything. By the time I set up that idiotic campsite, I'd probably consumed a maximum of 300 calories in the previous 22 hours. And I got what I deserved.
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline elhombre

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #250 on: January 15, 2018, 01:37:31 PM »

The more I think about it, the more I'm convinced that elhombre is probably right:


God bless you HMOD. 

Now, the question is why did my house erupt with laughter when Cookie read this out loud?
The Tolerant Left  Masters of the Universe at Apple, Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest, Criteo, Vimeo and Spotify removed Alex Jones and other conservative voices.  Liberals control every newspaper and cable network except Fox.  They so want to control the Internet and talk radio

 
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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #251 on: January 15, 2018, 01:41:26 PM »

The more I think about it, the more I'm convinced that elhombre is probably right:


God bless you HMOD. 

Now, the question is why did my house erupt with laughter when Cookie read this out loud?

Well, they say surprise is the key to comedy.  Or............maybe not.  :icon_wink:
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline entirelydave

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #252 on: January 17, 2018, 01:47:48 PM »
Long time lurker and haven't visited BBC in years. Stumbling across this trip report brought me out from under my rock.

What a well told adventure!  :notworthy:

Truly exciting stuff HMOD. I also consider this trip a success like many of the others who have posted before me. Best of luck in the future and I'll be here to read up on the next one.

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Offline House Made of Dawn

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #253 on: January 18, 2018, 09:55:37 AM »
Long time lurker and haven't visited BBC in years. Stumbling across this trip report brought me out from under my rock.

What a well told adventure!  :notworthy:

Truly exciting stuff HMOD. I also consider this trip a success like many of the others who have posted before me. Best of luck in the future and I'll be here to read up on the next one.

Thanks, Dave!
"The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts."

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Offline congahead

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Re: Round the Bend in 16 Days: There and Not-Quite Back Again
« Reply #254 on: March 12, 2018, 04:20:35 PM »
This weekend I was home by myself and looking for something to read. I have a stack of books and magazines on my nightstand, but I chose to re-read this trip report (I read it when you first published it but did not comment ... maybe because I was at a loss for words.)

I enjoyed it even more the second time ... so much nuance, humor, pain, frustration and details that I missed the first time.

So, two words to you:

1. Wow.
2. Thanks.
"The animals here will generally try to avoid you, but the plants will hurt you every chance they get."

 


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