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Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge

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Offline DesertRatShorty

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Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« on: January 02, 2018, 10:58:03 AM »
Uphill Both Ways

Part 2: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge

Dec 17-21, 2017

The basic route for this trip was simple, hiking north along Tornillo Creek from one bridge to the other. As a straight shot, this hike could be done in two days, three at the most. However, I was taking 5 days, one because I was still moving somewhat slowly because of sore knees, and two because I wanted to explore several of the interesting looking side drainages. In addition to the knee-friendly uphill grade, there are also several reliable water sources that I could leverage to keep my pack weight low, Ernst Tinaja, Carlota Tinaja, Banta shut-in, and Menagerie spring.

Caltopo map

Weather statistics courtesy of accuweather.com.

Day 1

RGV high: 65

After completing part one of my week earlier in the day, and a quick trip to the Basin, we were down in the southeast corner of the park by mid-afternoon. I took my friend to see the river and Boquillas Canyon from the roadside lookout. I then had the idea that I could maybe shave a few miles off my trip by starting at Ernst Tinaja. We got about a third of the way there on Old Ore Road (OOR) in my friend's Volvo before our better judgement kicked in and we turned around. At the rate we were going, I probably could have hiked to Ernst Tinaja in the time it would have taken him to drive there and back.

So I put in at the southern bridge around 4 p.m. with a pack weight of 24.5, 12 base, 8.5 food, and 4 water.



My knees were feeling a little better so I was able to make good time for me, around 2 mph, on the hard packed and mostly small gravel. There were a few formations to make it interesting.



I had condensation on my bag every morning this entire week. It was still damp from the night before north of Slickrock Canyon, so I pulled it out and draped it over my shoulders. This proved to be too warm, so I hung it over my pack held up by my Z-lite. This worked well, and within 30 minutes the bag was totally dry.



Draping your bag would be ill-advised in most parts of the park, but in lower Tornillo Creek the main channels are 100 ft wide, plenty of elbow room.



Nice views of the Sierra del Carmen



As sunset approached, I began looking for a place to camp. I had moved over to the westernmost channel, when I looked to the left and saw someone maybe 200 yards away. He was out of the wash, up on the shelf,  slowly working his way south and evidently looking for a campsite. At first I assumed it was another backpacker, but something about his appearance made me a little uncomfortable. It was too far to get a good look, but his clothing and backpack didn't look like conventional backpacker attire and gear. We never made eye contact so I don't know if he saw me. I continued north. A few minutes later I climbed a small hill just to look for a campsite, and looking south I could see him maybe a quarter mile away, apparently planning to camp right under the telephone lines, which again seemed an odd choice for a backpacker. I dropped into a side wash of a side wash and settled in for the night on a small shelf. I was a little unnerved but quickly shook it off and settled in for the night.

After returning home, I checked El Campo, the online permit system, and saw that the only permit issued for E01 that night was mine.

RGV low: 39
« Last Edit: December 31, 2018, 11:53:03 PM by DesertRatShorty »
I roamed and rambled, and I foller'ed my footsteps
   To the sparkling sands of her diamond deserts
   And all around me a voice was a'sounding
   This land was made for you and me

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2018, 11:39:45 AM »
I am loving this walk and excited that you are going to take the route up through Ernst Tinaja and then back down through Carlota.  I missed doing that in 2014 and Carlota canyon looks pretty cool from what I saw from the Old Ore Rd. last year with Robert and Mitch.

Good looking pack, I have the same one now, we will have to compare notes.   ;)
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
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Offline DesertRatShorty

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2018, 11:48:23 AM »
I am loving this walk and excited that you are going to take the route up through Ernst Tinaja and then back down through Carlota.  I missed doing that in 2014 and Carlota canyon looks pretty cool from what I saw from the Old Ore Rd. last year with Robert and Mitch.

Good looking pack, I have the same one now, we will have to compare notes.   ;)

The Carlota wash (with one "t" I now see) was great in the section I traveled, and also seemed nice north of Willow Tank from what I could see. Definitely opens up some loop options in this area.

The Kalais was excellent, but I'll have to wait until I get it up to 40 lbs before the final verdict, hopefully next year!
I roamed and rambled, and I foller'ed my footsteps
   To the sparkling sands of her diamond deserts
   And all around me a voice was a'sounding
   This land was made for you and me

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Offline Robert

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2018, 12:13:18 PM »
Great idea for a hike. I've hiked most of the creek but missing some sections. As you mentioned, easy on the knees, this is a nice hike to see a lot of different areas and potential for water refills or at least a cache. There are lots of options for further exploration just off the creek.

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Offline DesertRatShorty

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2018, 12:18:16 PM »
Day 2

RGV high: 63

With clear skies and another moist bag, I returned to Tornillo Creek with my bag over my shoulders and continued northward. Starting in the westernmost channel, I veered eastward and eventually came to the side wash that leads up to La Noria, seen here on the right.



The wash made for some easy walking. Note the Ernst Tinaja canyon in the distance. Also note that this is not the wash that flows through the canyon and drains Ernst Basin.



The La Noria ruins were soon clearly visible in the left, so I climbed out to check them out.





I then climbed a small mound and took this photo of the La Noria #2 campsite, note the truck driving down OOR, and also note El Pico just poking its nose over Cuesta Carlota.



I continued up the wash for a short ways and then hopped out on the south side to check out the cemetery. It would be hard to find a more scenic final resting place.



Back in the wash, I took it up to OOR and followed that and a spur road to the Ernst Tinaja trailhead. A couple of guys soon arrived to see and take some photos of the tinaja, these were the only people I would talk to the entire week.







After reaching the big tinaja, they returned to their car and I continued up the canyon.



The going was fairly straightforward until I reached the pouroff with the chockstone.



This was really the only time on the trip I didn’t fully appreciate what I was getting into. My knowledge of ascending the canyon came from a mule ears report from his trip with Mitch and Robert earlier in 2017. He said it was manageable if there was no water at the bottom of the pouroff, which I don't doubt. Well, now there was water. In addition, I had a pack. Rereading his report, perhaps I should have taken a hint from the fact that Mitch and Robert climbed all this way down the canyon, almost to Ernst Tinaja, but decided to let mule ears go it alone from here.

I did manage to safely ascend the pouroff, while keeping my shoes dry, but it took me about 30 minutes and a lot of energy to figure it out and execute it. First, I looked if there was a way to climb up the rocks to either side. No dice, too steep. I would have to go up the chute. I broke down my trekking poles and attached them to my pack. I did the same with my shoes and waded into the small pool, which was about three or four inches deep. For reference, the chockstone is about 10 feet above the bottom of the pool. The first task was to get my pack up the shoot far enough so that it would rest in place without sliding back down. Standing in the water at the base of the pouroff, and reaching as far as I could, I could not get the pack to rest, it kept sliding back down. At this point I started to feel some frustration. Then after a couple of minutes it occurred to me, I could take a section of a trekking pole and use it to push the pack an additional 3 feet up. So I did this, and the pack thankfully rested in place just below the boulder at the top of the pouroff. There were a few straps of my pack hanging down so that I could pull it back down if I decided I couldn't get myself up. I also tossed up the piece of trekking pole I had used so that it rested on my pack. Now all I had to do was get myself up. The problem is that it was a steep climb with very slick rock and I had wet feet. I really wasn't sure how it was going to work out, but I took one foot out of the water and allowed it to air dry for a few minutes. I then took the other foot out of the water, dripping wet, and with my back against one side and feet against the other held myself over the water. I had to be careful not to let the wet foot drip onto the dry foot. I managed to slowly walk my way up about 5 feet vertical, to the point where, using all four limbs, I could reach over with my dry left foot and plant it on the slightest of footholds in the chute, about 5 feet up. I then brought my other leg into the upper portion of the chute and with all fours worked my way up to my pack just below the boulder, where I could at last stand and support myself with just my feet. I didn't realize how much I was exerting myself, but when I got there I was exhausted, heart throbbing. After lifting my pack up over the boulder, I ate an energy bar and rested for about 5 minutes. Next I untied my shoes from my pack and put my dry shoes and socks on, very carefully as I was still standing on a 45-degree slope. Then using mostly upper body I was able to lift and drag myself up to the top of the boulder. Whew!

Looking back, the one thing I might have tried differently was to find some large rocks to pile at the bottom of the pouroff and use as stepstones.

There were a couple more significant obstacles just up the canyon where I used a rope to either raise or lower my pack, but nothing as challenging as the chockstone pouroff. I didn't take any pictures of this middle section because I was frankly ready to get the hell out of there, see ME’s report for photos. Toward the final stretch of the canyon I picked up 4 liters of water, bringing my pack weight to its maximum for the week at around 27.5. I knew there would be water up canyon since ME, Robert and Mitch found it there and it was clearly wetter now than it was then.



Exiting the canyon there was a cairned route



leading the crossroads.



From here I headed NW following the “Willow Tank trail” which follows the original ore road to Willow Tank. The road was overgrown in several places, but the vegetation was thin enough that it was not too difficult to work around these patches, and overall the walking and route finding were easy. Here’s a view looking back SE, Cuesta Carlota on the right.



There were some clear horseshoe prints heading south along the length of the trail.

After some time I made it to the high point of the trail where the terrain becomes quite barren.



I was moving slowly, taking long breaks about once an hour, because I think I had overdone it in the canyon earlier that day. Not just the climb, but walking too quickly to get out of the canyon, adrenaline pumping.

This shows the wash that drains the middle portion of the trail.



I had considered following this wash and making my way over to Carlota Tinaja, but when I saw this, I decided to continue on to Willow Tank and go from there. Looking back on this middle section of the trail.



About a mile south of Willow Tank, I found a nice campsite about a tenth of a mile east of the old road



and settled in for a beautiful sunset. Alto Relex:



Views toward the Chisos, note the rabbit.





About the time it got totally dark, I was still up doing my evening routine of stretching and rolling out tight muscles. I started seeing sheet lightning in the southwest, also the direction of the prevailing wind, and decided it was time to prep for a storm. My rain shelter plan was to lay my tarp over me, weighed down with rocks, and hope the rain passed quickly. So I went and found 15 of the heaviest rocks I could carry, expecting potentially strong winds, and set up a perimeter around my sleeping bag. I pulled the tarp over myself and folded it back just enough to allow me to get into my sleeping bag, with rocks weighing down the rest of the tarp. Within minutes, llight raindrops started, and I drew the tarp fully across me and placed rocks over the remaining edges. The rain was never intense in terms of drop frequency, but the drops themselves were pretty heavy. The first few minutes were fine, but within 30 minutes I started to get a lot of condensation on my bag. The rain showed no signs of letting up, so I decided I would have to actually pitch the tarp.

Unfortunately, I hadn't brought any stakes. On my previous two trips to the Bend, I think just about every single campsite was on hard rocky ground. I remember one night camped on the Dodson with ominous clouds approaching, I did my best to stake my tarp, hammering away at my groundhog stakes with a huge rock, and only being able to drive them down halfway into a loose fitting hole. After that, I had basically decided that stakes were dead weight in Big Bend. Ironically, every campsite this week was on soft soil that would have easily received my tarp stakes. Alas I did what I could, and came up with a sagging pitch using some of the rocks to hold down my tarp on the sides plus the two ridgeline ropes.  It wasn't pretty, but since my tarp is 8 by 10, ordinarily big enough for two people, even a lousy pitch got the job done. The tarp flapped regularly for several hours, but the pitch held, and my down bag never soaked through. Next time I'll bring those stakes, and I'm also sure I'll be on rock hard ground again.

RGV low: 40
« Last Edit: December 31, 2018, 11:56:09 PM by DesertRatShorty »
I roamed and rambled, and I foller'ed my footsteps
   To the sparkling sands of her diamond deserts
   And all around me a voice was a'sounding
   This land was made for you and me

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Offline DesertRatShorty

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2018, 12:21:50 PM »
Great idea for a hike. I've hiked most of the creek but missing some sections. As you mentioned, easy on the knees, this is a nice hike to see a lot of different areas and potential for water refills or at least a cache. There are lots of options for further exploration just off the creek.

Indeed, so many options I had to skip several fun-looking side washes, 7 days would have been about right.
I roamed and rambled, and I foller'ed my footsteps
   To the sparkling sands of her diamond deserts
   And all around me a voice was a'sounding
   This land was made for you and me

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Offline presidio

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2018, 12:49:07 PM »

In the late 90s, there was a day in the summer monsoon season when Tornillo Creek was running bank-to-bank and very close to the bridge deck.

It was VERY impressive.

I probably have a photo of this, but Homero should not get excited and expect to see it anytime soon.  :eusa_naughty:
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<  presidio  >
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Wendell (Garret Dillahunt): It's a mess, ain't it, sheriff?
Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones): If it ain't, it'll do till the mess gets here.
--No Country for Old Men (2007)

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Offline elhombre

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2018, 02:13:57 PM »
Cool route!

 I am going to say after visiting with a ranger for a while this past trip, and hearing the stories about the increased drug running through BB, you saw a drug mule.  Walking a backpack up from the Rio and leaving it under the wires at the creek would be an excellent recognizable drop spot.  I bet House of Dawn saw them working their craft when he floated by too.

We have always got around the choke stone at Ernest by using the crack with the grass growing out of it on the left (approaching from down stream; North side).  If the boots are a little worn, take them off and use your bare feet.  Fingers in the crack,  feet moving sideways, facing the rock.  I know, worthless advice now, but try it next time your over there.

Is your backpack a Seekoutside?  I just got mine and it looks like yours.  Light and very comfortable being wider than most, just doesn't have great ventilation.  If yours is the same, what do you think?
First Russian Collusion, then Mueller, then Obstruction, then illegal payment to Stormy Daniels, then tax returns. Now no formal vote on impeachment for a 30 min. phone call to Ukraine

No crime. No evidence, just more secret investigations

Drain the Swamp.  America will survive.  God Bless America

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Offline mule ears

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2018, 02:23:44 PM »

In the late 90s, there was a day in the summer monsoon season when Tornillo Creek was running bank-to-bank and very close to the bridge deck.

It was VERY impressive.

I probably have a photo of this, but Homero should not get excited and expect to see it anytime soon.  :eusa_naughty:

That must have been a hell of a rain event up stream for sure!
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
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Offline mule ears

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2018, 02:45:12 PM »
The Kalais was excellent, but I'll have to wait until I get it up to 40 lbs before the final verdict, hopefully next year!

I really liked how mine carried.  I trained with it in the low 40 pound range and it was just fine.  The heaviest this trip was abut 38 and it was great.  Still slips down a little on slick nylon fabrics but then I suffer from noassatall.   ;)  The new shoulder straps and hipbelt are more comfortable than my old version, which Scott carried on this trip and he said he really liked it.
temperatures exceed 100 degrees F
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Offline mediopelo

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2018, 04:25:05 PM »
Cool route!

 I am going to say after visiting with a ranger for a while this past trip, and hearing the stories about the increased drug running through BB, you saw a drug mule.  Walking a backpack up from the Rio and leaving it under the wires at the creek would be an excellent recognizable drop spot.  I bet House of Dawn saw them working their craft when he floated by too.

We have always got around the choke stone at Ernest by using the crack with the grass growing out of it on the left (approaching from down stream; North side).  If the boots are a little worn, take them off and use your bare feet.  Fingers in the crack,  feet moving sideways, facing the rock.  I know, worthless advice now, but try it next time your over there.

Is your backpack a Seekoutside?  I just got mine and it looks like yours.  Light and very comfortable being wider than most, just doesn't have great ventilation.  If yours is the same, what do you think?
I agree about the lone figure at the power line and I hope that someone in law enforcement in the park reads these posts. If backpackers are being brought in from north of the park it would make sense to have the load delivered a short distance so they would not have to risk being seen along the border. Those southbound horse tracks are also something they need to check out.

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Offline DesertRatShorty

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2018, 05:26:40 PM »

In the late 90s, there was a day in the summer monsoon season when Tornillo Creek was running bank-to-bank and very close to the bridge deck.

It was VERY impressive.


I probably have a photo of this, but Homero should not get excited and expect to see it anytime soon.  :eusa_naughty:

That must have been a hell of a rain event up stream for sure!

Here's a couple videos of Tornillo flashing, from the southern bridge.





tjavery has a couple great photos in this post

I recall seeing a pic like presidio mentioned (raging) but can seem to find it now.
I roamed and rambled, and I foller'ed my footsteps
   To the sparkling sands of her diamond deserts
   And all around me a voice was a'sounding
   This land was made for you and me

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Offline DesertRatShorty

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #12 on: January 02, 2018, 05:35:52 PM »
Cool route!

 I am going to say after visiting with a ranger for a while this past trip, and hearing the stories about the increased drug running through BB, you saw a drug mule.  Walking a backpack up from the Rio and leaving it under the wires at the creek would be an excellent recognizable drop spot.  I bet House of Dawn saw them working their craft when he floated by too.

We have always got around the choke stone at Ernest by using the crack with the grass growing out of it on the left (approaching from down stream; North side).  If the boots are a little worn, take them off and use your bare feet.  Fingers in the crack,  feet moving sideways, facing the rock.  I know, worthless advice now, but try it next time your over there.

Is your backpack a Seekoutside?  I just got mine and it looks like yours.  Light and very comfortable being wider than most, just doesn't have great ventilation.  If yours is the same, what do you think?

Agreed on it being a drug runner. The horseshoe prints on the Willow Tank trail are also suspicious. And a third sign will appear on Day 3 in the Carlota wash, stay tuned.

The pack is by Elemental Horizons, called the Kalais, per ME's recommendation. Great pack for weighing only 2.5 lbs. Supposed to carry well up to 45 but haven't gotten it up there yet.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2018, 02:01:35 PM by DesertRatShorty »
I roamed and rambled, and I foller'ed my footsteps
   To the sparkling sands of her diamond deserts
   And all around me a voice was a'sounding
   This land was made for you and me

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Offline elhombre

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2018, 05:58:07 PM »


Agreed on it being a drug runner. The horseshoe prints on the Willow Tank trail are also suspicious. And a third sign will appear in on Day 3 in the Carlota wash, stay tuned.

The pack is by Elemental Horizons, called the Kalais, per ME's recommendation. Great pack for weighing only 2.5 lbs. Supposed to carry well up to 45 but haven't gotten it up there yet.

I should read more carefully.  I now see your pack reference above.  AND Mule Ears should be getting some kind of backpack industry kickback because he was the one who told me about both your Elemental Horizon and Seekoutside packs.  I tried the Elemental Horizen one first, but it was too narrow and seemed to be maxed out at #45 I stuffed it with.  The Seekoutside fits my heavier loads.  I sometimes carry rope,harness, hardware, and helmet.  Other times it waders and flyfishing stuff.  But I have to say I really did think the quality of the Elemental Horizons was top notch. 

And somewhere in the cloud there is a video of the flood carrying uprooted cactus and branches that are hitting the underside of the Tornillo bridge.  I seem to remember stuff banging on the guardrail.
First Russian Collusion, then Mueller, then Obstruction, then illegal payment to Stormy Daniels, then tax returns. Now no formal vote on impeachment for a 30 min. phone call to Ukraine

No crime. No evidence, just more secret investigations

Drain the Swamp.  America will survive.  God Bless America

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Offline DesertRatShorty

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Re: Tornillo Creek, Bridge to Bridge
« Reply #14 on: January 02, 2018, 08:09:30 PM »
Day 3

RGV high: 67

It wasn't pretty but it got the job done.



Packing up my wet gear I continued north toward Willow Tank. A couple minutes after hitting the trail it began to sprinkle, but it didn’t last long. A large cloud in the southeast led to a late sunrise.



An old gate near the end of the trail, note the Ernst Basin campsite in the distance, and the dark patch which I suppose includes the actual Willow Tank.



My hope was to be able to take the wash leading to Carlota Tinaja. This hadn't been my main idea for getting back to Tornillo Creek, that had been the overgrown wash I had seen the previous day. So I wasn't really sure if this wash would work, but fortunately it was clear and very walkable. If this wash had also been overgrown I’d have been forced to walk OOR down to the tinaja.

The wash crosses the trail maybe a hundred yards from the Ernst Basin campsite, I could hear someone packing up as I walked by.

A really nice walk



I stumbled upon a hiking boot in the wash that had clearly been there for a while.



Quest brand, made in Mexico. I carried it down to OOR and left it on the roadside for someone to dispose of.

A mysterious fog over Ernst Basin.



More interesting geology above OOR.









With my water supply running low I arrived just in time to Carlota Tinaja. There are actually four large pools here, this is the smallest and closest to the road, the other three are lower down after a 12 foot pouroff.



The climb down was straightforward on the left.



The tinaja just below the pouroff has some of the greenest grasses I've seen in Big Bend.



The three pools down low were all bigger than the one up high, anyone know which one is actually named Carlota? The second one, just below the pouroff, seems quite persistent and supports a bit of life.

Saw some butterflies, a frog, and what I presume are mud swallow nests.



I took a nice long break here, at least an hour and a half. It was the perfect place to dry out my sodden gear.



Hey little buddy!



At 2 p.m. I downed a liter of water, carried two more (should’ve carried three), and set off down the wash, which resumes right after the fourth pool.



I then saw a dark form at the edge of the wash up ahead: a javelina. After a few seconds it darted into the brush on the right, and at the same time I saw two more dashing up the hill to the left, a juvenile and presumably its mother. I was able to get my camera out just in time to catch the little one heading over the hill.



The one on the right had joined another, maybe 75 feet from the wash, just hanging out.



After widening progressively the wash oddly narrows just before reaching Tornillo Creek.

Returning to the motherwash, I resumed my journey northward. Note the chili pepper.



There were interesting formations off to the left, and nice views of the Chisos.





After a while, to change things up, I climbed up on to the broad shelf to the east, and continued working northward, weaving through the creosote.





Around 4 p.m., I decided to call it a day, make my camp early, and enjoy the sunset which I could tell was going to be another good one -- one of the luxuries of taking 5 days to do a two-day hike. The sunset did not disappoint:







The photos don’t do it justice. At one point, for a few seconds, the whole world around me glowed a warm orangish red. I muttered to myself “That's the best sunset I've ever seen”. Maybe, maybe not, but definitely memorable.

Later that evening, it was totally dark and I had just slipped into my sleeping bag for the night. I was dozing off, not quite asleep, when I heard a sound. Most such sounds are generated by me, either my sleeping bag ruffling or stomach gurgling. But after a few seconds I decided this was definitely not me.

Fear overtook me, I bolted upright in my bag, put on my headlamp, and looked around. Unzipping my bag, I reached for a few rocks. Soon enough, I knew it had to be javelina rooting around from the distinct sniffing and snorting. In retrospect, I should have expected this, their tracks ran all through the terrain where I was camping. Despite this realization, my fear did not subside. I doubted they were interested in me, but thought there could be a chance they might trample me anyway. The first one I had heard was behind me to my right, the second to my front and right, the third off to the left. My head whipped from one sound to the next, but I never managed to actually see one. Like other ounce counters, I've switched to the Petzl e-LITE recently, which saves a couple of ounces over my older headlamp. The price paid for that savings in weight is a less intense beam, which is frankly diffuse and good for maybe 15 ft, whereas my old headlamp was strong and clear out to 40. So here I was, head whipping around trying to catch a glimpse of the javelinas in a dim light, never quite succeeding, in my own personal Blair Witch moment. That thought was good for a single chuckle, and enough to start the process of calming down.

After a few minutes, they had moved on and all was quiet again. My heart rate lowered, and I reminded myself that people have been camping here for a long long time, so far no known deaths by javelina.

RGV low: 45
« Last Edit: December 31, 2018, 11:59:25 PM by DesertRatShorty »
I roamed and rambled, and I foller'ed my footsteps
   To the sparkling sands of her diamond deserts
   And all around me a voice was a'sounding
   This land was made for you and me

 


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+-Calendar For Sale

 2019 BigBendChat Calendar on sale now!

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